Beyond Ava and Aidan?
January 2, 2010 6:42 PM   Subscribe

Baby Names for a girl and a boy? I'm pregnant with twins! Yay! Except that after months of fearing for the worst, we're nearing the end of the second trimester and we have no names ready. Help!

We hit our third trimester with twins! After a long, long decade of implantations and one failed adoption, I'm 28 weeks pregnant with two healthy sea monkeys! It's time to accept that we'll be driving to the hospital two car seats in the back. We're particularly ecstatic to find out that we've got a girl and a boy.

The problem is, what with the miscarriages and heartache over a birth mother who changed her mind, we've been so scared to ever really consider ourselves parents that we never got to the part where we pick out names. I've bookmarked tons of baby name books with my husband, but he's working overtime during the pregnancy to he can take time off when the twins arrive. I'd like to have a list of 20-30 names for each gender that he can peruse over lunch.

EITHER NAME:

I'm partial to British- or older-sounding names.
Nothing super-Biblical.
We don't care if the names sound good together, and we're steering clear of names that start with the same letter.

BOYS
-I love strong, masculine names like Henry, Charles/Charlie, Luke, Finn, and Wyatt. But these are all becoming quite popular.
-Alternatives: Stuart, Noel, Jameson/Jaime, Sebastian (too Disney?), Johnny (never hear that one much)
-No Aiden/Jayden/Braden
-Nothing overly Irish, like Connor, Seamus, Kieran, etc

GIRLS
-I love Ruby, Claire/Clara, Eve/Evie, Alma, Ansley, Imogen, Isla, and Esme (but with Twilight, Esme might be out)
-Nothing cloyingly feminine. I'm sick of the -ella business, the Ava/Avery trend. It's a girl, not a china plate.
-I like a lot of great-grandmotherly names, like Ada, Edie, Pearl and Ruth. As I'm product of my generation, I know that at least Ada is rising in popularity, too.

Do any of these names sound just terrible? What else is in the vein of English Grandparents' names?

anonymous because I'm technically still high-risk and we're a little gun shy of jinxing anything.
posted by anonymous to Society & Culture (72 answers total) 11 users marked this as a favorite
 
Congrats! I'd suggest looking at Nymbler. It was fantastic for name hunting. Just type in the names that you like and they'll point you in cool directions. Nearly all the unique names that I like by friends were found with Nymbler.
posted by k8t at 6:55 PM on January 2, 2010 [6 favorites]


Boys: Don't know where you're located, but in California, you're right - all those names are quite popular (but type 'em into Nymbler and you'll see some cool alternatives). I like Noel. Sebastian is getting pretty popular around here too. My boy is Thatcher. I like it is because it is unique and fun, but not too weird and can be spelled and said easily. Other boys names in our parenting group that I like: Davis, Lazlo, Gideon, Myles (lots of Myleses right now though). Lots of Becks and Becketts and Bennetts in our group too. We were planning on Fletcher or Dexter until Nymbler inspired us.

Girls: LOTS of Islas in my parenting group (~4 girls out of 20?) and that was November' 08 births. There were also a lot of Sadies/Sophies. My #1 girl name choice was Tess.
posted by k8t at 6:56 PM on January 2, 2010


Harry and Maisie. Those are the names I'd chosen for my child, whose sex I didn't know (pre-natal-ly).
posted by MrMoonPie at 7:02 PM on January 2, 2010


Or Josephine (you can call her Josie).
posted by MrMoonPie at 7:02 PM on January 2, 2010


Kenneth (Ken) and Virginia (Ginny).
posted by mathlete at 7:04 PM on January 2, 2010


The low hanging fruit is that you mentioned liking Luke... There's a perfect pairing if you want your kids to be weird. But if you want your kids to be cool, I suggest you reconsider Connor. I can't remember where I saw this, or what year it was for, but at one point the 11th most popular girls name was Sarah and the 11th most popular boys name was Connor. I know you don't like Connor, but as I see it, you have an opportunity.

