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Closing lines for emails
January 8, 2012 3:37 PM   Subscribe

I'm tired of closing my emails with, "Regards", "Cheers", or, "Yours sincerely". Can you give me good alternatives for all occasions, from the formal to the semi-formal to the completely casual or hilarious?
posted by KLF to Writing & Language (122 answers total) 184 users marked this as a favorite
 
In my experience, the most common meaning-neutral closer for use with strangers and acquaintances is

Best,
posted by threeants at 3:39 PM on January 8, 2012 [4 favorites]


I say "take care" and "happy trails" a lot. And sometimes I close with something totally random, like "cheese" or "hello" or "your mom".

I have weird friends, though, so make sure you know your audience.
posted by phunniemee at 3:41 PM on January 8, 2012 [2 favorites]


Kick out the jams,

KLF
posted by AkzidenzGrotesk at 3:42 PM on January 8, 2012 [16 favorites]


I use "Best," a lot, as do most of the academics (generally historians) with whom I correspond.
posted by naturalog at 3:46 PM on January 8, 2012 [4 favorites]


"End transmission"?
posted by Jonathan Livengood at 3:48 PM on January 8, 2012 [15 favorites]


"Don't lose touch after graduation!"
posted by drjimmy11 at 3:50 PM on January 8, 2012 [2 favorites]


Kind regards.
posted by BlahLaLa at 3:50 PM on January 8, 2012 [1 favorite]


There's a built in from field. I don't see a need to put anything else.
posted by Brian Puccio at 3:51 PM on January 8, 2012


As phunniemee says, it's fun to just throw in the whackiest thing you can think of ... if you can be fairly sure that it will not be misinterpreted.
I'll say, "From the Desk of The President", or "Cynically Yours", or whatever seems to fit the mood of the email.

Signed, Captain Marvelous

(his mark) X
posted by Hobgoblin at 3:51 PM on January 8, 2012 [1 favorite]


My closest friends and favourite family members get LYTB. Love ya to bits.
posted by malibustacey9999 at 3:52 PM on January 8, 2012


Often, I just don't use it and simply close my emails with a couple of blank lines and a couple of dashes after my name. like this.

--rmd1023
posted by rmd1023 at 3:53 PM on January 8, 2012


I have always alternated between a few:

Toodle Pip (a Bertie Woosterism)
Beer & Skittles
Rock, Roll, Rinse, Repeat
Try not to get any on ya
Fair Winds and a dog to blame it on
See you in the funny papers
This one time at band camp...oh never mind
Made you look
Your (generic pronoun for relative of the opposite sex) says hi
Collect call from Manson again, back later
Say hi to Larry and Shemp for me


etc
posted by timsteil at 3:55 PM on January 8, 2012 [10 favorites]


I'm partial to "Keep on rocking in the free world," and also (on the other end of the spectrum), "cordially." No one uses "cordially" anymore. I also have used "kick out the jams."
posted by Countess Sandwich at 3:57 PM on January 8, 2012 [1 favorite]


Best fishes,
posted by Windigo at 3:59 PM on January 8, 2012 [7 favorites]


Usually I use "Warmly," "Best," or "Kind regards."
posted by sucre at 4:00 PM on January 8, 2012


I use Best occasionally, but I have encountered the opinion more than once (not from correspondents but on the interwebs) that 'Best' is some sort of subtle FU.
posted by yoink at 4:02 PM on January 8, 2012 [5 favorites]


Pick the most outlying or strangest noun in the body of the email, then improperly adjectivize it. i.e.
outlying-ly yours,
cl
posted by Cold Lurkey at 4:06 PM on January 8, 2012 [3 favorites]


Stay gold, Pony Boy.
posted by cooker girl at 4:07 PM on January 8, 2012 [20 favorites]


Rather:

Stay gold, Pony Boy.

-KLF
posted by cooker girl at 4:07 PM on January 8, 2012 [2 favorites]


I picked up the " Best" habit from emailing academics.

