what is the correct term for musician jump kick
September 28, 2008 5:27 AM   Subscribe

What should I call it when a band is finishing a song and the guitarist hits the last chord while jumping in the air and jack knifing his/her legs back?

I guess it's a way of putting an exclamation mark on the song, and, I suppose, to make sure that the other members of the band know that the song is ending here and not going around again. Should I just call it a "jump kick" or is there some preferred term among musicians. Any other insights into this practice are welcome, since I'm not a musician. This is for a documentary.
posted by planetkyoto to Media & Arts (17 answers total) 2 users marked this as a favorite
 
Back scissor jump?
posted by watercarrier at 5:51 AM on September 28, 2008


I would say that it's not a universal trait - in some bands a nod is sufficient to let the other members know that this is the penultimate chord, which is promptly stretched out and made as long as possible to keep the applause. As far as the best term to use to describe the aforementioned pose, watercarrier says it best: back scissor jump, or simply a scissor jump.
posted by chrisinseoul at 6:05 AM on September 28, 2008


Its called copying Pete Townshend.

So you might want to call it a Pete Townshend-style jump.

Musicians have no name for it.
posted by Ironmouth at 6:08 AM on September 28, 2008 [1 favorite]


Masterbanding.
posted by buzzman at 6:09 AM on September 28, 2008


"The Pete Townsend"
posted by jammy at 6:12 AM on September 28, 2008


poop! Ironmouth beat me to it... oh well, good pics in the links anyways

but I will say that I have heard musicians call it precisely that, so some of them do have a name for it
posted by jammy at 6:14 AM on September 28, 2008


The DLR - as in, the David Lee Roth jump-kick?
posted by insouciant at 6:18 AM on September 28, 2008


spelled his name wrong too :(
posted by jammy at 6:22 AM on September 28, 2008


Yeah, Townsend did it first, but DLR would so kick Townsends ass in a jump kick match.

Oh, and I'm not sure there is a universally recognized term for the move you describe, but there's probably at least a shorter way to describe it- either by invoking the likes of DLR or just saying "scissor kick to put a close on the final note" (i'm sucks at writer).
posted by p3t3 at 6:32 AM on September 28, 2008


I came in here to call it the Townshend. I see I am not needed. Bye.
posted by rokusan at 6:34 AM on September 28, 2008


I'm going to coin a phrase and call it a "rock hurkey".
posted by qwip at 6:44 AM on September 28, 2008


Thanks much, guys. I'm no music expert, but Pete Townshend is who I thought of as the example. I didn't know that the move is essentially identified with him. This is for a story about musician in my town who's having his 50th anniversary fronting his band this year, but still does that move at age 67. Whoa, looking up Pete Townshend just now on Wikipedia, he's already 63. Thanks again.
posted by planetkyoto at 7:14 AM on September 28, 2008


not to be pedantic (well, maybe a little) but I really don't think you should call it a scissor kick in your documentary - a scissor kick involves your legs going in opposite directions (opening like a pair of scissors), like so

when you jack knife your legs, you bend them both at the knees (like a jack knife closes), so that your heels go towards your butt, like so
posted by jammy at 8:45 AM on September 28, 2008


I gave chris a best answer for the info on timing.
posted by planetkyoto at 8:49 AM on September 28, 2008


Pete Townshend may have been known to do it, but I don't feel like the move is necessarily associated with him anymore. As someone who has been known to perform this maneuver, I'd call it a rock jump.
posted by ludwig_van at 8:49 AM on September 28, 2008


...wait, I don't think that the move Pete Townsend is specifically known for is what is being described, though. Pete Townsend was basically doing a mid-air split, but we're talking about both legs going back so you're kicking your own butt, basically. Right?
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 9:01 AM on September 28, 2008


...wait, I don't think that the move Pete Townsend is specifically known for is what is being described, though. Pete Townsend was basically doing a mid-air split

Mr. Townshend does all sorts of jumps & kicks - I think what he's known for, or why he's being referenced in this thread, is how so many of The Who's songs end on crashing power chords & Pete so often emphasizes this by jumping up so he comes down at the same time as the final chord

of course, what he's really known for is the windmill (starts at 0:30 - nice buncha jumps right after)

and yes, that's more than anyone here ever asked for, I know - I'll shut up now

(except to say thanks for asking this question, planetkyoto! I've been listening to The Who all day now & it's really cheered me up)
posted by jammy at 10:59 AM on September 28, 2008


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