Help our Pomeranian's Paws!
January 8, 2009 6:06 AM   Subscribe

What are some recommended Joint Supplements for a Pomeranian mix (17 lbs)?

Our doctor warned us that the breed is susceptible to arthritis and at one point in time surgery might be needed. Are there any canine supplements, preferably in a tasty form, that could make our dog's life easier?

He is a 6 year old, 17lbs Pomeranian, possibly mixed with Eskimo (Pomino), we don't know, since he was a rescue. He likes to run around the house a lot. Unfortunately we have hardwood floors and he often slips, which the doctor said could cause joint damage. In the morning he stretches a lot, and she said that could be an early sign of arthritis as well. So we want to provide him with the best protection now, for a better life when he gets old.
We feed him Purina Dog Chow dry food.
posted by spacefire to Pets & Animals (13 answers total) 1 user marked this as a favorite
 
First thing I would suggest is a new dog food. Purina Dog Chow's first ingredient is corn. It is a filler, dogs don't digest corn well. It just passes through him. There is a lot of opinion out there about which dog foods are good and bad, but corn being not good for dogs is pretty universally accepted I believe.

I'd check with a Vet before giving any supplements, but one to look into might be Glucosamine. My daughter gives it to her horse to support joint health, and humans take it to for the same reason. I would guess it is also effective on dogs, but check that with a real medical professional!
posted by COD at 6:37 AM on January 8, 2009


This company should have some stuff perhaps this page can help?
posted by Max Power at 7:01 AM on January 8, 2009


Don't feed him kibble/processed garbage. Raw food is the best diet. Not a "Raw Food Dog Food", literally, raw food. Raw chicken, raw beef. Bones are fine in raw meat, the dog won't choke.

Do that and you won't need any supplementation. He also won't smell doggy or have nasty breath.

Good luck!
posted by aleahey at 8:07 AM on January 8, 2009


Take a look at this comment for ideas on a different food - http://ask.metafilter.com/110675/Raw-diet-for-dogs-pros-and-cons#1592815

I don't know that person, but s/he sounds like s/he knows what s/he is talking about, maybe they wouldn't mind a MeMail about supplements if they don't weigh in here?

Also, if you have a local/independent pet store, it is probably worth stopping in and asking some advice.
posted by KAS at 8:15 AM on January 8, 2009


In addition to a change of diet, I give my dog Joint MAX Triple Strength supplements. They contain Glucosamine HCl, Chondroitin Sulfate, MethylSulfonylMethane (MSM), and a bunch of other fun stuff. Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) and Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) also are in there and are helpful. I chose the Triple Strength because I wanted a high enough dosage in a single soft treat given my dog's weight. I'd go with the Double Strength for a 17lb dog. You can buy it online.

The food I give her now is from Orijen. It's grain-free. You could check the Orijen or Innova websites for dealers and then ask them. Dealers will usually carry a fairly wide variety of the grain-free brands and can help you choose one.

Raw food works, too, from what I understand.
posted by pandanom at 8:39 AM on January 8, 2009


My dogs love the Zuke's.
posted by spilon at 9:21 AM on January 8, 2009


Thank you for all the answers so far.
I need to clarify though that our dog also has a very sensitive stomach. The Purina food is, so far, the only one that we tested that allows for regular, solid stool.
We had him on the bland diet after an incident when he got sick after eating too many treats, and he had diahreea until we switched back to Purina.
That is why we would prefer he stays on that, but we do want to supplement his food with vitamins and minerals, preferably some that he would also enjoy the taste of.
posted by spacefire at 9:42 AM on January 8, 2009


Even dogs with "normal" stomachs sometimes revolt on a food change. You need to work it in slowly. Mix 75% Purina and 25% new food for a week, then 50/50 for a week, the 25/75 for a week, then finally all new food.
posted by COD at 10:17 AM on January 8, 2009


Costco.com has a supplement that is very reasonble priced and may work for you. I give these to our German Shepherd. Our little dog has arthritis and our vet sold us something that was pretty expensive. When we ran out I found this at Costco.com also. They have twice the amount of active ingredients that the other stuff she was taking had so I cut them in half and give her one half per day. They really do make her feel a lot better! One last thing I that Costco.com sells that our dogs love love love is Salmon Oil! A great product.
posted by snowjoe at 12:19 PM on January 8, 2009


Seconding Costco supplements, which offer very good value for money. For our old dog, a 14-year-old border collie mix, we used Drs Foster & Smith joint supplements, which appeared to help him quite a bit. This company has a very good reputation.
Another thing that helped more than the supplements was getting a few wool rugs, with non-slip pads underneath. Our dog really appreciated the grip that these gave and obviously headed for the rug path around the room (you need one right in front of where you sit, so the dog can come close easily). It was a small price to pay, to make him comfortable.
posted by Susurration at 6:37 PM on January 8, 2009


Don't waste your money.
posted by tiburon at 8:38 PM on January 8, 2009


@tiburon...

please elaborate?
posted by spacefire at 10:55 AM on January 9, 2009


Vitamins/minerals/dietary supplements are, generally speaking, a waste of money. A balanced diet, just like with us, includes all of the dogs dietary requirements. The joint supplements are snake oil and an interesting way to bilk you out of $20+ for a bottle of nothing.

The main ingredients in them are Glucosamine and Chondroitin, which studies have shown to prove no benefit. People tend to think it works because they're under the misguided assumption that since chondroitin sulfate is required structurally in your dogs joints (and yours, too), ingesting some of it would be beneficial.

Its something like feeding your three-legged dog a dog's leg.
posted by aleahey at 6:37 AM on January 19, 2009 [1 favorite]


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