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703 posts tagged with english.
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English language movies featuring France or French

Looking for movie recommendations that feature French scenes, spoken French is good too. [more inside]
posted by ellieBOA on Dec 2, 2013 - 25 answers

NAME THAT FILM PART N, Regency Fop edition

Some time ago, on one of the national basic cable movie channels (USA, I think) which would run multiple showings of a given film for a month or so, I repeatedly flipped into a period film that amused me each time I watched a snippet. Unfortunately, I never watched enough of the film to get a good idea of the plot, and therefore can't effectively describe the story, sooo... [more inside]
posted by mwhybark on Nov 29, 2013 - 23 answers

Is there an English version of these German publications

On the weekend I discovered a great series of German magazines/publications: Karfunkel, especially the Karfunkel Combat series. I know my son would love this stuff, but his German is super basic. So is there an English magazine series anything like these? [more inside]
posted by Megami on Nov 25, 2013 - 2 answers

Batman: Linguistic Origins

What are some examples of really easy/obvious etymological descents that most people aren't really aware of? I'm trying to prove to somebody that there are a lot of these in the english language but I've forgotten most of the interesting ones I used to know. [more inside]
posted by tehloki on Nov 22, 2013 - 27 answers

What percentage of English words have three syllables?

What percentage of English words have three syllables?
posted by reverend cuttle on Nov 12, 2013 - 10 answers

How do I teach English to students who don't speak a word?

Can you please help explain to me some techniques and procedures for teaching English to students with whom you don't share a common language? Its private tutoring and the students in this instance are two 10 year olds and they need to be speaking as much as they can in the next couple of months... and I will have them twice a week for an hour. I have an Ipad, a white board, and a copy machine....
posted by anonymous on Nov 1, 2013 - 14 answers

Is there any difference between the three sentences?

1)I should be going. 2) I shoud get going. 3)I should go. Please tell me the difference of the nuance between the three. Thank you.
posted by mizukko on Oct 23, 2013 - 25 answers

Help me get one of these ESL positions!

Right, calling all ESL teachers! Help this former teacher become a teacher again! I need your best 20 minute beginners English sample lesson plan and some resources I can use to brush up on my rusty grammar! [more inside]
posted by misspony on Oct 14, 2013 - 4 answers

How can I find English-language info on Japanese Pro Bowling/Bowlers?

I'm doing research on bowling and bowling pros, and I've had a hard time finding info on bowlers from Japan/JPBA (Japan Professional Bowling Association). Does anyone know any English sources that cover (or covered) the JPBA or any of their top bowlers? [more inside]
posted by lankford on Oct 10, 2013 - 2 answers

English speaking countries history

I want to get a firmer grasp of the English-speaking countries history. [more inside]
posted by nicolin on Oct 7, 2013 - 11 answers

Vegan. Why is it a hard 'gee' when vegetarian is a soft 'gee'?

I couldn't answer this when my Polish friend asked me why the letter changed sound, does anyone else know?
posted by dash_slot- on Aug 12, 2013 - 3 answers

Teaching positions around the U.S.?

Are there any websites that show reliable listings of middle/junior/senior high teaching positions throughout the U.S.? Public or private. Specifically in my case, positions in Secondary English/Language Arts.
posted by zardoz on Aug 10, 2013 - 9 answers

Need help with English names for a half Japanese baby girl.

We are trying to think of names for our impending baby girl. I am American and my husband is Japanese. We plan to give her an English first name, Japanese middle and last name. We have settled on a middle name, Miyuki (美幸). So her name thus far is _______ Miyuki xxxxshi. Criteria for English name: [1] must be easily writable in katakana (For example, Wi- isn't great, or Gl-, or x. All of these sounds can be written, but they come out complicated.) [2] must not sound silly in Japanese (this is subjective and related to [1].) [3] must not end in a long e sound, since middle and last names already do. [4] Prefer a classical name (i.e. something my Grandma would recognize as a name) but no need for it to be especially popular right now. We'll probably avoid the top five or ten most popular names. We are NOT looking for names that do double duty (which is what most of the threads I've found are about). So, not Naomi (always the first name that gets trotted out in these situations). We want a name from each culture that the grandparents on the opposite side can pronounce and that the kid can write when she gets to kindergarten. I'd especially appreciate input from fluent Japanese speakers here, and/or members of mixed families. Thanks!
posted by telepanda on Aug 8, 2013 - 51 answers