" Die with Honor" is a probibly favorite, but you have to make sure the person you're sending it to understands. That and " Hail Satan"
posted by The Whelk at 4:10 PM on January 8, 2012 [6 favorites]


May death come swiftly to your enemies,
posted by eugenen at 4:10 PM on January 8, 2012 [23 favorites]


"Yours in [noun]"

-Trust
-Struggle
-Bed
posted by benbenson at 4:14 PM on January 8, 2012 [1 favorite]


I like simple using

Yours,
(Name Here)
posted by shortyJBot at 4:15 PM on January 8, 2012


I use

All the best,
Abbril
posted by Abbril at 4:16 PM on January 8, 2012


Irritably yours,
Yours in Christ, (works ironically or sincerely!)
I.H.S.V., (“By this sign, conquer”)
Per aspera ad astra, (“Through hardships to the stars”)

and I enjoy the occasional,

Hah!
posted by cloudburst at 4:20 PM on January 8, 2012 [3 favorites]


May the force be with you
-General KLF

I never sign off by using the above closing, but I really like it. Especially since it can be used sincerely or ironically!

I prefer to stick with "Sincerely," which is something that you probably don't want to use as much since you already use 'Yours, Sincerely." I really like when professors write "Best," but I dislike when people say "Thanks," because it seems so meaningless to insert that at the end of the email.
posted by sincerely-s at 4:24 PM on January 8, 2012


Keep you flavour tight
posted by no regrets, coyote at 4:24 PM on January 8, 2012


Oh, and I’d be remiss in not mentioning, from the great George Carlin:

May the forces of evil become confused on the way to your house,
posted by cloudburst at 4:27 PM on January 8, 2012 [16 favorites]


I don't like "Best" so much, but I often use "Best wishes"; and I often do "Thanks again" or "Thanking you" if I've been asking for/about something. For friends, it's "Hugs".
posted by thylacinthine at 4:28 PM on January 8, 2012


Tepid regards, ---
Adequate wishes, ---
Hollow pleasantries, ---
Civilly, ---
posted by en forme de poire at 4:29 PM on January 8, 2012 [40 favorites]


I rarely end an email with a closing, although I often end the more formal emails with "Thank you for your time and attention." Letters usually get something like "Yours," for formal, "Fondly" for friends, "Your Humble Obedient Servant" for special friends, and "Yours in the Name of the Worm which Dieth Not" for the friends who know where the bodies are.
posted by GenjiandProust at 4:31 PM on January 8, 2012


Hoping to hear from you before the Apocalypse,
posted by easily confused at 4:40 PM on January 8, 2012 [1 favorite]


I agree with the poster(s) above who mentioned that "Best" is like a subtle FU.

Warm regards,
With thanks,
Best wishes,
Thank you,
Thinking of you,
See you in the car, Milhouse.
posted by nathaole at 4:42 PM on January 8, 2012 [3 favorites]


Without Wax,

Oflinkey
posted by oflinkey at 4:45 PM on January 8, 2012 [2 favorites]


(In before the people who tell me "sincerely" does not really come from "sine cera." I know. But the idea is still around enough).
posted by oflinkey at 4:48 PM on January 8, 2012 [1 favorite]


"See you in the car" is definitely my favorite. I also like "Die with Honor," "Best," and "Stay gold, Ponyboy," but I came to suggest appropriate holiday tidings, as well as acknowledgement of general goings-on ("I hope you're having a pleasant sabbatical," &c.).
posted by stoneandstar at 4:49 PM on January 8, 2012 [3 favorites]


In Solidarity,

Macska
posted by macska at 4:49 PM on January 8, 2012


Talk to you soon,
posted by smirkyfodder at 4:51 PM on January 8, 2012


oxen!
What ho!
I like exclamation points, goodbye!
May all your emails go to their intended recipients,
From,
-KLF

(I don't recommend using any of these together.)
posted by iamkimiam at 4:52 PM on January 8, 2012 [8 favorites]


Love and other indoor sports,
G
posted by gnomeloaf at 4:53 PM on January 8, 2012 [3 favorites]


In practice I use "Best", "All the best", or "Best wishes". However, I sometimes use "Peace", "Peace demands" (a silly anglicization of Hebrew "drishat shalom"), and "Protect yo' neck", among others.
posted by kengraham at 4:53 PM on January 8, 2012


Nthing that all the academics I know use "Best" as their closing. I recommend it. I do not like it. Late at night, at my most paranoid, I have been known to open an email, stare at the closing, and wonder if all these professors are bragging about themselves.

In other words: "Best wishes" for the win!
posted by artemisia at 4:53 PM on January 8, 2012 [4 favorites]


Yeah, "Best" just gets up my nose (and I'm an academic FWIW) - it's not so much that it's a FU, but that it just hangs there non-grammatically, devoid of content, a thought unfinished. It's not meaning-neutral, it's perfunctory. At least the classics such as "Yours sincerely" or "Regards" have a semblance of content. "Best" is just a lazy little fart in the wind.

