12 posts tagged with meaning and Language.
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More examples of a specific type of metaphorical 'pun' in song lyrics?

I really like metaphors and I really like song lyrics. Every once in a while I run across a particular type of cleverly extended metaphor in a song lyric. I'm trying to develop this idea a bit and looking for more examples of this particular thing. I've included some explanatory examples I've found. [more inside]
posted by iamkimiam on Jun 22, 2013 - 17 answers

Touché

I think I don't understand the meaning, in English, of "touché." [more inside]
posted by Snarl Furillo on Mar 17, 2013 - 32 answers

I deserve to ask a question because I paid my $5.

What does it mean to "deserve" something? [more inside]
posted by Pastor of Muppets on Jun 16, 2011 - 36 answers

"satavaziru"... what does it mean!?

A guy in Tallinn pointed at me and said something that sounded like "satavaziru!" (emphasis on the "zi" syllable). What might that mean? [more inside]
posted by mokudekiru on Apr 13, 2011 - 12 answers

Sacrifice, speech, writing and art

Sacrifice, speech, writing and art: I am interested in the different ways in which a sacrifice, a sacrament, a spoken word and a written word act as signifiers. The notion for instance that the sacrament, at the point of its acceptance, is understood as becoming the signified. What can you tell me / what has been written about the notions of sacrifice and their relationship to speech, art and the technologies of writing? [more inside]
posted by 0bvious on Feb 24, 2010 - 8 answers

"Twin" Translation

I am looking for translations for the words "twin" and "sister". I have used babelfish and other sites but really want the pronunciation not just foreign writings I can't decipher. Also, translations in other languages not listed such as different Native American tribal translations. Help?!
posted by madmamasmith on Oct 14, 2009 - 24 answers

Same sentence, different language, still makes sense?

Are they any sentences that can be said in one language, but also understood in a different language (albeit with a different meaning)? [more inside]
posted by devnull on Jul 7, 2009 - 42 answers

Looking for contextual understanding of Hebrews 10:23

Seeking advice about a quote from Hebrews 10:23, which states "Let us hold fast the confession of our hope without wavering, for he who promised is faithful." This is from one of the books of the New Testament (Epistle to the Hebrews). [more inside]
posted by iamkimiam on Nov 29, 2008 - 9 answers

Looking up ancient Greek words

What resources are available to investigate the meaning of a philosophical term in ancient Greek? I'm looking for something far more detailed than just a dictionary or a translation of a passage--I'd like to be aware of the shades of meaning and nuances of use, historical baggage, etc. In case some context is helpful, there are a couple of Greek terms that might be useful as metaphors in a dissertation, but I want to make sure that I know all the ways that the terms might be taken when designing the metaphor. The catch is that I don't speak any Greek, either ancient or modern; however, resources in English, French, Spanish, and German are all options.
posted by philosophygeek on Nov 24, 2008 - 8 answers

Common use of Japanese 'Mu' Prefix

I am looking for interesting uses of the prefix 'mu' (無) in Japanese. I want to find an example of mu's general use that attains to its meaning as -less or an absence of. The example I have currently, 無線 'musen' meaning 'wireless', is a little boring. [more inside]
posted by 0bvious on Aug 8, 2008 - 14 answers

A single word which means "negatively defined"?

Is there a single word which means "negatively defined" (or "defined by its opposite" or "defined by not being other things" or "defined by the absence of something")? In English if you can manage (I cannot think of one), but maybe in another language? German perhaps?
posted by unknowncommand on Apr 7, 2006 - 22 answers

Krelboyne

What does "krelboyne" mean? The smart kids in the gifted class on the show Malcolm in the Middle are called that. I've googled to no avail. [more, in the middle] [more inside]
posted by littlegirlblue on Feb 1, 2005 - 7 answers

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