Painting assistance needed in the metafilter aisle
August 12, 2017 5:53 AM   Subscribe

Do I need primer for this situation? And would it be dumb not to paint the ceiling at the same time?

Relevant facts:
For a kitchen
Painting medium purple
Color is now beige
I think the coat is glossy but not sure
Last painted about 5 years ago
No spackling was done
Will be scrubbing down with Jasco no rinse JSP substitute cleanser and deglosser
Using Behr Marquee brand paint which has primer included and says one coat guarantee

So I thought this was a no-brainer for no primer, but I painted four darker purple 1' x 1' test squares on the wall when I thought I'd be going darker. I painted these without cleaning the wall.

I tried painting over one, but that patch is clearly darker, even though Marquee claims one coat needed only. I don't think it covered the beige completely, so maybe just a second coat would take care of it? Also I just did it with a brush and not the roller, so maybe it just wasn't thick enough? Or should I prime just those squares to be safe? Or would that also look weird, do I need to prime everything?

Also, would it be dumb not to paint the ceiling while I'm in the middle of doing everything? I'll be painting trim and window sills, but the ceiling doesn't look like it needs it. It's an apartment I only plan to be in a few more years.
posted by unannihilated to Home & Garden (8 answers total) 2 users marked this as a favorite
 
My experience with those 'one coat coverage' claims is that they only work if the old and new colors are very similar AND the paint is skillfully applied. With purple over beige -- not a chance.

The ceiling is up to you. If it looks fine and you can cut in the tops of the walls without getting purple on the ceiling that you'd need to touch up with ceiling paint that you don't have, then leave it.
posted by jon1270 at 6:20 AM on August 12


I meant to mention that primer probably isn't necessary but it might save a bit of money if you have the primer tinted to the color of the new paint. I've had a local big-box store tint primer at no extra charge, and primer is cheaper than paint.
posted by jon1270 at 6:24 AM on August 12 [2 favorites]


If you want a good, professional looking paint job, then just do a primer coat. No brainer there. You can take shortcuts and skip it, but it will look like you took shortcuts. Paint company product hype is not worth listening to.

You might as well paint the ceiling while you're in there. Fresh paint on the walls is going to make the ceiling look dingy. However, you can correct for your own variables of lighting, how often you really look at the ceiling, etc.

/trained in professional interior painting
posted by Miko at 8:33 AM on August 12 [1 favorite]


but the ceiling doesn't look like it needs it. It's an apartment I only plan to be in a few more years

I wouldn't even consider painting the ceiling. However, a coat of primer is worth the effort.
posted by she's not there at 10:49 AM on August 12


One coat paint by any brand is a total lie. Unless it's white-on-white. For a darker color like purple you will likely need a tinted primer for a good outcome. Tell them at the paint store your color choice and they will give you a purple or medium gray tinted primer so that you don't have to paint 3+ coats of paint. I would also use this opportunity to paint the ceiling as it will make a big difference and you are already doing all the prep work etc.
/hardcore paint fan who can practically recite the BM fan deck.
posted by saradarlin at 12:12 PM on August 12 [1 favorite]


that patch is clearly darker, even though Marquee claims one coat needed only

It sounds like your test patches looked fine with one coat. So, only one coat is needed.

However, paint looks different depending on what's under it.

I don't think it covered the beige completely, so maybe just a second coat would take care of it

You should be able to tell if the beige has been completely covered by a purple paint. It seems like you aren't sure, so you probably need two coats.

Colored primer can be helpful.
posted by yohko at 12:54 PM on August 12


I am absolutely no expert in painting, but whenever I've done it and thought "Hmm it doesn't look as good as I hoped/quite right", doing another coat has generally been the solution. The time before last, I didn't paint the ceiling and given that the walls were being swapped to a different shade of white, it could have looked dingy - it was fine.
posted by AnnaRat at 2:34 PM on August 12


Interesting. I talked to the paint guy at Home Depot who said that the issue is that the paint I'm painting over is likely semi-gloss, so it's not sticking properly. He had never heard of the deglosser cleanser I mentioned. He recommended either sanding or a primer, and if I used the latter I wouldn't need the expensive, high-quality paint I was buying. When I asked about tinting the primer he said I wouldn't need it, though I've read elsewhere that this is sometimes done. (Not sure if this was a difference of opinion or it was because of this one-time stuff I was buying.) I think I'm going to try the sanding first. Consumer Reports rated the paint very high, so I think it's worth trying before I move to doing two coats.
posted by unannihilated at 2:54 PM on August 12


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