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143 posts tagged with slang.
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Where does term "pissed off" come from?

Where does the term "pissed off" come from? Doesn't seem to be related to being angry. You are more likely to piss your pants when you are scared.
posted by zackdog on Aug 3, 2006 - 18 answers

What are some slang words for a hangover?

Looking for slang words for a hangover. [more inside]
posted by jon_kill on Jul 19, 2006 - 43 answers

May I ask a (German) favor?

What's a "German Favor"? [more inside]
posted by maryh on Jul 16, 2006 - 13 answers

Hope me, Humbert Humbert!

Slang term for statutory rape laws? [more inside]
posted by Arthur "Two Sheds" Jackson on Jul 5, 2006 - 21 answers

"Barnacle" code?

What does "barnacle code" mean to programmers? [more inside]
posted by pax digita on May 31, 2006 - 9 answers

flute shops?

Please help an American out with British slang: what is a flute shop? [more inside]
posted by pasici on May 26, 2006 - 19 answers

What's the deal with the popularity of Moonbat?

Explain to me the popularity of "moonbat." [more inside]
posted by Astro Zombie on May 24, 2006 - 20 answers

Where does "for those of you following along at home" come from?

What's the origin of the phrase "For those of you [playing/following/scoring] along at home?" [more inside]
posted by AgentRocket on Apr 28, 2006 - 23 answers

What are the hep cats spoutin'?

What's the new word for "cool"? [more inside]
posted by team lowkey on Apr 19, 2006 - 152 answers

Spanish Raver SlangFliter:

Does anyone know a colloquial Spanish (/dialect irrelevant) term equivalent to 'Tripping," as in "being under the influence of a hallucinogenic drug?"
posted by gnomicPerfect on Mar 16, 2006 - 17 answers

Oh stewardess, I speak jive

Is the phrase "Jive Turkey" offensive? [more inside]
posted by Who_Am_I on Mar 2, 2006 - 30 answers

European phrase?

I've noticed when reading European books translated into English, the turn of phrase "Do sex" or "sex each other" etc. Is this an accurate translation, or is it a watered down translation for the tradionial f-word in American English? British books sometimes feature it as well. Are both phrases used in Europe? Is there a difference in meaning?
posted by rainbaby on Feb 16, 2006 - 19 answers

What do waiters call regular customers?

Does anyone know any slang that waiters/waitresses use to refer to regular customers other than the obvious "regulars"?
posted by saraswati on Jan 20, 2006 - 17 answers

A speaker by any other name?

What's a nickname for the speakers on a stereo? [more inside]
posted by Gucky on Jan 12, 2006 - 21 answers

Colorful language from the American South

My grandfather was from the Deep South, and his speech was very colorful. He used the word "epizootics" to describe any kind of flu-like illness. I realize this is a real word, used to describe epidemics in the animal world. But he pronounced it differently, "eppa-zoo-tiks." Or sometimes he said "eppa-zoo-ti-kus." Has anyone else heard this before? Would this be considered slang, or an idiom, etc? [more inside]
posted by shifafa on Jan 12, 2006 - 12 answers

Was it not Plato who observed that he who smelt it dealt it?

We were discussing the source of playground rhymes/mythology/logic. Is there an example of a piece of nationally or internationally popular playground lore we can trace to a specific author?
posted by Protocols of the Elders of Awesome on Jan 2, 2006 - 8 answers

Idioms poster

Please help me find a print depicting idioms and slang. [more inside]
posted by MrMulan on Dec 13, 2005 - 2 answers

What's the etymology of "gully"?

What's the etymology of "gully" (as in "street", "badass")? Thanks.
posted by matteo on Dec 4, 2005 - 11 answers

Starlight == Medic to the Brits?

Is "Starlight" some form of British slang for "Medic"? [more inside]
posted by disillusioned on Nov 29, 2005 - 15 answers

What's a male "Betty" called?

My friend DJ just got a snowboard with a pretty girl painted on it, and she's named it "Betty" after the surfer slang for a good-looking woman. What's the equivalent to "Betty" in surfer lingo to describe a good-looking man?
posted by Mozai on Nov 7, 2005 - 16 answers

prison slang!

I'm looking for a slang word/phrase used to describe a false bar in a prison cell. The idea is that when a prison was built/expanded by inmate labor, workers would loosen one bar before it'd set too solidly in cement to make a potential escape hatch. What would inmates call this? [more inside]
posted by soviet sleepover on Oct 18, 2005 - 6 answers

Identifying slang

Identify that slang! "Gribnodes" used to refer to snackfoods, particularly snackfoods that one serves in small bowls at a party, like nuts or chexmix. [more inside]
posted by crush-onastick on Sep 5, 2005 - 8 answers

What's a coffee an' ?

In James T. Farrell's novel The Young Manhood of Studs Lonigan (1934), Studs's favorite beverage of choice (other than booze) is a coffee an'. What is a coffee an' ?
posted by Prospero on Jul 15, 2005 - 7 answers

Bridge and Tunnel crowd

I just learned the term "bridge and tunnel crowd" which refers to people from the suburbs who come out on the weekends to the Manhattan [more inside]
posted by hokie409 on Jun 8, 2005 - 26 answers

Recommendations for fiction to help new U.S. citizen learn modern slang?

