33 posts tagged with English and words.
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Numbers to Words

I want a plain text file listing the English words for number 1-100 (ideally, one per line any delimiter will be fine, I can fix that). One, Two, ..., One Hundred. It's got to be somewhere on this great internet. Can AskMe find it fast?
posted by Wolfdog on Dec 15, 2014 - 7 answers

Where can I find a good list of "feeling" adjectives?

In other words, I'm looking for a list of adjectives that could complete the sentence "I am feeling __." This is actually a fairly extensive group of adjectives, and I'm wondering whether this type of adjective is identified formally as a certain type of adjective (which would make it easier to find the set) or whether anyone has assembled such a list.
posted by arsgratia on Nov 12, 2014 - 7 answers

Who first "made it sing"?

What is the origin of "making it sing," as in to cause something to be at its best, be it an instrument, weapon, machine, or anything else? [more inside]
posted by BlackLeotardFront on Jan 27, 2014 - 14 answers

Batman: Linguistic Origins

What are some examples of really easy/obvious etymological descents that most people aren't really aware of? I'm trying to prove to somebody that there are a lot of these in the english language but I've forgotten most of the interesting ones I used to know. [more inside]
posted by tehloki on Nov 22, 2013 - 27 answers

"historacle" just feels silly to me

Is there a term for a seer/diviner/oracle that is only able to see into the past? I'm willing to grab one from a non-English language if there is a word that means specifically "a seer who can only see the past", but English is prefered. Antiquated terms are OK. Bonus points for interesting etymological details (or links to interesting etymological details). [more inside]
posted by NoraReed on Jul 16, 2013 - 12 answers

List of simple word roots

I am looking for a text file of a list of words (roughly the 5000-10000 most common English words) and their root word and root word language. My Google Fu only turns up single words or pages that I can type in a word to get to another page to get the etymology. Wikipedia has some stuff, but it is sorted by language root, which is not what I am looking for. I would like to have a long list of words in a text file so that I can manipulate it programatically. Comma separated or whatever, any format would be great. Here is one use case: Yoke - [list of words that have yoke in the etymological history] (Many, many many English words come from the root work for Yoke.) All answers appreciated!
posted by Monkey0nCrack on May 16, 2013 - 6 answers

Useful idioms

Business idioms that are actually useful? [more inside]
posted by AceRock on Jun 29, 2012 - 31 answers

Word sans-prefix is word no more?

What are some English words that contain a prefix, but the root is either not a word or is substantially unrelated to the prefixed word? [more inside]
posted by Geppp on Mar 23, 2012 - 36 answers

Know a good wordbook?

E.B. White and George Orwell both suggest that short, lively Saxon words are often better than long Latin ones. This rule has helped my own writing, but my thesaurus is still full of Greek and Latin. Is there a thesaurus that includes only Anglo-Saxon synonyms? Even better, is there one sortable by origin?
posted by ecmendenhall on Mar 3, 2012 - 2 answers

I ate my dinner in a diner...

What words become different words when you double a letter? [more inside]
posted by MsMolly on Feb 22, 2012 - 34 answers

What does the word "abstract" mean?

What does the word "abstract" mean? [more inside]
posted by internet_explorer on Jan 16, 2012 - 11 answers

Word Charts?

Is there a graphical representation of the number of english words, broken down by popular use? If not, is the raw data available online somewhere?
posted by parallax7d on Sep 27, 2011 - 12 answers

Saying sugar and yelling your full name: southern or not?

Two questions about vocabulary in the American South and elsewhere: did your parents call you sugar and did they, when you were in trouble, use both your first and middle names to summon you for the reckoning? [more inside]
posted by mygothlaundry on Jun 2, 2011 - 81 answers

Obscure words combine to form common phrase

There are certain obscure English words that are rarely used alone, but show up in more commonly used word pairs - the best example I can think of is "miasmic fug". I am trying to write about this phenomenon, so if anyone can suggest other word pairs like this I would be very grateful!
posted by csg77 on May 16, 2010 - 60 answers

Seeking English words with meanings hidden in plain sight

Help me find English words that have meanings hidden in plain sight. For example, it only recently occurred to me that a "quart" is a quarter of a gallon. [more inside]
posted by alms on May 4, 2010 - 142 answers

Pedestridance?

What is the word for the thing that happens when two people are walking toward each other from opposite sides of the lane and one goes left to let the other pass, but the second goes left too and then they both go right together and left again?
posted by Lucubrator on May 4, 2010 - 12 answers

serious business!

