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Can't see the wood for the trees
June 27, 2011 5:52 PM   Subscribe

Calling Active Directory / Exchange gurus - I want to know more than you ;-)

Imagine I've never heard of either Active Directory or Exchange but I want to know a good deal about them at a conceptual and practical level. I don't want to become an Active Directory or Exchange administrator but I do want to be able to confidently discuss, at some depth, their workings and application.

Assume that I know a significant amount about networking and IT infrastructure and that reading code doesn't frighten me.

What would you suggest in the way of reading to take me from "only dimly aware they exist" to the priesthood ?

Just be quite clear: I prefer books with code listings than books with screen dumps ... if you catch my drift .... and; I'm not so interested in "how you do X" as "why you might wish to do X"
posted by southof40 to Computers & Internet (2 answers total) 2 users marked this as a favorite
 
Most anything that you can learn about LDAP will apply to Active Directory (seeing as it is a specialized LDAP directory). I've met one of the authors of the O'Reilly Active Directory book and they seemed like nice chaps. However, that book won't cover any of the new details that Win2k8 and Win2k8 R2 brought to the party.

As for Exchange->AD integration, essentially your learning will consist of understanding the additional schema elements that Exchange adds to AD and how Exchange leverages them. I don't have book suggestion but do suggest that you get familiar with Powershell. The latest version of Exchange is heavily emphasizing Powershell as an automation tool.
posted by mmascolino at 10:11 PM on June 27, 2011


I don't want to become an Active Directory or Exchange administrator but I do want to be able to confidently discuss, at some depth, their workings and application.

This is odd because 'being an admin' is the best path to 'confidently discuss their workings and application'. There just isn't a written guide that covers everything. Without that hands-on, you're limited to discussing theory - how a book or guideline or design document states some feature should work. That's not an expert, IMO anyway. Would you say this is more of an architect or designer role?

Anyway, in addition to above, check MSFT design guides, specifically the AD guide. Also AD uses DNS heavily so an understanding of DNS is crucial as well. This MSFT AD course seems to cover all the major areas. Check out materials covering sections of the curriculum and you should have a good start.
posted by anti social order at 12:30 PM on June 28, 2011


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