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What can I do with all these luscious limes?
April 18, 2013 4:31 PM   Subscribe

i have a small tree in the backyard, which is covered in big juicy limes. What can I do with them?

I have used fresh-squeezed juice in fish and chicken recipes. I've donated some to my neighbour who drinks vodka, lime and soda water. I'm not a big cocktail drinker, but I just may make genuine margaritas with the juice at some stage.

What else can I use them for? I love the scent, particularly in my house when I use the oil in an oil-burner, but cold-pressing to extract the oil seems like a lot of hard work for little payoff. Can I put a few pieces of peel in a pan of water and let it simmer for a while? Will that make my house smell lime-ish?

Recipes also welcome, but gluten and I don't get along, dammit. Maybe a cheesecake with a gluten-free base? Are there lime-flavoured lollies/sweets/candies I could make at home?

Any other uses I'm overlooking?

(I've just realised I can probably freeze the juice as ice-cubes for recipes.)
posted by malibustacey9999 to Home & Garden (45 answers total) 28 users marked this as a favorite
 
#1 you should make lime curd. there are lots of recipes out there. no gluten, just a ton of egg yolks. then you should make a pavlova with the whites and put the lime curd on top.

#2 make a non-alcoholic drink with lots of lime juice, pinch salt, soda water, and simple syrup to taste. I drank so much of this in India I felt like I was taking the enamel off my teeth, but it is addictive
posted by genmonster at 4:34 PM on April 18, 2013 [3 favorites]


Can I put a few pieces of peel in a pan of water and let it simmer for a while? Will that make my house smell lime-ish?

Oh yes, it will - I did it with juiced lemons off my tree last year, and it made my house smell AWESOME.
posted by deadmessenger at 4:37 PM on April 18, 2013


LIMEADE.

3 limes to a pitcher. Squeeze 'em, stir in some sugar and maybe a sprig of mint, fill the pitcher the rest of the way with water.

Add some Pimms and cucumber if feeling naughty.

While we're on the subject of cucumbers: Cucumber-lime-mint agua fresca (this makes a really good absinthe cocktail if you're inclined.)
posted by Pallas Athena at 4:37 PM on April 18, 2013 [5 favorites]


Make refreshing limeade!

Cut wedges and put them in glasses of Coke (with or without rum)!

Make mojitos (if you ever get into a cocktail mood)!

Have friends over for Coronas (best served with a wedge of lime)!

. . . You could also do tequila shots with them, I guess?

Wow, I sound like a heavier drinker now than I usually think of myself as being. But seriously, limes rule, for drinks and otherwise. I love limes.
posted by honey wheat at 4:38 PM on April 18, 2013


Yes, putting lime peel in water and simmering it will release lime scent really well, but not to the extent that the oil burner does. I've done this with lime peels and basil, and I love how it smells.

Lime and cucumber slices in a pitcher of water kept in the fridge is very refreshing.

Some good lime recipes:
Lime curd
Candied Limes
Cilantro Lime Dressing
posted by erst at 4:38 PM on April 18, 2013


lime marmalade

key lime pie (w/ gluten-free crust)

You could also juice them & then freeze in ice cube trays for use later
posted by belladonna at 4:39 PM on April 18, 2013


Key lime pie with an almond-flour-and-coconut crust. I make a crust from the recipe in this GF cookbook, and the lime custard from this book. To give the lime custard an added zing, I zest a lime or two into the custard before pouring it into the crust. The crust tastes like a Mounds chocolate bar, and it can be served to vegetarians with Celiacs. Seriously, this pie will change your life. You'll make friends with celebrities. I swear I'm not making this up.
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 4:40 PM on April 18, 2013 [8 favorites]


If you make limeade, zest a couple limes that you'll cut up anyway, and add the zest to the simple syrup-lime juice mix. Heavenly!
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 4:42 PM on April 18, 2013 [2 favorites]


If you like that lime oil scent, you can make your limeade more pungent by putting the lime halves in a blender with the limeade after you juice them. Blending just for a bit will release some of the lime oil into the limeade and make it more intense.
posted by pombe at 4:42 PM on April 18, 2013


