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Tricks with chix
September 27, 2012 11:17 AM   Subscribe

An enormous chicken with immense, disproportional legs?

Anybody remember a drawing like that? The point was that a gigantic change in scale would require different proportions for supporting limbs.
posted by LonnieK to Science & Nature (6 answers total) 1 user marked this as a favorite
 
Can you provide any more details? Where did you see it? Context?
posted by jeffamaphone at 12:05 PM on September 27, 2012


Well, you're talking about allometric scaling, but I don't know of any images of chickens...
posted by Specklet at 12:26 PM on September 27, 2012


Sadly, no memory of context. (The human brain seems to scale in the opposite direction with age.) It was a cartoonish drawing from the POV of someone looking up at the beast. Not silly, but a cartoon nonetheless. What grabbed you immediately was how exponentially big the legs were. And it was accompanied by a short lesson in physics.
I don't recall the term allometric scaling, but I looked at the link, and that's exactly what it was meant to illustrate.
posted by LonnieK at 12:31 PM on September 27, 2012


Hmm, no luck. My allometric physics chicken is now the most awesome thing in my Google image search history.
posted by jeffamaphone at 1:22 PM on September 27, 2012 [2 favorites]


For context, I seem to recall that factory farm chickens bred for eating have gigantic breasts and legs because those are the most popular parts. Perhaps the drawing accompanied an article or opinion piece on factory farms?
posted by booksherpa at 6:38 PM on September 27, 2012


@booksherpa .. thanks .. and maybe.
But the distinct point of the drawing and its caption, as I remember, was to illustrate the point that you can't just set the copier to 200%, so to speak, to build a bigger animal. The infrastructure has to change in surprising ways.
posted by LonnieK at 7:27 PM on September 29, 2012


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