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How can I make my honeymoon in New England run smoothly?
May 24, 2011 6:14 AM   Subscribe

My fiancée and I are hoping to spend a fortnight in New England for our honeymoon in October. I'd love your advice on how to make our honeymoon run smoothly!

Having recently moved and changed jobs, whilst planing the wedding, we've kind of forgotten to arrange our honeymoon!

We've had some ideas, but I've got a few questions that I'm struggling to find answers to elsewhere.

Our rough plan is to fly into and out of Logan in Boston, spend the first few nights in a nice hotel nearby (Advice would be great here!), and then tour around a bit in-between.

1) What will the weather be like? We live in England, so are used to cold and rain, but not sure we want to spend our whole honeymoon sliding along a snow-covered road, is driving likely to be a problem? I'm a confident driver, and I've driven in Florida, but I've not got much experience of driving in "winter" weather, just a few snowy days here.

2) We both like museums, nice villages, lazy lunches and aren't too concerned about nightlife (although an evening drink in a nice pub/bar never gets turned down!). We're also a fan of theme parks. Are these kind of things going to be open? I know if you went to English seaside resorts in October you wouldn't find much open.

3) I'd love to get out and explore a bit, but equally, I don't want our holiday to become 12 hours a day in the car. What is a sensible itinerary to see lots, but without racing around?
I'm overwhelmed by the amount of recommendations on Google, and some of them to me look a bit packed. After using Google Maps to plan some long-distance routes around Europe, I'm also a bit sceptical of their times and wouldn't want to use just that to make my decisions.

4) Is it possible to get into/out of Canada? We'd love to see Montreal, but I don't know how the border "works" with an English couple on tourist visa? Is it a sensible drive?

5) I'd love to checkout an NHL game if possible, when is the schedule announced and how easy is it to get tickets for the Bruins? I know someone on holiday in England would really struggle to get tickets for most Premier League Football games.

6) Are there any MeFi meetups planned?!

Thanks in advance!
posted by chrispy108 to Travel & Transportation (37 answers total) 6 users marked this as a favorite
 
This Yankee would love to help you. I currently live north of Boston but am familar with a good chunk of New England and eastern Canada. Memail me and I'll help if I can.
posted by pentagoet at 6:29 AM on May 24, 2011


Boston to Montreal is just over a 5 hour drive, entirely doable, and I think most of New England is within 5 hours of Boston, except some of northern Maine. October is unlikely to have snow. NHL game tickets are unlikely, unless you go to Ottawa (just under 2 hours from Montreal, but Ottawa is not a very good team). Museums and lunches and nice stores will generally be open, but I would not imagine theme parks would be (the one I used to go to in Maine shuts in early September, as does the one in Montreal).
posted by jeather at 6:30 AM on May 24, 2011 [1 favorite]


You won't be sliding around in snow, that's for sure.

October can either be quite lovely and fairly warm or rainy and downright cold. There's no predicting it. But having grown up in northern New England and being a resident of the area you wish to visit, I will say that you should not anticipate on wearing shorts, but it wouldn't hurt to have a few short sleeve shirts, some sweatshirts or light jackets, and a rain jacket on you for a New England visit.

If you'll be staying in Boston, you won't want to drive. Unless you're planning on traveling and staying outside of Boston, it's not worth renting a car. If you plan on traveling and primarily staying outside of the Greater Boston Area, then yes, you'll probably want to rent a car. Otherwise, take the T and the commuter rail. Much cheaper.

There are tons of museums in Boston proper, as well as in towns outside of Boston. Salem, MA has the Peabody Essex Museum. Boston has the Museum of Fine Arts, the Museum of Modern Art, the Institute of Contemporary Art. In Concord you have an American life history museum. There's no shortage of museums in the Boston area.

You could also think of heading out to Western Mass and checking out Sturbridge Village or head to Plymouth for Plimouth Plantation.

Canobie Lake Park in Salem, NH is likely to still be open for limited hours in October. They do some big Halloween events, so they do stay open a bit later than other New England theme parks. Water parks will all be shut down by then. October is also peak season for Fall fairs, and most of them come with amusement rides, so even if you can't get to a park, you should be able to find yourself a fair to attend somewhere during your stay.

The thing with New England in October is that it is leaf peeping season. There will be tons of tourists throughout the region for that reason alone, and New England encompasses five states that are all different, so it would help to narrow down what you really want out of your stay ---- a more rural Vermont experience, a small town experience, a city experience, etc. You'll find no shortage of things to do no matter where in New England you go in October. It's one of New England's big tourist months.
posted by zizzle at 6:35 AM on May 24, 2011 [1 favorite]


The Peabody Essex Museum is great! But Salem in October is overrun by Haunted Happenings.

If you like rollercoasters and such, Six Flags New England is about two hours west of Boston, and is open on weekends until Halloween.
posted by mkb at 6:48 AM on May 24, 2011


October is probably going to be a little chilly and rain is fairly likely, but it can also be gorgeously sunny and crisp. Plan on light jackets.

As for what to do, I'd like to put in a vote for Western Mass. The drive along Route 2 from Boston to the Berkshires in October in full fall foliage season is one of the most beautiful things I've ever seen. It's about three hours, and an easy five hours to Montreal up through Vermont and more lovely scenery.
posted by MadamM at 6:49 AM on May 24, 2011 [2 favorites]


Take Amtrak (it's the only intercity rail in the US that isn't completely horrible, unlike EU where rail is pretty decent) from Boston to New York. No car needed and it's New York!
posted by Brian Puccio at 6:54 AM on May 24, 2011


1) What will the weather be like? We live in England, so are used to cold and rain, but not sure we want to spend our whole honeymoon sliding along a snow-covered road, is driving likely to be a problem? I'm a confident driver, and I've driven in Florida, but I've not got much experience of driving in "winter" weather, just a few snowy days here.