Seriously, I like Charlie and Clara. I also think it's cool when someone's middle name was their grandmother's maiden name. For example, the boy could get his father's mother's and the girl could get your mother's.
posted by ifandonlyif at 7:10 PM on January 2, 2010


I've always been partial to Bronwyn. Gwyneth also. (I'm aware they're Welsh) I think Frances is a nice old fashioned name for a girl (it was actually my grandmother's name). Gemma makes me think English instantly, though it's applicable to many age groups. Jemima too, though here in the US there's that Aunt Jemima connotation.

For boys, I've always loved the name Barrett, and plan to use that if I ever have a son.
posted by cmgonzalez at 7:11 PM on January 2, 2010


Name the girl after me! Cecily is a very English name... And for a boy I love the name Grant.
posted by cecic at 7:13 PM on January 2, 2010


If you like very English sounding names, you could take a look at the Wikipedia category for Anglo-Saxon saints and its subcategories.
posted by Jahaza at 7:18 PM on January 2, 2010


Girls:

Julia
Laura
Anna

I would go with Charles, John or Henry. Who cares if they are popular? If you like the name, go with it. I also like James and William (Will).
posted by Fairchild at 7:19 PM on January 2, 2010 [1 favorite]


I'm super partial to Charles/ Charlie. I don't know why. It's just a good name. What about Hugh?

How do you feel about flower names: Rose, Violet, Lily, etc? I think of them as English grandmother names. Genevieve? Ida? Charlotte?
posted by craichead at 7:21 PM on January 2, 2010


I wanted to say that while I don't have any specific names to suggest, I have a few pairs of friends that are twins with similar-sounding names and really, really hate it, so try to avoid that. (I'm talking about stuff like, "Jenny and Jerry" or "Michelle and Michael.")
posted by Nattie at 7:22 PM on January 2, 2010


Victoria and Albert (also go well together), call her Vicky if you have any pity in kindergarten, though.
Elizabeth and Henry, Edward or Charles.
I like Tristan for a boy, but think Isolde is definitely too much along with it.
Other grandmotherly names: Helen, Margaret, Lucille, Frances.
Other English boys' names: Hugh (can't think of a Hugh that isn't/wasn't good-looking), William (becomes strong manly name "Bill"), Frederick.
posted by misha at 7:29 PM on January 2, 2010


Hazel and Jack.
posted by Red Loop at 7:29 PM on January 2, 2010


Another vote for Charles/Charlie and Claire/Clara, even if they do both start with C.

And popular or not, if I were having kids they'd be Henry and/or Jane, which I think are two of the most perfect names ever.
posted by chez shoes at 7:31 PM on January 2, 2010


We don't care if the names sound good together, and we're steering clear of names that start with the same letter.


It looks like they're already aware of that.

And yes, Charlie, Henry, Finn, Jameson and Luke are all becoming insanely popular. This bums me out before I freaking love all those names. We have similar tastes, anon.

I figure you'd regret calling your daughter Ruby, Pearl or any other gem if you want a strong, solid name. I like Clara and Stuart, but I always have.

I'm actually an An(n)sley, and I get a lot of compliments on my name. I understanding wanting to not unwittingly name your kid something that everyone else has, because I do think my unique name compelled me to live up to being a unique person, as I was told from the beginning that my name was special and unusual. Apparently said name is getting trendy (great) so we'll see how long that lasts.

Alternatives for girls: Julia, Adele, Amelia, Iris, Ida, Adelaide, May, Alice, Charlotte, Eleanor, Celeste, Beatrice, Adeline, Bette (though be aware that bête is "beast" in French). I personally love the name Marin for a girl, which means "sailor" in French. It's solid and pretty without sounding like a made-up pastry.

