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Cell Food. Really?
August 8, 2011 8:28 AM   Subscribe

"Cell Food." Really?

So my significant other swears by "Cell Food." So do countless people online. So do the people at Whole Foods. So do numerous reviews on amazon.

But I'm a natural born skeptic and I can't bring myself to shell out $30 for a product that could be snake oil.

But could the placebo effect really be powerful enough for so many people to be convinced? What gives here?

Does anyone have (admittedly anecdotal) thoughts?

Thanks in advance!
posted by jefficator to Health & Fitness (10 answers total) 2 users marked this as a favorite
 
It's just another trend, like Crystal Gravy.
posted by Brocktoon at 8:30 AM on August 8, 2011


But could the placebo effect really be powerful enough for so many people to be convinced?

Yes, especially if they want to believe.

From the website:
CELLFOOD utilizes a proprietary water-splitting technology that provides a powerful stream of bio-available oxygen plus 129 nutrients directly to the cells.

That's supposed to sound sciencey, but it means absolutely nothing. You cannot deliver oxygen (or anything else) "directly to cells". The body gets things to cells via its own internal processes.
posted by lholladay at 8:33 AM on August 8, 2011 [4 favorites]


From the American Cancer Society: Available scientific evidence does not support claims that putting oxygen-releasing chemicals into a person's body is effective in treating cancer. It may even be dangerous. There have been reports of patient deaths from this method.
posted by desjardins at 8:33 AM on August 8, 2011 [2 favorites]


Ugh, I feel dirty for googling that, and of course there's probably some dietitian somewhere who stamped an approval with their name.

Save your money.
posted by P.o.B. at 8:38 AM on August 8, 2011


lol

Cellfood (Cell Food) marketing is unscientific nonsense. Cellfood may function as well as any generic multivitamin, but you'd have to look at the label for specific vitamin/mineral content (hopefully there's a label, I can't find anything online). Cellfood claims about oxygen are complete fantasy.
posted by thirteenkiller at 8:48 AM on August 8, 2011 [1 favorite]



So my significant other swears by "Cell Food." So do countless people online. So do the people at Whole Foods. So do numerous reviews on amazon.


The two most common elements in the universe are Hydrogen and stupidity.
Harlan Ellison

Please don't buy this antiscientific woo-gargling nonsense.
posted by lalochezia at 8:48 AM on August 8, 2011 [2 favorites]


Sloan-Kettering on this crap
posted by mkultra at 8:52 AM on August 8, 2011


Remember that "Oxygen Water" stuff?

I happened to be at an event where one of the original hucksters of that product was handing it out. I asked him what delivered more oxygen to the body, a bottle of his water or a deep breath. He didn't feel like answering me.

This is a scam too.
posted by Aquaman at 8:54 AM on August 8, 2011


It makes no sense to claim that delivering more oxygen to the cells than your body wants will prevent or cure cancer. Oxygen itself is our major carcinogen, the price we pay for being oxygen-breathers.
posted by Ery at 8:56 AM on August 8, 2011 [2 favorites]


There's plenty of woo-busting above, but this is my favorite:

NuScience Corporation has manufactured Everett Storey’s original CELLFOOD formula containing 78 minerals, 34 enzymes, and 17 amino acids.

You know what else will have 78 minerals (most in trace amounts) at least 34 enzymes and likely 20 amino acids? A hot dog.
posted by Mister Fabulous at 9:04 AM on August 8, 2011 [14 favorites]


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