Join 3,572 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)


Interview driving traffic to a website?
June 16, 2012 9:24 AM   Subscribe

I have a two part question. I've just interviewed well known performer who has just released his first solo CD. He owns all of the rights to the lyrics and music, and his own company published the CD. A radio station I'm associated with plans to put the interview online, as well as broadcast it within the week. If the musician is OK with me putting it on my own website, how might it drive traffic to his site and my site? And is there anything extra I can to make it attract listeners and drive that traffic?

The second question is that I realize I like interviewing musicians and artists. I'm good at it. And I have access to many big ones and smaller ones. If all of the legal issues line up (performance rights, lyric rights, music rights, publishing rights) as they did with this one, could I post them to my site as a way to drive traffic to my and their sites? In other words, could this turn into a niche business opportunity?
posted by CollectiveMind to Media & Arts (2 answers total) 1 user marked this as a favorite
 
If the musician is OK with me putting it on my own website, how might it drive traffic to his site and my site? And is there anything extra I can to make it attract listeners and drive that traffic?

You see if he'd be willing to link on his website to the interview as hosted on your site (although careful what you wish for, your bandwidth charges might go through the roof -- maybe consider putting the interview on SoundCloud or Youtube and embedding it?)

I don't tweet, but if I wanted to do what you're trying to do I would start a twitter account and use that to promote the interview.

You have a look at the guy's twitter account and see what sort of hashtags his fans are using to discuss him and his album. Start a twitter account (if you don't already have one) and use those hashtags to announce your interview with a link to your website.

Like this: "Just had a great interview with @musician's_twitter_handle about #album_name. We had a lot of fun doing the interview and he talked about #hashtags_topics #his_fans #on_twitter #talk_about. Check it out! t.co/whAt3ver" where the t.co URL is twitter's in-house shortening service that points to the location of your website.

Also, a day or so later "thanks @musician's_twitter_handle for a great interview! t.co/whAt3ver"

The second question is that I realize I like interviewing musicians and artists. I'm good at it. And I have access to many big ones and smaller ones. If all of the legal issues line up (performance rights, lyric rights, music rights, publishing rights) as they did with this one, could I post them to my site as a way to drive traffic to my and their sites? In other words, could this turn into a niche business opportunity?

If you're making money off of site traffic, yes. And I think the way to do this is to link to your existing interview(s) and pitch to the musicians and artists that you encounter, more-or-less thusly "I would love to interview you about your art/music/whatever. I'm an experienced interviewer who really tries to [help listeners see things from the artist's perspective / give artists a chance to pitch their ideas / whatever it is you do well]. Here are some other interviews I've done."

The subtext here is "you can trust me. I do this (semi) professionally. I'm not just some dude with a mic hoping you'll make an ass out of yourself while I'm recording."
posted by gauche at 9:50 AM on June 16, 2012 [2 favorites]


Oh, yeah, and everything I said you should do on twitter applies to FaceBook and even MySpace, too. Find the guy's fan-pages and post the interview there.
posted by gauche at 9:51 AM on June 16, 2012


« Older I have several identical Bonds...   |  Do astronauts suffer from hypn... Newer »
This thread is closed to new comments.