For boys: Elliot, Jude, Jack, Silas, Seth, Felix, Beau, Miles, Declan (too Irish?), Cameron, Everett, Beckett, Calvin and Langston.
posted by zoomorphic at 7:31 PM on January 2, 2010 [2 favorites]


Leo & Molly
posted by Acacia at 7:32 PM on January 2, 2010


We have an Abigail, a Megan, and a Liam.

If we have another I would like to use Finnian for a boy or Cordelia for a girl.
posted by Abbril at 7:38 PM on January 2, 2010 [2 favorites]


You may find these lists of popular names in the United States by decade, and England by year, to be helpful. Note that many of the names on the list aren't actually that common.
posted by Lobster Garden at 7:42 PM on January 2, 2010 [1 favorite]


Common nationally doesn't matter much because there is great regional variance. BabyNameWizard has awesome regional data and other cross-referencing (income, political leanings).

So while no one in your circle of friends is naming their kid Madison and everyone is using Stella, it is due to income, education and region.
posted by k8t at 7:48 PM on January 2, 2010


Rowan and Bronwyn.
posted by MonkeyToes at 8:07 PM on January 2, 2010


The Baby Name Wizard is great for showing name popularity over the years. Dial it back to 1900 and find your gem.

Congratulations!!
posted by heatherann at 8:08 PM on January 2, 2010 [3 favorites]


I suggest checking out the message boards of Baby's Named a Bad Bad Thing. I think they're overly critical of some naming trends, but there are a lot of good lists and suggestions there, especially if you're looking for more classic and/or unusual names.
posted by ghost dance beat at 8:10 PM on January 2, 2010 [2 favorites]


We picked Wyatt for a boy's name during our first pregnancy, inspired by the movie, Wyatt Earp. That was in 2000, she was a girl, we picked something else.

I was in the hospital, recovering from my c-section in spring of 2007. Wyatt was now lying in my arms and my husband and I were so excited to use the name that we had loved for so long and were so thrilled with how strong and yet UNIQUE it was. We were watching the TV in our room when the news that Sheryl Crow had adopted a boy and named him Wyatt came on. Very shortly after, (like within a day or two) Kevin Costner named his new son Caden Wyatt. I was a little irked that MY name had suddenly gotten celeb popular but I got over it. My son has always been named Wyatt, it suits him perfectly and I like to believe that I started the trend. I'll let you use it if you'd like, it's a good one!

Best of luck, whatever you choose will be perfect!!
posted by pearlybob at 8:10 PM on January 2, 2010


Boys - Zephaniah, Chauncey, Rhett, Adlai

Girls - Adelaide, Holland, Joah

Good luck and congratulations on your pregnancy!
posted by mezzanayne at 8:12 PM on January 2, 2010


I think John and Laura are perfectly lovely names. Classic, not screamingly popular, lend themselves to a few non-offensive nicknames (like Jack and, oh, Lulu), and work well with any number of middle names. Just sayin'.

Congratulations!
posted by Lulu's Pink Converse at 8:16 PM on January 2, 2010


Of your list, I really like Imogen and Sebastian the best. I know several Sebastian's who go by Seb, which is definitely not Disney.
posted by roomthreeseventeen at 8:25 PM on January 2, 2010


Do any of these names sound just terrible?

Finn, Wyatt, Jameson. There's no better way to make yourself look like a pretentious fool who's read too many romance novels than to give your child a given name that sounds more like a surname. And the surname-as-given-name trend must be about ready to die, anyway.

If you like 'em old-fashioned and British-sounding, why not take a look at the names of Queen Victoria's nine children?
posted by eatyourcellphone at 8:29 PM on January 2, 2010 [1 favorite]


For a boy:
Duncan, Bentley, Stuart, Byron, Jessie, Julian, Adrian, Axel

Girls:
Sophia, Gia, Zoe, Michella, Elizabeth, Lucy, Julie
posted by JujuB at 8:31 PM on January 2, 2010