Is there a word for a person who has been subpoenaed? If two people are subpoenaed, they are called co-...? They're not co-defendants. Is there an equivalent?
posted by streetdreams on Nov 19, 2009 - 14 answers

Why is "win" often implicitly considered a conditional verb?

Grammarians: Is it OK to take liberties with the word "win" when publicizing a contest or draw? [more inside]
posted by wackybrit on Oct 5, 2009 - 15 answers

Female child/adult female

Why do we say "female child" or "male child," but reverse the word order for "adult female" and "adult male?"
posted by arcticwoman on Feb 15, 2009 - 19 answers

At only 100 words a year wouldn't English have dwindled to nothing by now?

Is the English language stagnating or do dictionaries just suck? [more inside]
posted by Ookseer on Dec 1, 2008 - 19 answers

f-f-freezing doesn't count

Tariff: Are there any other words in English that include two Fs next to each other?
posted by Pants! on Jul 29, 2008 - 62 answers

Is "stupider" a word?

Who's "stupider"? [more inside]
posted by macrowave on Mar 3, 2008 - 26 answers

What are the funniest-sounding English words to speakers of other languages?

What are the funniest-sounding English words to speakers of other languages? If you grew up speaking another language (for some weird reason) what English words still make you giggle?
posted by paul_smatatoes on Aug 23, 2007 - 45 answers

The rain in spain falls mainly on the plane

What is the shortest sentence that would highlight differences in dialects and accents in the English language? [more inside]
posted by Samuel Farrow on Jul 21, 2007 - 26 answers

Unisex words - why?

About unisex terms: What is the reasoning behind them? By this I mean, for example, flight attendant instead of steward or stewardess, server instead of waiter or waitress, etc. I suppose during the height of the feminist movement in the 70s it was probably claimed that it was sexist to use terms that specify gender. But I am scratching my head wondering what the logic would be behind this. After all, if you use a term to specify females (eg stewardess) then you are also specifying males (eg steward), so I fail to see how this would be sexist. Also, it strikes me as a very handy conversion to be able to specify gender in the same word as the title. Nowadays, we have two words.. so you might hear your neighbor say, "I went to see a female doctor yesterday" (indeed, I think this is a common one), so we are still specifying the sex, so why not use doctress? I'm just curious about why this trend towards unisex words is happening and the logic behind it because frankly, I fail to see any. Thanks for any thoughtful replies!
posted by dbooster on Feb 22, 2007 - 95 answers

What does one call something that contains the seeds of its own downfall?

What does one call something that contains the seeds of its own downfall? [more inside]
posted by viewofdelft on Oct 5, 2006 - 35 answers

Is there a term fo when people go by a single name?

Is there a term for when people go by a single name like Madonna or Cher? [more inside]
posted by Cochise on Jul 12, 2006 - 22 answers

Most common English words

What are the 500 most commonly used words in the English language ? Where can I get such a list ? [more inside]
posted by inquisitive on Apr 24, 2006 - 15 answers

"Inconceivable!"

What words do people use that consistently make you cringe and wonder if they understand what they are saying? [more inside]
posted by Invoke on Sep 11, 2005 - 241 answers

vocabulary building

I'm pretty verbose, but I don't think my vocabulary has grown much in years. And I'd like to build it up. [more inside]
posted by grumblebee on May 18, 2005 - 23 answers

"Normative"

What does "normative" mean? Is it a useful word? I only ever see it used in obscure, academic writing, which makes me suspect it's worthless. How is it different from "normal"? My dictionary says it means, "Of, relating to, or prescribing a norm or standard: normative grammar." That sounds like "normal" to me, so why not just say "normal"? Can someone give me some clear sentences that use the word -- sentences that are not written in post-modern, complit speak? Can one use "normative" meaningfully in a sentence about real-world things, like butter, eggs or bricks?
posted by grumblebee on May 21, 2004 - 24 answers

What's the difference between the words "proffer" and "offer"?

What's the difference between the words "proffer" and "offer"? This has been driving me mad for some reason for a few days now. Every dictionary I consult basically seems to say that they mean the same thing. But surely there must be a difference, right?
posted by reklaw on Apr 19, 2004 - 12 answers

Why do people misspell 'lose' as 'loose'?

Why do people misspell 'lose' as 'loose'? I was looking at this old entry at waxy. All the info on the web seems to be of the 'haha, look how stupid people are' variety but I haven't found anything that tries to explain these mistakes away. Is it phonetics, usage, words that are an exception to a rule?
posted by vacapinta on Dec 30, 2003 - 19 answers

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