I use "Regards" unless there is content in the mail that might indicate "best wishes" or "thanks" or "love" are in order. 90% of emails don't need anything other than a name, anyway. Obviously, tailoring to the content is the key, as some of the above responses indicate.
posted by Rumple at 4:53 PM on January 8, 2012 [5 favorites]


I also dislike "Best", and never use it.

I tend to use "thanks" a lot when I'm communicating with a superior. It does risk sounding ingratiating unless there's even a remote reason for thanking the person, but it's become a habit.
posted by redlines at 5:01 PM on January 8, 2012


I once received an email that was intended for someone else; it appeared to be business-related, but he signed it:
Fuckin awesome,
[His name]
I can't say I'd recommend it for general use, but it certainly made an impression.
posted by Sibrax at 5:03 PM on January 8, 2012 [8 favorites]


I frequently use "Best wishes," and, because I do a lot of correspondence with members of my fraternity "Fraternally and Amicably," or "Fraternally and Cordially," which has resulted in the occasional us of "Cordially,".


I hate "Best," although I have used it on occassion.
posted by driley at 5:08 PM on January 8, 2012


"Best Regards," is a neutral seeming mish mash.
posted by The Whelk at 5:09 PM on January 8, 2012


yrs sincerely &c.,

says,

yrs. in perpetual struggle,

abba zabba chicken dinner,
posted by jessamyn at 5:11 PM on January 8, 2012 [2 favorites]


The Victorians were fond of Yr. Ob. Srvt., which stood for Your Obedient Servant. I occasionally use this, albeit with tongue firmly inserted into my cheek.
posted by driley at 5:30 PM on January 8, 2012 [2 favorites]


See ya,
Hasta la pasta,
Auf Wiedersehen,
xoxo,
Tootleloo,
Okay? Right!
What say you?
M



Fondly,
Best,
Thanks again,
(proper first name all spelled out)

posted by mmmcmmm at 5:33 PM on January 8, 2012 [2 favorites]


Oh my god, not "Best". I'm not sure why but this rubs me the wrong way. I think I associate it with people who are not fluent in English.
posted by madcaptenor at 5:34 PM on January 8, 2012 [1 favorite]


Keep your nose clean --

or, alternatively,

I'll see you in hell --

I've signed thank you cards with the latter.
posted by Alison at 5:35 PM on January 8, 2012 [1 favorite]


Onwards and upwards,
posted by the duck by the oboe at 5:37 PM on January 8, 2012


Business emails get closed with:

Thanks,
Bilabial

Personal emails with:
Best,
Bilabial
posted by bilabial at 5:43 PM on January 8, 2012


Please remain favorably disposed towards your loving friend,
posted by StickyCarpet at 5:44 PM on January 8, 2012 [4 favorites]


Up your nose with a rubber hose,

Lenny and Squiggy
KLF
posted by jerseygirl at 5:46 PM on January 8, 2012


Thank Ye or Cooperatively Yours. (I work at a co-op, though.)
posted by a humble nudibranch at 5:50 PM on January 8, 2012


Peace Out!

Later.

I got bored with all of the clsoings and now I just sign my name.
posted by Yellow at 5:51 PM on January 8, 2012


I like the "hunter s" close, something like:

The hens have been slaughtered,
The foxes are fat,
Yet I remain,

Roboton666
posted by roboton666 at 5:52 PM on January 8, 2012 [2 favorites]


Best is definitely favored among the college professors/administrators/officious students I email with. I think it seems sort of cold and distant (and annoying when people my age use it). Professors quite often just sign off with their initials.

Kind Regards, is a nice one I came across in the UK.

I personally use Thanks, and sometimes Thanks very much, but only when I'm asking questions or a favor of someone. Otherwise I use Sincerely (I like the old fashioned uh, sincerity of it). Or just "-Margaret" for casual emails or when I'm emailing back and forth multiple times with someone.
posted by MadamM at 6:01 PM on January 8, 2012 [2 favorites]


If I made any request of the recipient, I close with

Thanks so much!
Weeping_angel

If I didn't ask or have any reason to thank them, I just leave a space and put

-Weeping_angel
posted by Weeping_angel at 6:01 PM on January 8, 2012


Also using popular songs can be fun:

Hey you,
Get off of my cloud,

I heard it-
Through the grapevine

And-
As we wind on down the road

It's the-
End of the world as we know it

(conversely)

