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What should I look for in a movie poster frame?
July 23, 2012 9:40 AM   Subscribe

Tell me about framing movie posters. Tips. Frames. Deals. Conventions. Things to beware of.

The pulp Blade Runner cover from this metafilter post really charmed me and the large sized just became available again today. So I rushed in and got one. Why I'm pretty confident in what frames I like and the conventions that go along with framing "fine" art this is the first "movie" poster I've ever wanted/gotten.

I'd appreciate any info from movie poster fans who've framed and hung their stuff. Particularly conventions regarding matting, frame styles, and the like. I generally end up buying my frames from a place like pictureframes.com but alternative sources would be welcome as well. I live in the greater LA area so recommendations about local stores who do movie poster work with style and panache would be welcome as well. I mean, it's LA, there's gotta be someone doing this.
posted by bswinburn to Grab Bag (6 answers total) 3 users marked this as a favorite
 
movie posters tend to come in pretty standard sizes/formats, so finding a ready-made frame ($40-100) that you like is actually very likely...custom framing (~$200-500 for that size) should get you exactly what you want, but is much more expensive
posters aren't usually matted as often as other kinds of work, but it always looks nicer. if you go custom, have them cut the mat so that it is approx 1/2" to 1" bigger on the bottom (say, left right and top: 3", bottom: 3 1/2"-4")...its an optical illusion thing...art tends to have 'weight' in a frame, and if all the borders are equal, it can appear to be sliding down in the frame. a wider bottom mat can 'boost' it 'back to center', like it's resting on a foundation or something...look around at the frame shop, you'll see what i'm talking about...
and don't discount aaron brothers (there's a location on western and hollywood blvd)...they tend to be overpriced (for custom), but they do really nice work, have a large selection of ready-made frames, and have huge sales all the freaking time (often buy one, get one for a penny, but also deals on custom framing as well)...call ahead and see what they're offering...
posted by sexyrobot at 10:48 AM on July 23, 2012


Are you collecting actual vintage posters or reproductions? If you want to conserve the originals, use acid free mounts. I get my posters done at Allen Jeffries, but I'm collecting stuff from the 1920s.
posted by Ideefixe at 10:53 AM on July 23, 2012


Hollywood Poster Frames is actually out in the Valley, but does movie one-sheet specific frames in standard sizes. If the poster is original, you'll want to use archival (acid-free) mounts and UV treated glass/plexiglass.

If it's just a reproduction, you can get something pretty basic from Quick Art Frame on 3rd near Fairfax. $20 for metal frame + glass.

Both places are good about recommending matting and layout options.
posted by ikaruga at 2:30 PM on July 23, 2012


Most movie theaters use frames where all 4 sides of the frame hinge open. They're designed to make swapping out posters easy (because it happens all the time). Here's what that mechanism looks like. If you Google "movie poster snap frames" or "movie poster clip frames" you can find vendors that sell lots of different styles.

Custom framing/matting will be more expensive.

If you're not married to a full-on framing job, I really like Poster Hangers, and have used them for years.
posted by mon-ma-tron at 2:44 PM on July 23, 2012


I posted this question. I went to a place in Silicon Valley that does "you frame it". You select the materials, they cut and build the frame and you do the work. It was still expensive (huge frame, huge poster), but worth it: the frame will last a lifetime, matches the gravitas of the poster, and everything is acid-free/archival quality.
posted by plinth at 5:45 PM on July 23, 2012


I've decided to go with Holly Poster Frames with the Archival acid free backing and UV protection; I do want the poster to last. I found frames I liked more elsewhere, but I don't want to spent around $200 for a $40 poster.

Thanks for your help.
posted by bswinburn at 3:45 PM on July 27, 2012


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