love pochin' #9

Is there such thing as an English-language, available in the US, version of "livres de poche" (pocket-sized books)? [more inside]
posted by threeants on Jul 23, 2013 - 13 answers

"historacle" just feels silly to me

Is there a term for a seer/diviner/oracle that is only able to see into the past? I'm willing to grab one from a non-English language if there is a word that means specifically "a seer who can only see the past", but English is prefered. Antiquated terms are OK. Bonus points for interesting etymological details (or links to interesting etymological details). [more inside]
posted by NoraReed on Jul 16, 2013 - 12 answers

Words in non-English languages that look English but really aren't?

I'm fascinated by the efforts of Deutsche Bahn to get rid of the "Bahnglisch" that litters the service with expressions that look English but aren't the sort of expressions that any native speaker of English would actually use, and it occurred to me that this sort of thing is common in German outside of DB, and probably all over the world. [more inside]
posted by ethnomethodologist on Jul 14, 2013 - 38 answers

Tips for learning english on vacation.

Hi. I'm a Portuguese student and I'm going to spend two weeks of my summer vacations on Leeds, England since I have an aunt there that invited me. I would like to spend my time practicing my English but I don't know what to do or where to go. Where can I meet new people (of my age range preferably: 20's), have a good conversation, listen to other people talk, ...? Your help will be much appreciated!
posted by tsuwal on Jul 3, 2013 - 6 answers

How to make people stop explaining simple English words to me?

I speak English with a foreign accent. Some people assume I don't speak Engish as well as them. And then speak to me like I'm a child. How can I tell them to stop? [more inside]
posted by mkdirusername on Jun 29, 2013 - 37 answers

How did we get from "tax haven" to "tax heaven" to "tax hell"?

Has anyone come across good sources on the history and evolution of the term "tax haven"? I am looking for sources detailing at least its first appearance in written or spoken English, and if possible the date in which it was (wrongly) translated into French as "tax heaven" (paradis fiscal). [more inside]
posted by ipsative on Jun 23, 2013 - 6 answers

Apostrophe Usage, Part 748...

In athletics, do events named "boys 100m" or "girls javelin" have an apostrophe? That is, should they rightly be "boys' 100m" and "girls' javelin"? It seems that the standard usage for grownup events is "men's" and "women's", but I'm unsure. Opinions?
posted by Jehan on Jun 11, 2013 - 9 answers

Americans do not have a British accent. Why?

I was at lunch today and asked my friends "Why don't American's have British accents in their speach?" They were dumbfounded and began to wonder themselves so I turn to Ask MetaFilter to find the answer.
posted by usermac on Jun 6, 2013 - 34 answers

Did Handel really say this?

After Georg Friedrich Händel became George Frideric Handel in 1727, I have it stuck in my mind that he once said, to a Brit who called him a German, "No, Sir, I am more English than you, because I chose to become English, whereas you were assigned your nationality willy-nilly," or words to that effect. But no amount of googling has found a reliable quote or reference to this. Has anyone else heard this story, or did my mind make it up? Anyone have a reliable source? [more inside]
posted by aqsakal on May 26, 2013 - 7 answers

Is my writing style overly complicated?

I learned English as a second language (native is Finnish). The emphasis in school was on vocabulary and very basic grammar; we did not to my recollection deal with stuff like passive voice etc. So in terms of writing in English, much of my "voice" has developed simply from what sounds right inside my head. However, I've been told that the way I write is overly complicated. Is this so? [more inside]
posted by Unhyper on May 22, 2013 - 48 answers

What single word describes these things that my employer sells?