Oh, and Blazecock Pileon just reminded me that one of my favorite deserts is sliced pineapple drizzled with molasses, lime zest, and lime juice.
posted by pombe at 4:43 PM on April 18, 2013


I love limeade. It's so delicious and refreshing!
posted by Ruthless Bunny at 4:47 PM on April 18, 2013


If you get the GF cookbook I linked to, multiply the ingredient quantities by 1.5x. She's a bit stingy with the proportions, to my mind.
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 4:47 PM on April 18, 2013 [1 favorite]


In my experience, nine average-sized limes will get you roughly one cup of juice.
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 4:49 PM on April 18, 2013


Nthing limeade, with the added suggestion that you should make at least one batch and then use frozen cherries as ice cubes HOLY SMOKES IT'S SO GOOD.
posted by saladin at 4:49 PM on April 18, 2013


Key lime pie ice cream!
posted by thirdletter at 4:52 PM on April 18, 2013 [1 favorite]


In addition to the juice you can also freeze the zest for later!
posted by brilliantine at 4:53 PM on April 18, 2013 [1 favorite]




Do you like seafood? Make ceviche! (That's just a quick-googled recipe that seems to get the proportions about right, not one that I've tried or especially recommend.)
posted by contraption at 4:54 PM on April 18, 2013 [1 favorite]


I just noticed you're from Australia (rather than Malibu as your name suggests) so you might not be as familiar with the dish as I assumed. Ceviche is a cold preparation of mostly seafood and lime juice, wherein the seafood is "cooked" by the acidity in the lime juice (and it really does taste cooked despite the fact that no heat is ever applied.) It's delicious, and you can throw in just about any kind of shellfish or white-fleshed ocean fish. Make sure you don't skip the cilantro, it's integral.

Now I'm curious about the status of Mexican cuisine in Australia. Is it well-known? The Australians I've run into in Mexico seemed to enjoy it, but I don't know if that means you can get a decent taco in Sydney.
posted by contraption at 5:09 PM on April 18, 2013


Pickle some!
posted by brina at 5:18 PM on April 18, 2013 [2 favorites]


Caipirinha is a great way to use up a bunch of limes, provided you can get cacha├ža -- the recipe I use takes one small lime per drink.
posted by irrelephant at 5:20 PM on April 18, 2013


Unless these are Key limes, do not make Key lime pie. You will be very sad.
posted by Specklet at 5:24 PM on April 18, 2013 [1 favorite]


Put them in the coconut.
posted by shew at 5:30 PM on April 18, 2013


Cook's Illustrated did a taste test of Persian (regular) and Key limes for pie and found no difference. Do it. Blazecock's recipe above sounds amazeballs.
posted by fingersandtoes at 5:31 PM on April 18, 2013 [1 favorite]


Here's a delicious limeade recipe...spicy!
An excess of juicy limes is an enviable problem.
posted by maryrussell at 5:53 PM on April 18, 2013


Raspberry lime rickeys! Juice of one lime, plus 2-3 tbs sugar and a handful of frozen raspberries. Put in a blender with seltzer and blend. Dilute with additional seltzer to desired consistency.
posted by pie ninja at 5:54 PM on April 18, 2013 [1 favorite]


Preserved Limes!
Lime Posset
If you grow basil, it goes so well with lime. Basil and lime sorbet...
posted by theuninvitedguest at 5:56 PM on April 18, 2013 [2 favorites]


Gin and lime juice is a delicious tropical concoction you may want to try...
posted by motown missile at 6:11 PM on April 18, 2013


I was shocked when I saw her mix a whole lime, several cups of water and sugar in the blender. I was sure that it was going to a disaster, the strong taste of of the skin and the bitterness of pith were going to ruin it. She blended and strained the limonada, as soon as I tasted it (expecting I would have to politely pretend I liked it), I was amazed at how good and refreshing it was. The lime or lemon skins actually enhanced it, there was a slight bitter taste, but it was very subtle and actually made the limeade or lemonade better. instructions

And yes you can make candy! Semi-easy. You need the right kind of thermometer, but not much else by way of special supplies. Here is a recipe for lemon gum drops that looks like what I did last time I made them. I haven't made lime yet but based on experience with lemon, my suggestions would be to make use of the zest and to maybe even get a commercial lime flavouring and/or citric acid to escalate the lime taste a bit.