We didn't-
Start the fire

I'm,
Too sexy for my shirt

Here we are now,
Entertain us

Papa don't preach,
I'm in trouble see

Friday,
I'm in love

(ad naseum!)
posted by roboton666 at 6:02 PM on January 8, 2012 [2 favorites]


Some suggestions in this thread about parting phrases for letters to replace the standard "Sincerely," "Yours,"
posted by mlis at 6:03 PM on January 8, 2012


Yours till Niagara falls
(others from that book):
Yours till bacon strips
Yours till Bear Mountain has cubs

(along the same lines):
Yours till the kitchen sinks
Yours till the board walks
Yours till the tree barks
Yours till the toilet bowls
posted by Houstonian at 6:10 PM on January 8, 2012 [4 favorites]


Smiles
posted by dean_deen at 6:12 PM on January 8, 2012


You might like some of these closing suggestions, too.

(My favorite is "OMG the dog's on fire!")
posted by misha at 6:13 PM on January 8, 2012 [1 favorite]


One of my favorite friends always closes with:

From the heart of my bottom,
xx
posted by WaspEnterprises at 6:18 PM on January 8, 2012 [1 favorite]


Once in a while, I'll through out

Peace, Love, and Understanding,
smirkette
posted by smirkette at 6:21 PM on January 8, 2012 [2 favorites]


'Best' and 'Thanks' can come off as a little cold, but I think it depends more on context than anything else.

Here are a few I like better:

Speak with you soon,

All my best,

Warmly,
posted by yellowcandy at 6:25 PM on January 8, 2012 [1 favorite]


MMMBop,
KLF
posted by argonauta at 6:33 PM on January 8, 2012 [4 favorites]


Be well,

Anitanita
posted by anitanita at 6:40 PM on January 8, 2012 [1 favorite]


Hahaha. These are great. Thanks for brightening my work day!
posted by KLF at 6:41 PM on January 8, 2012


Rock on,
posted by mullingitover at 7:12 PM on January 8, 2012 [1 favorite]


I use Best for when I'm bringing down my rage on a lax collegue or employee. I know it sounds cold, I am a cold hearted killer and don't u forget it sucka.

With friends, I will often copy Sifl n Ollies sign off phrase:

ROCK
posted by Potomac Avenue at 8:07 PM on January 8, 2012


I like that a friend of mine always writes "take care."

I am a big fan of modifiers: "Longwindedly," "Absurdly," "Hungrily," depending upon what's being discussed.
posted by mlle valentine at 8:15 PM on January 8, 2012 [6 favorites]


Actual closings I have used:

1. Love, peace and hair grease,

2. Later, gator!

3. Best,

4. I want my $2,

5. Smoke me a kipper, I'll be back for breakfast,

6. See ya!

7. Hit me with your rhythm stick,

8. Hugs and kisses ("bisous bisous" is also good; it's French for "kisses"),
posted by droplet at 8:21 PM on January 8, 2012 [1 favorite]


And my default sign-off to friends and/or acquaintances is "Hope you're doing well."
posted by mlle valentine at 8:21 PM on January 8, 2012


"So there"
posted by Etrigan at 8:21 PM on January 8, 2012 [5 favorites]


Yippee ki-ay,
[name]

No, I just use my first name.
posted by jwmollman at 8:27 PM on January 8, 2012 [1 favorite]


Take it easy, but take it -
posted by Kloryne at 8:28 PM on January 8, 2012


Ciao

Adios

Aloha

Manana

Mahalo
posted by maurreen at 8:30 PM on January 8, 2012


If you're a dude, the ironic "You go girl," is always fun; doubly so if they're a Community fan.
posted by _frog at 9:02 PM on January 8, 2012 [1 favorite]


muchlove,

KTHANXBYE
posted by zix at 9:06 PM on January 8, 2012 [1 favorite]


SWAK
LYLAS
Stay in school!
Hugs not Drugs,
Don't take any wooden nickels,
Cheers for Queers,
YOU BETTA WORK.
posted by Lieber Frau at 9:31 PM on January 8, 2012 [1 favorite]


Surrounded by academics, yet not at the stage where it's not presumptuous simply to sign off with my initials, I've fallen into the "best" habit, although I totally agree with Rumple's send-up of it.