I need one word, in singular form, that is synonymous with product, service, and experience (experience as in, taking a tour, sitting for a lecture, watching a live band..) The company I am working for provides many products, services and experiences for their customers, and I need a single, general noun that describes all of these. Help!
posted by Glendale on May 21, 2013 - 21 answers

List of simple word roots

I am looking for a text file of a list of words (roughly the 5000-10000 most common English words) and their root word and root word language. My Google Fu only turns up single words or pages that I can type in a word to get to another page to get the etymology. Wikipedia has some stuff, but it is sorted by language root, which is not what I am looking for. I would like to have a long list of words in a text file so that I can manipulate it programatically. Comma separated or whatever, any format would be great. Here is one use case: Yoke - [list of words that have yoke in the etymological history] (Many, many many English words come from the root work for Yoke.) All answers appreciated!
posted by Monkey0nCrack on May 16, 2013 - 6 answers

Is this an accent or am I hearing things?

These two YouTube videos, Video 1 and Video 2, contain men speaking English with a similar accent. Is this an accent? Can anyone identify it? [more inside]
posted by toftflin on May 15, 2013 - 15 answers

What to do in Montreal?

I'll be in Montreal and Longueuil, Quebec, Canada for two weeks. What budget-friendly things should I do there? [more inside]
posted by GlassHeart on May 12, 2013 - 17 answers

Can you help translate this Italian phrase?

Can you translate this Italian phrase into English? "Nun so' fesso ma faccio o' fesso perche' facendo o' fesso te faccio fesso." [more inside]
posted by ataxia on Apr 28, 2013 - 9 answers

House for sale

How to advertise a small French property in the classifieds ? [more inside]
posted by nicolin on Apr 21, 2013 - 2 answers

Finnish to English translation of Moomin theme song

I wonder if someone translates the Finnish theme song for Moomin into English. I cannot find the English translation in the internet. It would be very nice to understand what this interesting and classic Finnish song is about. [more inside]
posted by sanskrtam on Apr 18, 2013 - 3 answers

Why do letters have letter names? (B = "bee", H = "aitch"...)

I first came across this about 20 years ago in a Calvin & Hobbes strip where Hobbes taunts his friend: "Calvin and Susie, sitting in a tree. Kay-Eye-Ess-Ess-Eye-En-Gee!" I never understood why Hobbes was making "words" out of letters; I assumed it was something unique to comics (or tigers). Then today, a poem linked to in this FPP reminded me of that old comic strip and got me thinking: Why is there an entire parallel alphabet to spell out the letters of the alphabet? [more inside]
posted by andromache on Apr 14, 2013 - 29 answers

What should I do when I grow up aside from be taller?

For the last 12 years, I've worked as an adjunct English professor. It's time for a change. [more inside]
posted by miss-lapin on Apr 10, 2013 - 20 answers

So?

Where is this mystical land where it is acceptable to answer statements with: "So?" [more inside]
posted by 256 on Apr 5, 2013 - 40 answers

The visual equivalent of 'Prisencolinensinainciusol'

There are Latin fonts designed to mimic Cyrillic, Asian characters, and many other scripts. What are some examples of foreign-script fonts which mimic Latin characters?
posted by Gordafarin on Mar 30, 2013 - 4 answers

Standard American pronunciation training

Hello, I'm a French student preparing for English interviews and in my last mock session my interviewer talked about my accent that could put me at a disadvantage. I can't afford and don't have the time to see a speech therapist so I'm looking for books with audio tracks that are aimed at mastering the standard American accent. Do you know or know somebody that had had great results with a particular book? Thank you!
posted by lite on Mar 27, 2013 - 19 answers

