What should I keep in mind when applying for an internal role change?
January 28, 2013 10:02 AM   Subscribe

A new role has been created within my department for which I would like to be considered. What should I keep in mind when preparing my application for this internal role, given my familiarity with the company and with the hiring managers?

Key info:

- I have taken every opportunity in performance reviews and casual conversations with superiors to express my interest in this type of role in the past, prior to its creation. This has been met favorably by my superiors (which includes the hiring manager for this role).

- My current role is vital to the ongoing operations of the company -- we do not currently have a contigency plan should I happen to find myself smooshed by a bus tomorrow (although I have advocated for one). I don't want this to hinder my chances.

- I have worked very closely in a semi-hierarchical system with the hiring managers for this job, all of whom are intimately familiar with my work over the last several years.

- The position as described (and the qualifications sought) are slightly on the aspirational side for me, but I think I have other experience and traits that more than make up for the lack of a few letters after my name (e.g., significant institutional knowledge and relationships). Normally in this situation, I would be very careful about the language I use in a resume and cover letter. But, erm, "decorative" wording is unlikely to be helpful in this situation though, given my familiarity with the hiring managers.

So given all that, what tips might the 'filter be able to offer?
posted by undercoverhuwaaah to Work & Money (3 answers total)
 
Have you spoken to your current manager about this position specifically and your intent to apply? The last thing you want is for your current manager to find out that you applied for another job in the company from someone else.
posted by magnetsphere at 10:15 AM on January 28, 2013


The position as described (and the qualifications sought) are slightly on the aspirational side for me, but I think I have other experience and traits that more than make up for the lack of a few letters after my name (e.g., significant institutional knowledge and relationships).

Psst. Yeah, you. C'mere. You wearin' a wire? Nah? Okay.
Okay, don't tell anybody I told you this: Every position description is aspirational. That weeds out the people who are really unqualified.

Don't worry about whether you're perfectly qualified for the job. Explain in your cover letter why you're awesome for this job, not why the job doesn't really require these certifications (you'd be surprised how often hiring managers see that, and it is an instant trash-canning).

And then, let it happen. Apply for the job, and don't bug anyone about it. If you don't get it, it's not personal and you don't have to quit in shame. It's just business.
posted by Etrigan at 10:17 AM on January 28, 2013 [1 favorite]


You might find my previous question helpful, particularly my updates.

The short version: you need to show the people involved that you can offer them something that they perhaps haven't seen from you before (in addition to demonstrating thorough familiarity with the company and what it does).

But most importantly, you need to treat this like you are any other candidate for the job, not an internal hire.

The catch is that while you do that, you need to demonstrate all of the awesome internal knowledge that you DO have in a way that says, "It'll be way more useful for you to hire me than some external candidate."
posted by Madamina at 11:20 AM on January 28, 2013


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