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Give me your most jargon-filled work-related statements

I love jargon, especially among sub-genres of things. This week a web developer friend uttered a sentence about frameworks and databases that made sense but sounded so ridiculous I had to stop and ask him to repeat it. I'd like to hear more of these. Please give me the most jargon-filled sentence that you might have uttered at work in the past few weeks and made complete sense to coworkers, but sounds utterly ridiculous to outsiders, and state what your occupation/context was for it.
posted by mathowie on Aug 14, 2014 - 33 answers

Latin legal phrase?

Does anyone know the Latin (?) phrase for when a judge authors both an opinion AND a special companion opinion (concurrence or dissent)?
posted by mmiddle on Jul 22, 2013 - 10 answers

I had some really encouraging fellowship last night...

Despite having no ties to the community beyond a few old facebook friends and the blogs they link to, I'm fascinated by the language quirks of modern conservative Christianity. Less so the specifically theological terms (washed in the blood, new life, etc.), but more how particular words and turns of phrase mark the speaker as belonging to the community even when they are not talking about premillenialism. [more inside]
posted by heyforfour on Jan 17, 2013 - 49 answers

What does the phrase "accounting logic" mean, particularly as used in the new book Monoculture?

I'm reading the book Monoculture by FS Michaels, which describes how what the author calls "the economic story," which she sees as dominant in our culture and as having replaced earlier dominant stories rooted in religion and science, is shaping people's work, communities, education, and relationships. In the book, Michaels talks about how "as the economic story spreads to government, a language based on economics develops along with a new way of thinking and reasoning about what goes on in government -- a kind of accounting logic. That accounting logic makes two assumptions: first, that anything and everything your government does can be assessed in terms of what value is added, and second, that the value added can be linked to how much money is spent on the activity in the first place." Etc. My question is: in this context, what does the phrase "accounting logic" mean? [more inside]
posted by Susan PG on Jul 7, 2012 - 5 answers

Useful idioms

Business idioms that are actually useful? [more inside]
posted by AceRock on Jun 29, 2012 - 31 answers

Like awesome dude... Slang from the 90s

Looking for examples of late 20th century slang/lingo has fallen out of common usage? [more inside]
posted by kreestar on Apr 18, 2012 - 55 answers

I do not think it means what you think it means.

What is some bizarre and amusing industry-specific jargon? [more inside]
posted by holterbarbour on Feb 16, 2012 - 53 answers

Harnessing without jargon?

A textbook that I once read contained a passage from some famous author (possibly Mark Twain?) that attempted to illustrate the usefulness of jargon by describing how to saddle a horse, or hitch a horse to a wagon (something like that) without using any specialized terminology. It was marvelously long-winded and impossible to follow. Textbook long since discarded, Google-Fu fails; any idea what this might have been?
posted by lordcorvid on Jul 2, 2011 - 3 answers

Saying sugar and yelling your full name: southern or not?

Two questions about vocabulary in the American South and elsewhere: did your parents call you sugar and did they, when you were in trouble, use both your first and middle names to summon you for the reckoning? [more inside]
posted by mygothlaundry on Jun 2, 2011 - 81 answers

My next question will be more interesting, I promise.

What does "for sale in one line" and a "gross" quote for lease rental mean in the context of Australia's real estate market? [more inside]
posted by aherdofturtles on Dec 5, 2010 - 9 answers

There's academia and there's ...?

Academic Grant Writing logjam filter. Final moments before I must submit and I need a word for my rousing conclusion. How the hell do academics refer to the outside/real world? [example over the fold] [more inside]
posted by philip-random on Oct 5, 2010 - 11 answers

Why doesn't the OED have better coverage of mathematical terms?

Why doesn't the OED have better coverage of mathematical terms? Is this an area they want to improve on, or have they drawn a line of obscurity somewhere that just leaves out more than I expected? [more inside]
posted by ErWenn on Oct 5, 2010 - 9 answers

Where is this tech jargon joke?

I vaguely remember a joke, probably from the mid to late 90s, in which two technologists are speaking. The start out in English, using more and more tech jargon as the conversation progresses, until they end up speaking in ones and zeros. I would now like to reference this fictional conversation, but can't find it. Can anyone source my vague memory?
posted by scottreynen on Jul 20, 2010 - 14 answers

the language barrier

You're talking to some people about computers when you realize that somehow, they know even less than you do. How do you figure out what they need to hear? How do you phrase it clearly, simply and accurately, but not condescendingly? How do you know when you're screwing that up, and how do you recover? And conversely, when people talk to you about computers, how do you figure out what they mean even when they are using a different set of jargon from what you've learned, or incorrect jargon, or plain don't themselves know what they mean? [more inside]
posted by d. z. wang on Nov 27, 2009 - 14 answers

green vs brown field - jargon decoder?

