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I need to copy a book.
March 24, 2006 1:25 PM   Subscribe

I have an out of print, foreign book (written by Jesuits, snatch) that I need copied. It's a language book, and written some time ago. The book is borrowed and I'd like a copy for reference. It does not have to be professional bound or anything like that -- and the original copy can be destroyed if necessary.

What kind of agency should I be seeking? Are there any big names out there I can ship the book to and they can ship me copies back? The content is what is important to me, I don't care if they stay within the same font or any kind of faithful reproduction. I would like this done for ~$100/copy, is it possible?

Will any place give me trouble for not having explicit permission to reproduce? It's a university printed text in Italy during the 70s, I would like to have a copy for a research project. I probably could get permission with a lot of work (I don't speak Italian, nor do I even want to imagine the red tape involved in getting written permission from an Italian university from a dead Jesuit's book). It is definitely out of print (I've already sent a few rudimentary e-mails), and has been so in a long time.

I would not like to sit in front of a xerox machine for hours and would like to have at least some kind of binding above stapling (like those paper back-like textbooks that professors have printed up, I'm sure there's a name for it).
posted by geoff. to Writing & Language (13 answers total)
 
If you don't mind destroying the book (which is kind of a shame) perhaps you could remove the binding, trim the pages with a paper cutter, and then run the pile through a sheet feeder?

As I type this, I'm envisioning nasty paper jams with fragile pages. Perhaps it isn't that good of an idea . . .

But binding shouldn't be a problem once you get it copied. Kinkos or a similar place can put it in a plastic spiral bound deal on the cheap.
posted by aladfar at 1:38 PM on March 24, 2006


ike those paper back-like textbooks that professors have printed up, I'm sure there's a name for it

Are you talking about Perfect binding?
posted by bshort at 1:48 PM on March 24, 2006


Oh, and I think "Book Conservation" is what you're looking for. I know some professional bookbinders in NYC that I could recommend, if you're interested.
posted by bshort at 1:49 PM on March 24, 2006


It doesn't take that long to copy a book with a photocopier. Seriously, I did it several times for my thesis as I was in a state where I did not have Uni library access as I wrote it. A ~250 page book takes maybe 15 minutes once you get into the swing of it, and then you can ask the nice people behind the counter to glue bind it like they do for course packets. It isn't pretty, but it gets you the info. Subsequent copies are even easier because you can use the feeder.

(As far as copyright trouble goes, I would go to a small independent copy place rather than to a Kinkos.)
posted by OmieWise at 1:50 PM on March 24, 2006


Well, you can try going to a copy shop and telling them your story, emphasizing how the book is out of print and fragile and you need to have a copy for reference. They can spiral bind or velobind for you. If one copy shop turns you down, you can try another. (A mom and pop shop might be a little more lax regarding copyright than Kinko's and you'll probably get better service anyway.)
posted by La Cieca at 1:51 PM on March 24, 2006


The book is borrowed and I'd like a copy for reference. It does not have to be professional bound or anything like that -- and the original copy can be destroyed if necessary.

You borrowed a book and you don't care if it is destroyed, as long as you get a decent copy out of the deal?

How about trying to find another copy (used)?
posted by pracowity at 2:10 PM on March 24, 2006


It doesn't take that long to copy a book with a photocopier.

I second this; I've done it many times.

Also: The book is borrowed... -- and the original copy can be destroyed if necessary.

WTF??
posted by languagehat at 2:33 PM on March 24, 2006


I should explain, the book isn't hand illustrated or leather bound -- it's a pretty cheap looking text. It's an Italian language book that's apparently very good but used only by the professor for his students -- all of this taking place in Italy. So if I can get it copied and put together nicer, the guy I'm borrowing it from doesn't care -- as long as he gets a copy. I was just assuming it'd be a whole lot easier to tear it apart and copy it than having to laborious scan each page, but I don't know.
posted by geoff. at 3:37 PM on March 24, 2006


I second (or is it third) just standing infront of a photocopier and doing this manually.

Most machines can be programmed to print double sided and / or even scan both pages at once and print out the two pages on one to one sheet back-to-back. (Doing this will mean you lose the pagination like 1 faces 2 will turn to 2 facing 3, but it can be done fairly quickly).

Grab some music with you and you will be done before you know it. (I've seen enough people doing it on university campuses).

Mom and Pop photocopy stores might even give you a discount on biding if you do all the photocopy on their self-serve machines too.

If you can do away with the book, I also agree with the suggestion that you go out and lop off the spine, and feed the book through a sheet feeder.
posted by phyrewerx at 4:12 PM on March 24, 2006


Thanks for explaining -- I figured there must be an innocent explanation, but until I heard it I wasn't lending you any of my books!
posted by languagehat at 6:22 AM on March 25, 2006



It doesn't take too long to copy the book yourself. But if you have more money than time you should be able to find a copy shop that will do it for you by hand.
posted by Tallguy at 11:20 AM on March 25, 2006


Just out of curiosity, what is the book? You might actually be able to find it at, say abebooks.com or alibris.com.

(And bshort, who are these skilled NY bookbinders you speak of? I have a few odd old volumes....)
posted by IndigoJones at 11:14 AM on March 26, 2006


IndigoJones - I know a couple of bookbinders who work with / at the Center for Book Arts. They're not cheap, but they're very very good. I'll send you an email about it.
posted by bshort at 7:05 AM on March 27, 2006


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