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13 posts tagged with etymology and word. (View popular tags)
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Where does the term "grill out" come from?

Why do people say "grill out" instead of "grill"? [more inside]
posted by ramenopres on Jul 1, 2013 - 26 answers

List of simple word roots

I am looking for a text file of a list of words (roughly the 5000-10000 most common English words) and their root word and root word language. My Google Fu only turns up single words or pages that I can type in a word to get to another page to get the etymology. Wikipedia has some stuff, but it is sorted by language root, which is not what I am looking for. I would like to have a long list of words in a text file so that I can manipulate it programatically. Comma separated or whatever, any format would be great. Here is one use case: Yoke - [list of words that have yoke in the etymological history] (Many, many many English words come from the root work for Yoke.) All answers appreciated!
posted by Monkey0nCrack on May 16, 2013 - 6 answers

Veet-suhl-zoot-ehn; high-falootin'.

What is this non-English, possibly German word? Sounds like veetsul zooten, means emotional from an impending change. [more inside]
posted by BusyBusyBusy on Jan 3, 2013 - 9 answers

Thesaurus word like "homage to"

Single word that means "to sing the praises of", poss. Greek or Roman in origin. Thinking paean, or ode but not quite. [more inside]
posted by jchinique on Feb 23, 2009 - 25 answers

A word for Greek voyeurism?

There is a Greek word which describes a preference for voyeurism over participation in sexual activities. What is it? (It may involve small boys.)
posted by Tufa on Feb 18, 2009 - 3 answers

Help me find a word for this obscure kind of situation!

Obsessivewordenthusiastfilter: I'm writing a paper and I'm trying to portray a certain situation which I feel would be best conveyed with the use of an allusion, preferably to a Greek or Roman myth. More inside! [more inside]
posted by Lockeownzj00 on Dec 9, 2007 - 19 answers

Does "biographize" exist? No, really.

Does the English language have a one-word verb meaning "to write a biography of someone"? And if so: does anyone use it? [more inside]
posted by mdonley on Sep 5, 2007 - 27 answers

Specialized Phrases in General Usage

Is there a name for phrases (or sometimes words) that have lost their previous specific/narrow/jargon meanings and are now used generally in a wide variety of situations with little or no knowledge about their prior usage? Are there lists of them anywhere with the phrases and explanations? [more inside]
posted by andoatnp on Jul 30, 2007 - 18 answers

Why is he called a "body man"?

The personal aide to a President, other politician, and certain other muckety-mucks is sometimes known as a "body man". (This usage was popularized, but not invented, by Charlie's role in The West Wing.) Why "body man"? Does anybody know the origin/etymology of the term?
posted by willbaude on Dec 24, 2005 - 13 answers

Where'd Borges Get Dem Werds?

On behalf of a friend, though it actually sounds like an interesting question and I think I'd like to know too: Could you put up something asking about whether there's a real-world source/derivation for the words "hron" and "hronir" used in Borges' "Tlon, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius"?
posted by Rev. Syung Myung Me on Nov 5, 2005 - 3 answers

Is there a word like widow or widower to describe a surviving twin?

Is there a word like widow or widower to describe a surviving twin? [more inside]
posted by Frank Grimes on Oct 22, 2005 - 12 answers

Where does "Cohee" come from?

What is the etymology behind the word "Cohee"? [more inside]
posted by Third on Sep 13, 2005 - 2 answers

And How!!!

What is the Etymological origin of the phrase "And How!" used as an exclamation. [more inside]
posted by Megafly on Mar 23, 2005 - 7 answers

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