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Should I apply to this position in another team or just let it go and try new company?
August 10, 2011 12:24 PM   Subscribe

Should I apply to this position in another team or just let it go and try new company? Please suggest.

I work as a consultant, my work is finishing up in less than 2 months and the team decided not to extend my work. And an oppurtunity to work for a different team in the same city/same company has come up.

The reason my work is wrapping up, is I am quoting my manager "Team decided to cut back the budget we can allocate and ur performance is not a major factor in the decision" Okay, now if I apply to the new position in the same company, obviously my current manager would be contacted for reference that is expected.

Given what my manager told me the words "not a major factor" bothers me in how he will respond to the other team.

Should I apply to this position or just let it go and try new company?

Please suggest.
posted by daveg02 to Work & Money (8 answers total)
 
Do you have a good reason not to go for that other position?
posted by Tomorrowful at 12:25 PM on August 10, 2011 [1 favorite]


You might as well apply - what have you got to lose? Even if you don't get it, you may get an interview which will give you the opportunity to practice interviewing skills at the very least.
posted by hazyjane at 12:33 PM on August 10, 2011 [1 favorite]


I would apply AND try applying at new companies.
posted by sweetkid at 12:35 PM on August 10, 2011 [1 favorite]


I think my manager's rating of me would be like this "not dissappointed, but not impressed either, definetly should be proactive"

I do not know how people would seek ex-team's manager referral in the same company,
how much would this kind of feedback would hurt my chance even if I do well in the interview.

Thats my concern.
posted by daveg02 at 12:47 PM on August 10, 2011


Until you pointed out the phrase, I was reading it as "not a major factor in our decision", but now that you've isolated the point, I understand that you're reading it as "not a major factor" -- which is understandable.

But I don't think that's a good reason not to interview for the other position. If anything, it will give you clarification with your position in the company. And you're going to have to interview somewhere, right? Better the place where you might/probably have an in and definitely have experience than banking that something else will definitely come along.
posted by MCMikeNamara at 12:48 PM on August 10, 2011


This happens all the time where I work. One project runs out of money and contractors are let go. Sometimes we are able to move a contractor to a new team. This is a win for everyone. We have people that remain contractors (by choice) and move from team to team for years.

I do not know how people would seek ex-team's manager referral in the same company,
how much would this kind of feedback would hurt my chance even if I do well in the interview.


I have managers walk over to me and ask me about contractors all the time. We usually keep contractors unless they are major screw ups. It is a pain in the ass to staff up projects, and is a total crap shoot, so people we have already worked with tend to stick around.

That being said, awesome contractors are usually introduced around so they usually just end up on a new team without interviews. But this is just another opportunity to show you are awesome.
posted by Ad hominem at 12:53 PM on August 10, 2011 [1 favorite]


Should have previewed first - sorry.

Based on your read, I see your concern, but we've hired contractors who have had "good, not great" recommendations from people in the company when they've seemed right for the position and had good interviews because we knew what we were getting and their weaknesses weren't necessarily something that affected what we were looking for.

Sometimes people ask internally. Sometimes they don't (as I can attest from seeing contractors in the building hired by others who probably would never have gotten hired if somebody had asked me/my team). And sometimes we ask people, but don't go with their opinion because we've worked with the internal people before and don't trust their judgment but that's a different dysfunctional all together. In other words, I'd not freeze yourself out just because you feel like you may not get an "A++++ recommendation." Unless it is a huge investment in time and will take you from other opportunities, I'd still say go for it because as the lotto ads say, you can't win if you don't play.
posted by MCMikeNamara at 12:58 PM on August 10, 2011 [3 favorites]


I think that MCMikeNamara is on the money. You're understandably peeved that you perceive that you're not getting a blockbuster review. As a director, this sounds like something I might have said meaning that the major factors were budget, lack of buy-in from the board, logistics. It's not about you.

Don't let it knock your confidence, you should go for the position for which you are a known quantity which puts you at the front of the pack, an absence of ticker tape parades notwithstanding - particularly in this economy.

Smart, high achieving people often think that when we leave a position the company simply cannot continue without then and that their jersey should be hung from the rafters. Business, sadly ain't like that, however much the likes of you and I would like it to be.
posted by dmt at 1:18 PM on August 10, 2011 [3 favorites]


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