How do I prevent pizza dough from forming big gas bubbles in the oven?
June 20, 2009 12:14 PM   Subscribe

How do I prevent pizza dough from forming big gas bubbles in the oven?
posted by markcmyers to Home & Garden (16 answers total) 4 users marked this as a favorite
 
Bread will do the same thing if it isn't kneaded properly. Just keep at it.
posted by valkyryn at 12:18 PM on June 20, 2009


Yeah, my first thought was when the recipe says knead for ten minutes, make sure you knead for ten minutes.
posted by ORthey at 12:19 PM on June 20, 2009


It may be inevitable to some degree. When I worked for a pizza place, we had a big long fork to stick through a little window in the side of the oven to pop the bubbles as they came up.
posted by dilettante at 12:20 PM on June 20, 2009


I was taught that lightly perforating the surface of the dough with a fork or some similar utensil before baking the crust will prevent that, and experience has held this to be true. Then, if you're doing a two-step baking process (crust, then the whole pizza), when you take the crust out to apply the sauce and toppings, stab any areas that seem to be puffing up (or are a little thicker and could easily puff up) with a fork as well.

On preview, make sure you knead enough too.
posted by ThyroidBob at 12:20 PM on June 20, 2009 [3 favorites]


What's wrong with bubbles? That's where the gelatinization of the dough is best!
posted by foooooogasm at 12:21 PM on June 20, 2009 [4 favorites]


If you're getting "big" bubbles in your dough, you knead, er need to knead it longer. The elastic bands of the dough will form smaller air pockets the longer you knead, leading to the pizza crust's texture being more uniformly even.

(Many years making homemade pizza here....)
posted by Lynsey at 12:26 PM on June 20, 2009


It may be inevitable to some degree. When I worked for a pizza place, we had a big long fork to stick through a little window in the side of the oven to pop the bubbles as they came up.

Ditto. When we'd open the oven to take out one pizza, or rotate the ones that were in there, we'd check for giant bubbles and pop the really ridiculous ones.

It might also depend on how long your dough's been sitting around - where I worked, we'd usually make a batch of dough a day (or two on weekends), and the dough we used at the end of the day or at the beginning of the next day would be getting pretty spongy by that point, even though we kept it refrigerated (there was nothing wrong with the dough - it had just had a lot of time to rise), so that might be a factor as well. Note that a lot of mass-market pizza places use pre-made dough that gets shipped to them instead of making their own, which probably makes for fewer bubbles; or it might be that they roll out the dough instead of tossing it, or something to do with using a conveyor belt oven instead of a standard one; but that's just conjecture.
posted by LionIndex at 12:29 PM on June 20, 2009


Dock it with a pizza docker. You can pick one up from your local gourmet kitchen store and if they don't have it, ask them to special order one for you.
posted by priested at 12:32 PM on June 20, 2009 [1 favorite]


Yeah, you want to "dock" the non-crust parts, either with a pizza docker or just with a fork. It's easiest to do it right before you put the sauce on; just put a ton of tiny little holes all over.
posted by rossination at 12:45 PM on June 20, 2009


Just pop the bubbles and put a little extra cheese over them. The cheese keeps the now extra thin part from burning.
posted by gally99 at 12:50 PM on June 20, 2009


What is your pizza dough recipe? I find that kneading the dough once, refrigerating it overnight and then taking it out for a couple hours before using it, then kneading it once more right before using it -- yields good results. Also make sure your dough is the right consistency -- springy and not sticky -- wet dough will yield more bubbles. Good luck!
posted by MaddyRex at 1:10 PM on June 20, 2009


Dough docker after tossing the crust.
posted by crapmatic at 1:47 PM on June 20, 2009


Make sure you're proofing the dough adequately.
posted by torquemaniac at 2:00 PM on June 20, 2009


Kneed it lots and go at it with a fork.
posted by devilsbrigade at 5:13 PM on June 20, 2009


kneading is important. so is a very hot pizza stone in a very hot oven. if your oven is anything less than at maximum temperature crank it up. on the stone (pre-heated to 550) I never get significant bubbles.
posted by caddis at 7:25 PM on June 20, 2009


As soon as my pizza dough (rising as I type, incidentally) goes on a stone or a pan, I attack it with a fork. That sounds violent, but it shouldn't be. Hold the fork by the very end of the handle and make the tines bounce off the stone/pan that the dough is now on. The operation should resemble tapping a pen on a desk like a drum stick. Takes about a minute to do the whole thing, if not shorter. Don't worry about the fork penetrating too far (i.e., don't intentionally rip all the way through the dough and, if you do, it doesn't matter because the dough will rise to fill up the holes and prevent sauce from dripping through during the cooking process)
posted by msbrauer at 12:29 AM on June 23, 2009


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