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What are media licences?
June 15, 2013 6:44 AM   Subscribe

I am paying someone to write and distribute a press release. They want money upfront so they can pay for 'media licences'. What are media licences?

I hired someone through an online freelancer site -- they had buckets of good feedback -- but having hired them, I now have some reservations. (I wasn't impressed with their copy and they got my name wrong when they emailed me.)

What are media licences and are they necessary?
posted by popcassady to Media & Arts (6 answers total)
 
One form of media license is stock images from places like Getty. And yes, if you want to use that picture, the license is necessary.
posted by Chocolate Pickle at 6:48 AM on June 15, 2013


Not being snarky here, but did you ask them? what did they say when you asked them?
posted by Unified Theory at 7:04 AM on June 15, 2013 [1 favorite]


You pay to licenses for music, images, quoting from a book or poem--or is this person figuring to buy ad space for you? if they're just writing and emailing a press release, figure 1/2 up front and the remainder upon completion.
posted by Ideefixe at 8:33 AM on June 15, 2013


OP is in the UK. I imagine it's something like this. Ask them for clarification though. More info here.
posted by Marie Mon Dieu at 8:39 AM on June 15, 2013


If you are distributing an original press release I don't understand why NLA licences - which cover the reproduction and distribution of content from their members - are relevant to your situation.

Unless: they plan to send you cuttings and links when the story gets picked up. Since the Meltwater case last year, the rule is - legally speaking - commercial organisations distributing links to NLA member content need licences.

But I'd be very clear what you're paying for and why. You may be happy tracking coverage yourself. If you are paying NLA fees you should be only paying or what you need.
posted by MuffinMan at 9:15 AM on June 15, 2013 [1 favorite]


I'm in the states, so not sure if there are unique laws or requirements in the UK, but I have never heard of such a thing.

I'm familiar with the Meltwater case, but that really shouldn't have anything to do with distributing a release unless you intend to have copyrighted content in the release.
posted by forkisbetter at 8:23 AM on June 17, 2013


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