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Optimal prime rib temperature scheme
December 24, 2012 5:21 PM   Subscribe

Christmas Eve rib roast question #2. Hot sear? Steady 350 degrees? Somewhere in between?

I've read numerous recipes for standing rib roast, AKA prime rib. The most extreme recipe calls for 5 minutes per pound at 500 F, then turn off the oven and let it sit for 2 hours. Others recommend a steady 350 the whole time. In between are countless combinations of searing and roasting temperatures. What's really the best way? Anyone tried both ways?
posted by scose to Food & Drink (12 answers total) 6 users marked this as a favorite
 
We have done hot sear many times and always had great success.
posted by bq at 5:24 PM on December 24, 2012


I had really excellent results by searing it at high temperature for like 15 minutes. dropping the heat to about 350, and then cooking to an internal temperature of 125. Remove immediately and let sit for 30 minutes. Serve immediately. The "remove immediately" part is important; every minute it stays in the oven at that point shifts the roast farther along the rare - medium spectrum.
posted by Justinian at 5:25 PM on December 24, 2012 [1 favorite]


Oh, use a meat thermometer to gauge when it is done, don't just cook it for a set time per pound. Put the thermometer into the thickest part of the meat.
posted by Justinian at 5:26 PM on December 24, 2012 [2 favorites]


I prefer the slow and low method (200 degrees for 4 hours, sitting tented in foil for about 30-45 minutes), then blasting it at 450 for about 7 or 8 minutes.

Good idea here.
posted by kuanes at 5:30 PM on December 24, 2012 [2 favorites]


For matters like this, I often trust the food lab: http://www.seriouseats.com/2009/12/the-food-lab-how-to-cook-roast-a-perfect-prime-rib.html
posted by weaponsgradecarp at 5:30 PM on December 24, 2012 [2 favorites]


Agreed. The Food Lab is who I would turn to. Short version: very low temperature followed by searing at the end.
posted by O9scar at 5:35 PM on December 24, 2012 [3 favorites]


In lieu of favoriting I want to second the food lab recipe. The long slow heat finishes it and makes sure the outside will be nice and dry. Because of the low temp, there's no carry-over guesswork, and it's done the same all throughout. Then, the hot sear gives an amazing, all-over crust. I have done this 4 times now and it's, as designed, foolproof.
posted by ftm at 5:36 PM on December 24, 2012 [1 favorite]


Thanks for the answers, everyone. Looks like a mandate for the Food Lab recipe. Best answers are contingent on my results tomorrow :)
posted by scose at 6:07 PM on December 24, 2012 [1 favorite]


I think you can't go wrong with that Food Lab method.
posted by unSane at 7:14 PM on December 24, 2012 [1 favorite]


Too late to help you, but maybe others... Barbara Kafka has a wonderful cookbook called Roasting where she advocates a high sear first, a low middle, and a higher end temp. It comes out great every time. This blog has the recipe.
posted by cecic at 7:29 PM on December 24, 2012


The most extreme recipe calls for 5 minutes per pound at 500 F, then turn off the oven and let it sit for 2 hours.

As a data point, I tried this tonight and clearly it depends on the thermal inertia of your particular oven because mine turned out very undercooked. Significantly. It screwed up the joint trying to save it and we had decided (before this thread) that a slow cook followed by a sear would have been better. So that may be of help.
posted by Brockles at 7:47 PM on December 24, 2012


I have made several prime ribs following the Food Lab method and had phenomenal success each time.
posted by Silvertree at 8:01 PM on December 24, 2012


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