Agnes
Louise
Lilian
Maude
Margaret

Dirk
Frank
George
Henry
posted by marimeko at 8:34 PM on January 2, 2010


19th century names in use in my family, as a point of interest: girls: Emmi, Nelle, Lillian, Ethelwynne, May, Lyndell, Jessie, Eliza, Martha, Mariah, Marie Louise, Annette. Boys: Jacob, Adam, William, Joseph, John, Jack, Lindley (plus lots of names from the bible, of course).
posted by gudrun at 8:36 PM on January 2, 2010


ghost dance beat: "I suggest checking out the message boards of Baby's Named a Bad Bad Thing. I think they're overly critical of some naming trends, but there are a lot of good lists and suggestions there, especially if you're looking for more classic and/or unusual names."

Not just the forums... read the site too.
posted by IndigoRain at 8:41 PM on January 2, 2010


Our twins had names fairly early on. About two weeks before they were born, while driving along, we suddenly realized the name we'd decided on for our son wasn't working for us; a new name popped into one of our heads, one we'd not considered, and we both loved it and ran with that instead. Don't stress about it too much if you're not "ready" yet, and there's nothing wrong with looking at 'em once they're out and about and saying "oh, my, you look like a [name here]."
posted by davejay at 8:45 PM on January 2, 2010 [1 favorite]


Jack was the number one name in the UK for something like 10 years straight.

I think Helen is an awesome, solid name with nice connotations and which is seriously under-used.
posted by Rumple at 8:46 PM on January 2, 2010


One more thing: our children's names are also the names of two characters in a well-known movie from the 90s, one we'd never seen, and in the first few weeks there was a lot of "oh, did you name them after that movie"-type hand-waving and such, but that died down quickly and it's never come up again (until this thread.)
posted by davejay at 8:47 PM on January 2, 2010


Steal my grandparents' names: John and Vera.
posted by fairytale of los angeles at 8:50 PM on January 2, 2010


There's no better way to make yourself look like a pretentious fool who's read too many romance novels than to give your child a given name that sounds more like a surname. And the surname-as-given-name trend must be about ready to die, anyway.

Hogwash. Common names like Ashley, Morgan, Brooke, Jordan, Ethan, Connor, James, and Robert originated as surnames. People have been naming kids with surnames for centuries.
posted by zoomorphic at 8:55 PM on January 2, 2010 [1 favorite]


Common names like Ashley, Morgan, Brooke, Jordan, Ethan, Connor, James, and Robert originated as surnames. People have been naming kids with surnames for centuries.
Really? Ethan, James and Robert? I thought Ethan and James were Biblical and Robert was really old. They're first names that became surnames, not the other way around, I think.

I don't like the last-name-as-first-name trend right now, either, just because it seems to be a bit of a cliche at the moment. I'm not opposed in general. It's just super trendy now.
posted by craichead at 9:10 PM on January 2, 2010


Charlotte or Eliza for a girl.
I used the good boy names for my sons, and found boy names ridiculously hard to come across :D

Seconding the baby name voyager!
posted by Joh at 9:10 PM on January 2, 2010


Franny and Zooey?
posted by whitewall at 9:18 PM on January 2, 2010


Earl and Doris. Congratulations!
posted by lakeroon at 9:50 PM on January 2, 2010


I've noticed you named a number of English kings, but missed by favorite royal names: James and Edward (Teddy!). Just adding to the pile.

Oh, and Oliver too, but don't tell anybody I said that name in the same company.

Either way, best of luck!
posted by General Malaise at 9:51 PM on January 2, 2010


That's true about the Biblical origins, craichead, but Ethan, Ashley, Jameson, Connor, Murray, Neal etc are also common last names in Britain. My point is that in no way the trend in surname-christening risen in the past ten years, nor will it die out quickly. My 19th century British relatives had names like Cooper, Astor, Jameson, Gibbons, Darwin, Oliver and Culken.
posted by zoomorphic at 9:57 PM on January 2, 2010


Steal my grandparents' names: John and Vera. (fairytale of los angeles)

ftola, those were my great grandparents' names! (Though he went by Anderson, his middle name, I think.)
posted by ocherdraco at 10:19 PM on January 2, 2010


My brother and I are Charles and Elizabeth, which, of course, I'm partial to.

