Searching for ultra-violet ink for laundry marking
March 1, 2011 8:16 AM   Subscribe

I am interested in marking some of my more valuable clothing with ultra-violet ink. Does anyone know of consumer-side ways to do this? All the ultra-violet inks I see on the consumer market are designed for stamping skin, not cloth.

I have plenty of plain clothing that simply warrants a laundry stamp, but I also have some very nice clothing on which I wouldn't want to use black or white laundry ink, nor would I want to even sew my laundry label into it — either because of the shape of the clothing, its inherent value as a vintage or historical item, or the visibility of the tag, or some such.

Obviously, since it's clothing, it must cure and be washable, although washable is a flexible word — anything that valuable is not going through a washing machine and dryer, although some of them will be gently washed by hand by me, and others will go to dry-cleaning, furriers, & c.

I know that dry-cleaners have such machinery, but only to affix their own mark.
posted by jpallan to Clothing, Beauty, & Fashion (2 answers total)
 
If you consider something too valuable/historical to alter with a tag, you probably shouldn't use any sort of ink, let alone something weird like ultraviolet.

On things like reversible tops, etc., I've seen a type of tag attachment that allows it to be flipped around and not attached with a more solid line of stitching. It's basically one or two sturdy chains of thread/tiny braid with the tag attached to one or both of those instead of the garment; the chains themselves are the only points of attachment, so you've basically got two or four small points instead of a line. You could do that at just about any place on the garment where there's a seam.
posted by Madamina at 8:25 AM on March 1, 2011


Response by poster: Well, dry-cleaners will mark all clothing with ultra-violet ink regardless, so I'd rather it be my easily identifiably laundry mark rather than an assortment of ultra-violet inks from an assortment of dry-cleaners over the years …
posted by jpallan at 1:05 AM on March 7, 2011


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