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How to get my door to automatically shut quietly when I close it.
November 18, 2012 9:01 PM   Subscribe

My door shuts somewhat loudly when I close it and it annoys my roommate. Solutions? (Other than remembering to shut it slowly, which hasn't worked). Ideally I could get some door-stopping device from Amazon, but I'm open to other suggestions.

I'm looking for solutions other than remembering to shut it slowly, which hasn't worked. Ideally I could get some door-stopping device from Amazon, but I'm open to other suggestions.
posted by jtothes to Home & Garden (18 answers total) 1 user marked this as a favorite
 
Try and muffle the door - you need to soften the surfaces that make contact when the door closes. You could put some self adhesive felt dots at regular intervals around the doorframe, or use moldable rubber like Sugru.
posted by His thoughts were red thoughts at 9:11 PM on November 18, 2012 [5 favorites]


Could you prop a book or shoe or something in front of the frame so that the door will hit that when you try to close it normally, and then just shut it the rest of the way?
posted by kagredon at 9:11 PM on November 18, 2012 [1 favorite]


I was given an office that had a door with weatherstripping on the bottom of it, and it definitely dragged such that I was forced to shut it slowly but did not ever actually impede shutting the door. (Also, it kept out insects!)

If there's leeway, you could try putting up very thin soft pads on the interior panel that meets the door such that the door can't actually physically bang into the panel without hitting the pads first.
posted by vegartanipla at 9:12 PM on November 18, 2012 [2 favorites]


Any hardware store this time of year will have long self-adhesive felt or rubber strips, used for weatherstripping, but also for this purpose. It will make a difference in the sharpness of the contact sound, at least, which is part of why it's annoying.
posted by dhartung at 9:15 PM on November 18, 2012 [4 favorites]


Use plain ordinary masking tape to soften the frame. We used this trick to muffle noisy doors in student housing with great success.

Examine the door from the "outside" (ie, the side it closes towards), close the door and carefully note where the door touches the frame first. It's probably a few six to eight inch stretches near one of the corners. Apply a few layers of masking tape to the frame in those areas, at least four layers to start with, building up a small pad.

Then have someone else bang the door closed while you watch from the other side. The taped areas will be quieter, but other spots on the frame might be banging loud; tape those. Once you've identified all of the "loud spots", then just keep adding more layers until you're satisfied with the quietness. Sometimes it takes 12 or 16 layers if the door is really warped. Fortunately, masking tape is fairly cheap.
posted by ceribus peribus at 9:31 PM on November 18, 2012 [3 favorites]


You want something like a hydraulic door-closer. It will push back on the door when you would otherwise be slamming it, pulling it in quietly the rest of the way. Most hardware stores should be able to provide you with a starting point, but if you want to get more heavy duty you might have to go to the internet.
posted by rhizome at 9:32 PM on November 18, 2012


I actually just weatherstripped the hallway door in the condo I am renting. My across the hall neighbours have a dog and frequently come and go and are named Mr. and Mrs. Slammy (in my head). I put the adhesive tape weather stripping in my door but had to cut it in half - otherwise the door wouldn't close enough for the bolts to catch. Interior doors tend to fit even tighter so you might be better off just getting little round felt stickers that work as bumpers.

A bottom door seal that drags a bit could help too.

However, the problem might be more like mine where other people slamming their doors causes mine to rattle. So you might want to put weather stripping or bumpers on your roommates door as well. A bottom seal will also keep more noise out.
posted by srboisvert at 9:45 PM on November 18, 2012


Use plain ordinary masking tape to soften the frame. We used this trick to muffle noisy doors in student housing with great success.

This is a fantastic idea! A couple of layers would do the trick, I think.
posted by His thoughts were red thoughts at 9:55 PM on November 18, 2012


Question - source of the sound that travels:

1) the door slab slams against the door frame
2) the doorkbob/lock/handle retracts and snaps closed when the door is closed
3) combination of both

Most straightforward is to get rid of the doorknob or replace it with a different kind of door-staying-closed device.

My neighbours don't understand the idea of twisting the handle, manipulate the door, release the handle to avoid the ck*CHUNK*-ckchunk, flushing water, repeat kchunkthing.
posted by porpoise at 10:22 PM on November 18, 2012 [1 favorite]


Door muff?
posted by ninazer0 at 11:10 PM on November 18, 2012


My door used to rattle in the frame when the windows were open in the house (air pressure changes). I would stick a sock in between the door and the frame just above the handle and close the door on it. This made the door tight in the frame, and the door was pretty quiet when I closed it too. Perhaps you could just cut a sock or piece of fabric and adhere it to the frame.
posted by christiehawk at 12:35 AM on November 19, 2012


"The trick is to release the door handle only once. Most people open a door, let go of the handle again and shut the door. But after I have opened the door, I keep the handle turned until I have passed through the doorway. Then, without releasing the catch, I take hold of the handle in my other hand. I hold it in the same position until I have gently closed the door and the catch is ready to click into place."

The Butler's Guide to Clothes Care, Managing the Table, Running the Home and Other Graces by Stanley Ager and Fiona St. Aubyn
posted by plokent at 4:08 AM on November 19, 2012 [3 favorites]


Is there enough room to hang a towel over the top of the door? Cheap, easy and will do the trick.
posted by cestmoi15 at 5:27 AM on November 19, 2012


Is there enough room to hang a towel over the top of the door?

If you do this, you might need to try a thin kitchen towel rather than a terrycloth towel.
posted by CathyG at 7:40 AM on November 19, 2012


Try and muffle the door - you need to soften the surfaces that make contact when the door closes. You could put some self adhesive felt dots at regular intervals around the doorframe...

Just wanted to pipe in to say that I was once upon a time the annoyed roommate and we did this to my slammy roommate's door and it worked like a charm.
posted by urbanlenny at 7:42 AM on November 19, 2012


When I lived in a barracks with really loud automatically shutting interior doors, we bought that sticky-tack stuff - that clay-like gunk you can use to hang posters without making holes? we'd put dots of it in the frame where the door hit until the door didn't bang when it closed.
posted by lemniskate at 8:42 AM on November 19, 2012


Strong cloth bean bag with string through it looped round the handles. Bean bag cushions the door slam.
posted by urbanwhaleshark at 2:06 PM on November 19, 2012


I'd vote for the self adhesive felt dotes on the door stop; easy, fast and effective. Put one of them on the top and one on the botton of the verticle door stop, on the door knob side, just like you'd see on a kitchen cabinet. If you put it on the hinge side the door will bind.
posted by PaulBGoode at 12:36 AM on November 20, 2012


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