I have to put in my plug for Elizabeth: classic British, always in the top 20, seldom in the top 10, hard to misspell, only one alternate spelling, and a ton of nicknames.
posted by clerestory at 10:48 PM on January 2, 2010


Constance for a girl.
Tristram for a boy.

those are my favourite ever names....


well, apart from ToddlerTaff and BabyTaff's names... BabyTaff was named with AskMeFi's assistance, by the way. So listen well to these folk.

Oh, and huge congratulations. Twins are lovely. All babies are, but twins are a bit magical.
posted by taff at 11:11 PM on January 2, 2010


Bernard: The meaning of the name is from an Old German compound meaning "bear-hardy", or "brave as a bear".

Bernard/Clara would have splendid alphabetically consecutive ring to it.
posted by Anything at 11:12 PM on January 2, 2010


Justin, Jason, and Jeremy were three neighbour brothers of mine. Mark's quite manly (Biblical, but not obviously so). Timothy? Thomas? (Though if you're Australian you'd be one of a million Toms.) I have a British brother-in-law named Andrew Charles; his dad's David.

I think if you went through the Harry Potter or Enid Blyton character list and omitted the obviously-fantasy names, you might find some Brit-sounding gems.

(My name, Tiara, is up for grabs too, though it's more an English word rather than an English name.)
posted by divabat at 11:34 PM on January 2, 2010


Stephen and Kara
posted by Night_owl at 12:06 AM on January 3, 2010


My friends are having twin girls so I posted this in hopes of finding them some cool names, maybe it will help you. My friend who is due in a week is naming her baby Ava, I think it might be growing in popularity, but it's a great name. Hunter and Scarlet (as in the Johanssons)& emmy and fox are favorites of mine.

This list includes Twins in royal families

* Alexander Helios (b. 40 BC) and Cleopatra Selene II (40 BC-6)
* James II of Scotland (1430-1460) and Alexander Stewart, Duke of Rothesay (1430-1430)- James is a cute girl name
* Princess Louise Élisabeth of France (1727-1759) and Princess Henriette of France (1727-1752)
* Princess Helene and Prince Sergius of Yugoslavia (1963–)
* Jacques, duc d'Orléans and Michel, comte d'Evreux (1941–)
* Prince Jaime, Count of Bardi and Princess Margarita of Bourbon-Parma (1972–)
* Prince Jean and Princess Margaretha of Luxembourg (1957–)
* Lucilla, daughter of Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius; twin brother Gemellus Lucillae
* Princess Sofia and Prince Umberto of Bulgaria (1999–), twin children of Konstantin- Assen, Prince of Vidin.
posted by madmamasmith at 2:01 AM on January 3, 2010


Here is Australia's top 10 names for 2009. Please god, no more Jacks!
posted by taff at 3:15 AM on January 3, 2010


You could have Ada and Charles and then they could fight crime together...

(Secretly, if I were to have children, Ada Lovelace [lastname] would be my choice for a daughter. Because I am that much of a nerd...)
posted by Katemonkey at 4:22 AM on January 3, 2010


Here's a list of the top names in Britain for 2009. Note Ruby is at number two! I think it used to be number one but has slipped.

My favourites:

Boys: Calvin, Harvey, Oliver, Jasper
Girls: Saskia, Millie, Georgia, Lucy, Rossi (don't know where it originates from, but I once knew a girl named Rossi)

FYI - two of my friends each had baby girls in the last few months. The babies were named Pearl and June. Old-fashioned names are definitely making a comeback.