However the worst sign-off in my opinion is "Regards". Something about that just feels incredibly icy. It's consonant-heavy, clipped, and is basically the verbal equivalent of a simultaneous slap in the face while getting the finger. "Warmest regards" is even worse, with its ironic faux warmth, and I reserve it for break-up emails and bitchy-polite replies to students asking for extensions.
posted by UniversityNomad at 9:38 PM on January 8, 2012 [4 favorites]


I have seen people use:

Blessings

Love and Blessings
posted by User7 at 9:48 PM on January 8, 2012


"So say we all,

daisystomper"
posted by daisystomper at 9:48 PM on January 8, 2012


"Much love,"
posted by kylej at 9:50 PM on January 8, 2012


Tenderly,

Platonically yours,
posted by Gilbert at 10:43 PM on January 8, 2012


I also used to do the "[random adverb] yours" route ("Irrepressibly yours," "Ostentatiously yours," "Incorrigibly yours" "Convivially yours" "Irrevocably yours after 7 days from date of purchase" "Yours every Sunday, Wednesday and sometimes lunch hours if I'm not too busy," "Yours is mine but mine is still mine,") but something a bit more tailored to your addressee is definitely better. Stuff I've used:

"[Muchos] Besos [y abrazos]," - to a friend who loves the Spanish football team

"deine [my name]" - to a college friend I took German classes with. I usually start with "Liebe [her name]".

"Don't ever change, you hungry little bashful hound" - to a Rufus Wainwright fan. Or some other apt lyric from his/her favorite song or artist.

To someone who grew up in the 80s, when these really corny acronyms were popular: "J.A.P.A.N." (Just Always Pray At Night) or "I.T.A.L.Y." (I Trust And Love You), or some other country, and I'll just make something up.

But sometimes I admit I get lazy and just use "Talk to you soon!", "See you around!", "Keep on chuggin'/truckin'/swimming!", "Keep warm" (for winter time), "Keep safe", "Stay smexy," "Bee [drawn picture of a bee] happy", "With a hunka hunka burnin' love," or whatever random thing comes to mind at the moment: "Money up front", "I remain / but an egg," "Don't be a stranger", "The voice in your head when you reach for that third doughnut," "Wishing you days of light-hearted laughter and nights of hot booty," etc.

Or just: "Have a good weekend!" Why not? I'd actually appreciate that, in (semi-formal) work e-mails.
posted by pimli at 1:03 AM on January 9, 2012 [3 favorites]


Actually seen in a business context (although perhaps not recommended): "Brgds."

From the French (these are still in very common usage):
"I present to you my most distinguished sentiments"
"I beg you to accept my sincerest salutations"
"Please believe, Madam, in my very best wishes"
posted by ohio at 1:51 AM on January 9, 2012 [4 favorites]


Peace, love and pitbulls,
Kind regards,
Many thanks,
Mother says "word",
Pax,
posted by gonzo_ID at 2:19 AM on January 9, 2012


For work, it's always:
Thanks, [me]

If it's a more formal email, it's:
Thanks,
[me]

But I work in a service profession, so almost all of my communications are asking for something, or have the implied "thank you for your patronage" in them.

A thing I really hate is using a dash instead of a comma. Not so much at the end, but at the beginning, it always comes off as ignorant. The written version of starting a telephone call without a greeting.

I always enjoyed switching it up in a different way. Using standard valedictions, but mixing it up by signing the wrong name. Stolen from Monty Python.

Warmly,
Emotobot 2000

Yours sincerely,
HRH Queen Victoria

Truly yours,
Harry S Truman

Most sincerely,
Rasputin

Yours in Christ,
Pope John Paul I, (Mrs.)

Droplet: I love "I want my $2"!
posted by gjc at 4:31 AM on January 9, 2012 [2 favorites]


There's always "Pip-Pip!"....
posted by guy72277 at 4:40 AM on January 9, 2012


May you crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and hear the lamentation of their women.
posted by namewithoutwords at 5:25 AM on January 9, 2012 [2 favorites]


Hey:

Blahblahblabhalhblahblabhlabhalbhlablah. Blahabhlabhlahblablah? Blah blah.

Be well,

Name
posted by 23skidoo at 7:42 AM on January 9, 2012


There have been some "respectfully yours" in my work inbox lately and within the context, I'm lovin' it.

There is no effing telling how I might close a personal email, and I'm pretty lose about emails to work buddies (if the email will not be retained), but for most work emails I try to mirror the sender or someone in their group. This is lame, but I am not ashamed!

Your in work-avoidance surfing,
Shrew
posted by Lesser Shrew at 8:22 AM on January 9, 2012


Excelsior!
posted by Lucinda at 8:42 AM on January 9, 2012


You may be tired of closing your emails with "Cheers", but it works exceptionally well for most mortals.