A smart Venezuelan acquaintance is looking for fiction to help improve his understanding of current American idioms and slang. [more inside]
posted by mediareport on Jun 5, 2005 - 11 answers

What the heck is a "Grease-man"?

My friends and I were talking about building a cabin up North, and then we started talking like it was a 'heist' or a 'job', if you get the picture. So we designated someone as the Wheel-man, and someone else as the Grease-man, and then I asked: what's a grease-man? No one actually knew. I tried Google to no avail. Does anyone know what a Grease-man is? Are there any other *-man titles you can think up for a heist?
posted by indiebass on Apr 13, 2005 - 39 answers

What's a "hollaback girl"?

I'm embarrassed to ask, but what's a "Hollaback Girl" (that which Gwen Stefani ain't)?
posted by puddinghead on Apr 3, 2005 - 4 answers

Origin of the term meatspace?

Where did the term "meatspace" originate? I know it entered the OED in 2000 (alongside "gaydar," "cybersquatting" and "Frankenfood"), and I see The Word Spy credits a 1995 article about John Perry Barlow as the "earliest citation," but I think I saw it in cyberpunk sci-fi before that. Anyone got an earlier appearance than 1995? [more inside]
posted by mediareport on Mar 2, 2005 - 24 answers

What does natch mean?

What does 'natch mean? Origins? Uses? [more inside]
posted by asterisk on Feb 23, 2005 - 35 answers

Shay?

[OffensiveSlangFilter] What exactly does "shay," as in "shay whitey," mean? From whence does it come?
posted by callmejay on Jan 25, 2005 - 7 answers

Help with Edwardian slang I don't know how to spell?

Edwardian slang. I'm in the midst of an Upstairs Downstairs marathon and the daughter of the house keeps using a word that sounds like "deevee" and apparently means something like "cool." I've googled (hard when you don't know the spelling) and gone through online dictionaries of Victorian and Edwardian slang, but no luck on what it means or the derivation. Can anyone enlighten me?
posted by helcat on Jan 1, 2005 - 22 answers

Is there a good online dictionary of idioms and phrases?

Is there a good online dictionary of idioms and phrases? I know there are online thesauri, but they don't have the colorful expressions from the original Roget's I.
posted by inksyndicate on Dec 16, 2004 - 6 answers

Deciphering Arabic

LanguageFilter: Any Arabic speakers here? I'm trying to decipher an Arabic phrase: "Baashake ya halo." I might have spelled it wrong, but I know it's not a common Arabic phrase so much as it is slang. Any ideas?
posted by symphonik on Dec 12, 2004 - 9 answers

Explain da Massive, if you could help a brother out

I was watching da Ali G movie the other night, and the bit at the beginning where his "West Side Massive" faces off against the "East Side Massive" got me wondering: what the heck is a "massive"? I've heard the term used in similar contexts, but can't seem to Google or Wiki up any explanation. Respec!
posted by schoolgirl report on Dec 4, 2004 - 9 answers

What's the provenance of "Oh, snap!"?

Usually I'm pretty "hep" to the "lingo" you kids use, but will someone tell this clueless geezer the provenance of "Oh, snap!"? (sorry, that's it, no more inside)
posted by briank on Oct 6, 2004 - 36 answers

CanadianSlangFilter: What is a "tucker"?

CanadianSlangFilter: What is a "tucker"? [more inside]
posted by milovoo on Jul 16, 2004 - 20 answers

Public Enemy lyrics

I'm listening to some Public Enemy MP3s and it has ocurred to me that I don't know, nor have I ever known, what "cold lampin'" means or refers to. Anyone?
posted by archimago on Jul 15, 2004 - 12 answers

Is gaf/gaff/gaffe slang for "party"?

I checked every slang dictionary I could find to no avail. Does anyone else use "gaf", "gaff", or "gaffe" as slang for "party" or "get-together"?
posted by Kwantsar on Apr 21, 2004 - 8 answers

What's the origin of the phrase "bleeding deacons"?

Could someone please explain what the phrase "bleeding deacons" means ?
posted by sgt.serenity on Apr 14, 2004 - 13 answers

What exactly /is/ a half and half?

Not to display (again) my ridiculous naivete, but what exactly is a half and half? [more inside]
posted by LittleMissCranky on Mar 28, 2004 - 8 answers

What was this Polish word my grandmother used?

anyone speak polish? my grandmother used to have a word (most likely not a nice one) for what my irish grandfather referred to as "chippies"--young women, tight pants, high heels, bright lipstick. not *bad* girls, per se, but not nice ones either. i'm thinking it might have been "cichodjka" (more or less pronounced: tsyhodyeh'kah) but my aunt says no, that doesn't sound right to her.
posted by crush-onastick on Jan 20, 2004 - 7 answers

What is the origin of the slang term beeyotch?

What is the origin of the slang term beeyotch (not sure I spelled it right.) [more inside]
posted by konolia on Jan 12, 2004 - 22 answers

Helpdesk Lingo

One for the helpdesk [hopedesk!] folks: when one is referred to as "starfish", is it a reference to being a butthole, or does it mean one is so low on the food chain they have no brain (like arms + legs + head = 5 appendages)? Neither?
posted by yoga on Jan 2, 2004 - 3 answers

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