Congratulations!
posted by triggerfinger at 4:35 AM on January 3, 2010


Here are some awesome names from my older-generation families:

John Parmalee
Lulabelle
Charles
Dorothy
Herman
Euphemia (perhaps a bit much but still awesome)
Ruth
Nelson
Eileen
Eugene

I quite like Charles & Dorothy - that's the name of my memaw and her brother and I think they sound great together!
posted by ukdanae at 4:43 AM on January 3, 2010


When we were having twins, we'd picked out Atticus as a possible boy's name (we ended up having two girls, Tabitha and Miranda.) Other old-fashioned names I'm fond of for girls are Chloe, Phoebe, Cherise, and Portia. For boys, Stuart's a very strong name, and if you like British names, Malcolm, Derek, and Duncan are all nice as well.
posted by EarBucket at 7:13 AM on January 3, 2010


I don't have a girl suggestion, but someday I will convince someone to name a boy August Owen and call him Gus for short. My son is Gabe (short for Gabriel), and I love that, but I don't know if it's becoming "common" (he's 16).
posted by ersatzkat at 8:17 AM on January 3, 2010


Please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, please, DO NOT, and I REPEAT DO NOT, give your twins rhyming names or names that sound similar or are spelled similarly but have different pronunciations.

One of the hardest things for twins when growing up is the formation of their own identities and self. This is true more for identical twins than fraternal twins, but it's a crucial and important step in childhood that is often overlooked by moron parents who think that rhyming names are cute.

[Note: I am an identical twin.]
posted by camworld at 8:53 AM on January 3, 2010 [1 favorite]


You could try searching on the UK 1911 census - that would give you an approximation of "British grandparents' names". If you search for a common surname plus a first initial you'll get listings of all the people in the census, which will give you their first names. You'll have to do this through advanced search and click "Names starting with". Or you could choose an uncommon surname and not put a first name in at all. I chose the surname "Potty" - the 28 people with that surname in 1911 were called:

ADA
ALBERT EDWARD
ALFRED
ARTHUR
CHARLES
EDITH
EDWARD
EDWARD JOHN
EDWIN
ELIZA ANN
ELIZABETH MARIA
ELLEN
ETHEL
FRANK ALFRED
FREDERICK WILLIAM
FREDERICK WILLIAM
GEORGE
GEORGE
GEORGE WILLIAM
HELEN
HENRY
HORACE
MARGARET
MARTHA
STEPHEN
VIOLET IVY
WALTER
WILLIAM CHARLES

If you have a connection with a particular part of England or Wales you could add that location to your search. Having said that, most of your names don't sound especially "British" / "English" to me.
posted by paduasoy at 9:16 AM on January 3, 2010


Girls: Eleanor, Phoebe, Louise/Louisa, Daphne, Athena (my middle name, incidentally), Hannah
Boys: Gavin, Quentin, Owen, Nathan/Nathaniel, Griffin, Oliver, Alexander, William

I had a friend in first grade whose mother was named Wren, which I think is so beautiful and unusual.

Please don't name them Victoria and Albert.
posted by apricot at 9:23 AM on January 3, 2010


I love your taste! Here are my favorites that would fit your criteria:

Georgianna, Marian, Ivy, Theodora, Ruth, Martha, Alice, Jane, Agatha, Genevieve (call her Evie), Gemma, Lydia, Syliva

Oliver, Frederick, Isaac, Augustus (Gus or Gusto), Stuart, Frank(lin), Wallace

Finally, though it pains me that my husband has already vetoed it as it is far and away my favorite girl name - I offer Beatrix for your consideration. I adore it for her sake, but also there aren't enough names with Xs in them.

Have fun, do let us know your choices when the two arrive!
posted by nelleish at 11:39 AM on January 3, 2010


Entering my surname into the 1911 thingie came up with some funny options. Egbert, anyone? But there are a couple of good choices. Has anyone mentioned Alec? There are a lot of Claras, Edwards, Henrys and Georges. What about Winifred? Edith?