Cheers
Lalochezia
posted by lalochezia at 9:17 AM on January 9, 2012


In accordance with the prophesy,
posted by Twicketface at 9:50 AM on January 9, 2012 [4 favorites]


Keep fighting the good fight
Hugs and kisses (you should probably only use this one when addressing those you would actually hug and/or kiss)
posted by honeydew at 9:54 AM on January 9, 2012


I've used:

Ttyl, (= talk to you later)
\m/*.*\m/ (=rock on)

At work I like:

Thanks,
Regards,
Best regards,

or just my first name
posted by Dragonness at 9:59 AM on January 9, 2012


I routinely use "Best" for nonpersonal e-mail and do not understand the hate for it ("it just hangs there non-grammatically"—like just about every other conventional greeting or signoff; what's the grammatical context for "Hi"?). For "completely casual or hilarious," I sometimes go with "Hang by your thumbs," which I haven't seen listed yet.
posted by languagehat at 10:06 AM on January 9, 2012 [1 favorite]


I sign all e-mails I make with people who work in TV, newspapers, magizines etc with "Keep fuckin that chicken".
posted by The Devil Tesla at 10:16 AM on January 9, 2012


In high school, I used to sign off "L8R SK8R." This is more effective if you have a mohawk or other weird hair or actually ride a skateboard around.
posted by *s at 11:01 AM on January 9, 2012 [1 favorite]


"Yours aye", if you'd like something quaintly archaic
posted by genesta at 11:16 AM on January 9, 2012


To close an invitation:

"Come as you are, or wear pants."
posted by arcticwoman at 11:25 AM on January 9, 2012 [5 favorites]


Stay classy.
posted by secretseasons at 12:34 PM on January 9, 2012 [1 favorite]


My work emails always end with:
Thanks,
BlueJayWay

My colleagues in the UK (seemingly every single one of them) use "Regards," for normal emails and "Kind Regards," when they're telling you to piss off.

I'm fond of:
Yar,
BJW
posted by bluejayway at 1:47 PM on January 9, 2012


I have to e-mail strangers a lot in my job, so I like "Kindest Regards".

It's not flippant or too personal, but it seems warmer than something like "Best", which just feels extremely impersonal and cold.
posted by exceptinsects at 2:45 PM on January 9, 2012


ttfn,

Tigger
posted by mcstayinskool at 6:12 PM on January 9, 2012 [1 favorite]


Sent from my iPhone
posted by amitai at 9:50 PM on January 9, 2012 [10 favorites]


Got to sign off now, the zombies are breaking in again;

Write again soon, but I think they're reading my mail;

Send money, and by the way, do you know a good lawyer?

Insincerely yours,

The voices say to tell you 'hi'!
posted by easily confused at 7:33 AM on January 10, 2012


I remain your most faithful servant in the ancient genderless glory of Our Lady Cybele,
posted by Zozo at 12:03 PM on January 10, 2012


"take care" - pleasant sounding, subtly threatening.

"See you in hell (from heaven)"
posted by justsomebodythatyouusedtoknow at 3:37 PM on January 10, 2012


I know where you live,
posted by Rinku at 11:40 PM on January 10, 2012 [2 favorites]


Take luck! Take luck and care. Take care of the luck. Take care of the luck you might have.
posted by filthy light thief at 10:13 AM on January 11, 2012 [1 favorite]


justsomebodythatyouusedtoknow: "take care" - pleasant sounding, subtly threatening.

More subtly threatening: "take care of the ones you love"
posted by filthy light thief at 10:14 AM on January 11, 2012 [1 favorite]


And my auto-closer is

Thank you, and have a good day -
filthy light thief
[job title]
_________________
[Employer Name]
[Employer address]
[Office phone number]
[Work email address]
posted by filthy light thief at 10:17 AM on January 11, 2012


I have had many acquaintances and coworkers go for the blithe and sophisticated "Ciao" sign-off, only to heartbreakingly, pitiably, miserably end up spelling it "Chow."

And, once, I got "Chao." The signoff is not a good place to memorably mangle!
posted by sestaaak at 11:52 AM on January 11, 2012


Love
Mad love
See ya
Onward
Heya
Ciao ciao
Press on
posted by thinkpiece at 4:53 AM on January 12, 2012


Purity, Resistance, Rebellion,
KLF
posted by mcstayinskool at 8:42 PM on March 1, 2012


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