Another way to freeze the juice is to bung it all into a large zip-lock freezer bag and freeze it laying flat (maybe on a frozen pizza box...). The juice doesn't freeze quite as solid as ice and you can smash it once it's frozen, and you'll have a bag of frozen juice you can easily grab a full cup or tiny tsp out of.
posted by kmennie at 6:13 PM on April 18, 2013 [3 favorites]


Recreate this photograph
posted by dobi at 6:30 PM on April 18, 2013 [1 favorite]


Indian lime pickle (there are many variants).
posted by ottereroticist at 6:52 PM on April 18, 2013 [1 favorite]


If you have leftover peels (after juicing or cooking or whatever), you can use the peels to make citrus vinegar for cleaning. I like using white vinegar to clean with but I hate the vinegar smell. If you put citrus peels in a bottle of white vinegar and leave it for a few weeks (or more) it really cuts the vinegar smell. Mix 1 parts vinegar to 4 parts water in a spray bottle for cleaning. Also you can pour it down drains with baking soda to clean them and get that awesome volcano :)
posted by radioamy at 7:23 PM on April 18, 2013


Oh, and make key lime pies.
posted by radioamy at 7:23 PM on April 18, 2013


Ceviche! Limes are so bloody expensive in Australia that I haven't made it in years, but it would be my go-to dish if I had a productive lime tree.
posted by third word on a random page at 7:56 PM on April 18, 2013


In addition to chicken and fish, you can make:
Salsa (tomato, mango, use your imagination)
Guacamole
marinades (especially flank steak for fajita, sense a Mexican theme?)
garnish for Thai and Vietnamese dishes
posted by crazycanuck at 8:23 PM on April 18, 2013


Get mango. Cut up mango. Squeeze lime juice over mango slices. Toss a little salt over the top. Eat. Get another mango....
posted by amanda at 8:23 PM on April 18, 2013 [1 favorite]


Try the Moscow Mule, a simple drink that will change your life.
posted by Napoleonic Terrier at 8:38 PM on April 18, 2013 [1 favorite]


Also, juice bunch and freeze the juice in ice cube trays for future use. Once they are frozen you can pop them out and store them in a plastic bag to save space in the freezer.
posted by Youremyworld at 9:13 PM on April 18, 2013 [1 favorite]


Sopa de Lima
posted by girlmightlive at 6:23 AM on April 19, 2013


Just here to point out the absolutely amazing zest! Vast majority of commercial citrus in the US comes with a yucky coating to help them keep longer. It works, but it's not meant to be eaten, meaning it's bad for you. You have pure lovely unadulterated zest. And I am jealous.
posted by Neekee at 6:58 AM on April 19, 2013


You can use them in a power outage.
posted by tenaciousmoon at 12:04 PM on April 19, 2013


I wondered if lime gremolata was a thing, and it is! Here's a great-sounding recipe for Sea Scallops with Cilantro Gremolata and Ginger Lime Beurre Blanc. (The gremolata itself is simply 1.5 T chopped cilantro, 1 chopped clove of garlic, and the zest of one lime.)
posted by Room 641-A at 12:27 PM on April 19, 2013


And lime cordial (the recipe uses 18 limes)
posted by kmennie at 2:19 PM on April 19, 2013


Gin and tonics, all round!
posted by mskyle at 4:41 PM on April 19, 2013


Neekee: "Vast majority of commercial citrus in the US comes with a yucky coating to help them keep longer. It works, but it's not meant to be eaten, meaning it's bad for you."

It's not harmful (or it wouldn't be permitted for use), but it's unappealing. (Reportedly, if you flame a waxed citrus rind over a cocktail it may leave a tiny bit of soot on top of the drink. Ugh.)

This thread on eGullet has discussion of how to remove it, if desired. (TL;DR version from the thread: "The answer is: surfactant", either produce wash or diluted dish detergent, plus gentle manual agitation.)
posted by Lexica at 9:02 AM on April 20, 2013


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