A lot of the names there sound old-person-ish in a bad way to me: I don't think that Stanley or Ethyl have really come back around again. But maybe it's time for them, too.
posted by craichead at 11:58 AM on January 3, 2010


Beatrice and Benedict?
posted by pentagoet at 12:00 PM on January 3, 2010


Other british female names: Emma, Hannah, Alwyn, Addison, Adele, Lydia, Evelyn, Greta, Olivia, Mathilde. Just don't go too old-fashion and end up with Millicent or Hortense. Or do, whatever, your kid!

Strong british male names: Stuart (great pick), Alexander, Anderson, Thomas, James, Jacob, Dylan, Bryan, Alban (supposedly -an means "strong" in gaelic)
posted by Juicy Avenger at 4:39 PM on January 3, 2010


Rowena and Walter.
Amelia and Errol.
Sybil and David
Matilda and Simon

With opposite gender twins I think it is beneficial to give the boy a name that will not be confused for a girl's name easily and the girl should not be gender neutral either. The "using old-fashioned names" trend is HUGE right now, so be forewarned your child probably will not have a unique name unless you appropriate a more recent trend (I don't know any Tiffany's, Brittney's or Cody's under ten for example).

You should do something badass with the middle name though like a palindrome. Who notices middle names anyways (says the mother of three children with five names each).
posted by saucysault at 4:46 PM on January 3, 2010


I like grandmotherly names too! I think Edie is really cute but it seems more like a nickname - for Edith maybe? I also like Eleonore, with Ellie for short.

I wouldn't use Noel for a boy because he's going to get called "Noelle"

Sorry ukdanae, nobody should be saddled with Euphemia!
posted by radioamy at 5:22 PM on January 3, 2010


Susan or Sue! My Brit mother-in-law is a Sue and so are a number of people on her side of the tree.

Louise, Patricia, Caroline, Bronnie, Angela?
posted by divabat at 6:31 PM on January 3, 2010


Yes, Edie is short for Edith.


Felicity and Julian.
posted by brujita at 11:12 PM on January 3, 2010


Owen and Audrey
posted by Toecutter at 11:20 PM on January 3, 2010


Mary Alice
Mary Frances
Thomas Martin
Frank Benjaman
those are some of my faves
posted by meeshell at 11:21 AM on January 4, 2010


My top two names: Elliot and Cordelia (my daughter's name is Cordelia, and I get lots of compliments on it).
Alternates: Charlotte, Persephone for a girl and Edward or Pierson for a boy.
posted by mrstrotsky at 10:46 AM on January 5, 2010


zoomorphic:Hogwash. Common names like Ashley, Morgan, Brooke, Jordan, Ethan, Connor, James, and Robert originated as surnames. People have been naming kids with surnames for centuries.

Hogwash yourself. Firstly, you are wrong to claim all of these names derive from surnames - Robert, James and Ethan definitely do not. And I didn't say surnames as given names were a new phenomenon, simply that their popularity has increased, which it certainly has. Go to the US Social Security Administration's baby names area and compare top 50 names from the 1970s and the 2000s, and you will be able to verify the significant recent increase in the popularity of these names yourself.

These sorts of names have always existed - but they've experienced a boom, and popular fads always pass. They will sound very ordinary in twenty to thirty years, and they will date quickly, in the same way the super-popular 70s name Jennifer has. And, though this offends you, it is true that these sorts of names pop up in soap operas and romance novels, and that these sorts of names derive much of their cachet from the fact that using surnames as given names was once strongly associated with the upper classes, who would use a mother's maiden name, or the surname of a socially prestigious relative, as a given name, usually for a boy.

Obviously this is just my opinion, but to me these names are associated with social climbers and the unimaginative. Sorry if that bothers you.
posted by eatyourcellphone at 5:42 AM on January 6, 2010 [1 favorite]


Well, I'm partial to things like Edwin (very masculine yet English and not very common these days), Dorothy, Evangeline and Jasper.
posted by Unicorn on the cob at 9:34 PM on January 11, 2010 [1 favorite]


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