Businessjargon filter: 'green field' situation vs 'brown field' situation - what do these terms mean in a business context?
posted by jennyhead on Nov 6, 2009 - 9 answers

Better way to say "datacentre"?

Is there a more elegant, grammatical or pedantic way to say "datacentre"? Both words have Latin origins, but there seems to be something clumsy about that combination. Should it be a datumcentre? One word, two words or hyphenated?
posted by TheophileEscargot on May 28, 2009 - 28 answers

What are your examples of family jargon?

What are some examples of "family jargon"? For example, a friend's father once told a joke to his family that poked fun at the French. He concluded by saying, "Don't tell anyone from France." Now, within their family, "Don't tell anyone from France" means "Let's keep this between us"--and they say it even if the secret has nothing to do with the French. [more inside]
posted by Ms. Informed on Nov 7, 2008 - 112 answers

I'm looking for this Dadaist poster I saw awhile ago.

I'm looking for this Dadaist poster I saw awhile ago. [more inside]
posted by parkbench on Nov 7, 2008 - 2 answers

Why do disks drive?

Can you explain the drive in disk drive? [more inside]
posted by unmake on Jan 20, 2008 - 14 answers

Etymology of the term 'lunch out', ie 'freak out'?

Can anyone tell me the etymology of the term "lunch out," meaning 'to freak out'? [more inside]
posted by toomuchkatherine on Jan 9, 2008 - 8 answers

What's the jargon for a "convergent" word?

I'm looking for a term my professor used to use for "convergent words." What do you call a word that uses roots with similar meanings to form the same concept across two languages? (either by chance or direct-translation) [more inside]
posted by mecenday on Dec 10, 2007 - 10 answers

baby's arms, and apples - from where?

What's the source of "a baby's arm holding an apple"? [more inside]
posted by Rash on Oct 16, 2007 - 9 answers

What does "enterprise software" mean, anyway?

What is "enterprise software" and how is it different from any other kind of software ever? [more inside]
posted by DrSkrud on Nov 29, 2006 - 14 answers

List vs Laundry List

When does a "list" become a "laundry list"? [more inside]
posted by otherwordlyglow on Oct 25, 2006 - 17 answers

"Barnacle" code?

What does "barnacle code" mean to programmers? [more inside]
posted by pax digita on May 31, 2006 - 9 answers

Medical jargon help?

"tab-gen abortion" "a demonstration set of lams, pale green matchsticks made of compressed seaweed." These phrases occur in a novel I'm reading; the speaker is (presumably) a gynecologist or CNP who is counseling a patient about a second-trimester abortion. I Googled and searched various medical encylopedias and came up empty. What is "tab-gen"? And are lams some kind of abortifacient suppository? Thanks.
posted by scratch on Apr 21, 2006 - 8 answers

A speaker by any other name?

What's a nickname for the speakers on a stereo? [more inside]
posted by Gucky on Jan 12, 2006 - 21 answers

I know what wtf means, but wtf?

Is there anywhere a FAQ or tutorial to help newer people such as me with understanding short-hand terms such as "FARK", or what's the difference between "funny" and "teh funny"? [more inside]
posted by longsleeves on Oct 26, 2005 - 16 answers

Meaning [this is good]

What's the cool-kid, hackerish and full definition of the phrase: [this is good]? [more inside]
posted by teece on Jun 14, 2005 - 95 answers

What the heck is a "Grease-man"?

My friends and I were talking about building a cabin up North, and then we started talking like it was a 'heist' or a 'job', if you get the picture. So we designated someone as the Wheel-man, and someone else as the Grease-man, and then I asked: what's a grease-man? No one actually knew. I tried Google to no avail. Does anyone know what a Grease-man is? Are there any other *-man titles you can think up for a heist?
posted by indiebass on Apr 13, 2005 - 39 answers

Origin of the term meatspace?

Where did the term "meatspace" originate? I know it entered the OED in 2000 (alongside "gaydar," "cybersquatting" and "Frankenfood"), and I see The Word Spy credits a 1995 article about John Perry Barlow as the "earliest citation," but I think I saw it in cyberpunk sci-fi before that. Anyone got an earlier appearance than 1995? [more inside]
posted by mediareport on Mar 2, 2005 - 24 answers

"Symphony" vs. "Philharmonic" in the name of an orchestra: is there a difference?

"Symphony" vs. "Philharmonic" in the name of an orchestra: is there a difference?
posted by casarkos on Jul 7, 2004 - 10 answers

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