Thesis argument about cultural contact zones

Hi Mefites! So I'm wondering if anyone can help me in finding something to argue in a 5-6 page paper regarding 'cultural contact zones' in Orwell's essay ' A Passage to India'. Specifically, "the concept of a “contact zone” emphasizes how subjects are constituted in and by their relations to each other, usually involving conditions of coercion, inequality, and conflict. It treats the relations among colonizers and colonized not in terms of separateness but in terms of interaction and interlocking understandings and practices, often within radically asymmetrical relations of power." ( this is part of the prompt). Any suggestions? I'm usually a fairly competent writer but am having trouble here. [more inside]
posted by marsbar77 on Mar 2, 2013 - 15 answers

VERY BRIEF 1940's German/English Translation Help Requested

Hello, Hive. I'm working on a historical graphic novel and a portion of it involves four sentences in German. I've made an effort to hammer something out by testing Google Translate's gibberish against some German language textbooks and grammar sites. I'm sorta confident about them, but would love for any bilingual native German speakers to give them a once over. Particularly, if you have any insights into generational differences in the German language, as this piece is supposed to take place during WWII. Posting them after the jump. [more inside]
posted by ProfLinusPauling on Feb 27, 2013 - 6 answers

Learning a neutral accent and DIY speech therapy

I teach for a living but have a lot of linguistic baggage that I'd like to get rid of. Specifically, I have some weird pronunciation/accent issues and would like to speak "General American" or newscaster English. Is this something I can do on my own? What resources should I use? [more inside]
posted by mecran01 on Feb 27, 2013 - 7 answers

"It work." or "It works". Which is correct?

Alright all your grammar masters. My wife is foreign and she announced "It work." when I rubbed her shoulder and fixed her pain. I corrected her by saying "It works." to teach her well. She then proceeded to explain to me the English of "plural" with adding an "s" to the verb. Is this correct?
posted by usermac on Feb 25, 2013 - 17 answers

Dayta or Datta?

Help me find a dialect map for the pronunciation of the word "data". [more inside]
posted by janell on Jan 29, 2013 - 30 answers

A Model AskMetafilter Post

When did people stop using the term "model minority"? [more inside]
posted by jason's_planet on Jan 27, 2013 - 27 answers

I'm looking for flowcharts depicting the oddities of English

In my lab I was hired in part so as to have a native speaker of English on hand to improve the general knowledge of the language if only by osmosis. So, deciding to take my duties seriously, the other day I drew the Oh Snap Flowchart on the whiteboard of our break-room where it was a big hit, what other amusing flowcharts are there floating around the internet that I could use to explain any of the various oddities of the English language? [more inside]
posted by Blasdelb on Jan 22, 2013 - 5 answers

Grammar nerd question

Which is correct? a) "Led Zeppelin is a band" b) "Led Zeppelin are a band" [more inside]
posted by deathpanels on Jan 9, 2013 - 30 answers

... all the trouble of a B.A. in English literature

I'm considering taking online courses/doing a part time degree in English for interest reasons. Will this be worth it? [more inside]
posted by Paper rabies on Jan 3, 2013 - 10 answers

What is it like working in Asia?

What is it like working in Asia? [more inside]
posted by inaisa on Dec 31, 2012 - 18 answers

A linguistic query

How long did it take for the United States to lose all traces of a British accent among its citizens? [more inside]
posted by newfers on Dec 29, 2012 - 18 answers

Would Chalky White really have sounded like that?

Does anyone have any resources to find historical forms of Ebonics? [more inside]
posted by patricking on Dec 15, 2012 - 11 answers

Baby Gael?

We are considering naming our soon-to-be-born son Gael. I have a few questions about that. [more inside]
posted by 2or3whiskeysodas on Dec 6, 2012 - 104 answers

High School Book Club Recommendations

I'm looking for specific book recommendations for high school exchange students. [more inside]
posted by trueluk on Dec 4, 2012 - 3 answers

As indicated below, the headline is a reference to same.

How do you edit writing written in a different dialect than your own? I'm very soon going to be responsible for editing some English technical/business writing by a team in a highly multilingual south-Asian country. [more inside]
posted by TheNewWazoo on Dec 2, 2012 - 10 answers

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