Days will be anywhere from the low 80s to high 50s, nights in the 40s or 50s. The daytime weather varies that month more than any other time of year. Snow is not absolutely undocumented, but it's very rare everywhere except very high elevations in New Hampshire and Vermont ("very rare" as in "I think I remember a little snowfall once near Halloween when I was a kid"). Don't worry about it.

2) We both like museums, nice villages, lazy lunches and aren't too concerned about nightlife (although an evening drink in a nice pub/bar never gets turned down!). We're also a fan of theme parks. Are these kind of things going to be open? I know if you went to English seaside resorts in October you wouldn't find much open.

You'll get a ton of suggestions. The one I always recommend is Boston's Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, which is fairly unique for a major museum. It used to be some rich eccentric's huge house and her personal art collection was staggering.

3) I'd love to get out and explore a bit, but equally, I don't want our holiday to become 12 hours a day in the car. What is a sensible itinerary to see lots, but without racing around?
I'm overwhelmed by the amount of recommendations on Google, and some of them to me look a bit packed. After using Google Maps to plan some long-distance routes around Europe, I'm also a bit sceptical of their times and wouldn't want to use just that to make my decisions.


Really open-ended question. Outside of the northern two thirds of Maine (which you can safely skip) and the northern halves of New Hampshire and Vermont (which do have some charms) nothing is really more than a three hour drive from Boston. In two hours you can be in Portland, Maine or central New Hampshire or Western Massachusetts. Figure out what you want to see (foliage in Maine/New Hampshire/Vermont, seacost, historical sights, etc) and know that everything's pretty accessible.

4) Is it possible to get into/out of Canada? We'd love to see Montreal, but I don't know how the border "works" with an English couple on tourist visa? Is it a sensible drive?

The border folks will abide by the same controls that you would expect if you flew in. Your UK passport allows you entry to the US and Canada. Some customs agents are dicks and some are awesome, so you might get red tape and bruskness or you might get a pleasant chat. But nothing soul crushing. I crossed the border with two European nationals when I was in college 15 years ago and it was fine. Camp counselors I worked with from all over (including the UK) regularly traveled to Canada by car at the end of the summer (again, 15 years ago). They're stricter now, but I don't think you'll regret doing it. Montreal is a 6-hour, straightforward drive from Boston and is as fantastic a city as you've heard. I'd do it.

5) I'd love to checkout an NHL game if possible, when is the schedule announced and how easy is it to get tickets for the Bruins? I know someone on holiday in England would really struggle to get tickets for most Premier League Football games.

Bruins tickets have generally been available day-of-game for the past many seasons. Certain games sell out (rival opponents like the Canadiens, etc) most don't. You should be able to get tickets at some point during your stay. Disclaimer: They're having a rather successful playoff run as I write this (knock wood) and interest may be higher next year. But I still think it won't be a problem.
posted by Mayor Curley at 6:55 AM on May 24, 2011


You can definitely get to Montreal. I went there with my girlfriend on a holiday (She is British) and we drove through the border crossing in VT. There were no problems at all at the border, but we possibly got asked a few more questions than normal. It is possible that everyone gets asked a few more questions now thought since before that trip the last time I crossed the border was in 1999.
posted by koolkat at 7:00 AM on May 24, 2011


If you decide to head out to Western Mass (where you will definitely be encountering a lot of leaf peepers) Six Flags New England amusement park is open with a limited schedule (mostly weekends) in October their info & calendar page is here. It's about an hour and a half drive from Boston, depending on the traffic.

For Boston museums, I would second the recommendation for the Isabella Stewart Gardner house. It's quite eclectic and I know some people who prefer more formal museums and don't really enjoy just roaming around the house, but I find it fascinating.

I'm in Western Mass, so if you're thinking of heading this way and are looking for info, feel free to Memail.
posted by camyram at 7:32 AM on May 24, 2011


NHL game tickets are very doable. Stubhub.com is your friend here.
posted by JohnnyGunn at 7:42 AM on May 24, 2011


Ah, camyram beat me to mentioning Six Flags!

As far as "nice villages" go, you might be interested in visiting some of the towns north of Boston - for instance Rockport or Newburyport. Very charming and only an hour or so drive (or commuter train) from Boston.
posted by mskyle at 7:43 AM on May 24, 2011


I was in Boston in December and stayed at the Lenox hotel (http://www.lenoxhotel.com/) - I'd highly recommend it. Very nice old place with friendly staff in Back bay, but about 15 mins walk from downtown.

I'm irish and went to Montreal afterwards to visit a friend and there are no border issues - at least going in. I flew back to the UK from Montreal, so no idea about returning to the US.
posted by DamPots at 7:46 AM on May 24, 2011


If you want Bruins tickets, you can probably get some from stubhub.com if you have trouble getting them from the box office. However, the NHL season starts at the beginning of October and there are usually only a few pre-season games so if your honeymoon is, say, the first weekend of October, you might be a few days too early.

I would discourage driving in Boston. The roads are narrow, parking is minimal, traffic nightmarish, other drivers Massholes.

I've never been but I've heard Montreal is lovely. I'm a US citizen but I've crossed the border at Niagara Falls countless times (years ago though) and have never had an issue.

If you want some sample itineraries, I'd check out NYTimes.com. They have a whole series of "72 Hours in Wherever" and I'm sure they've done Boston.

The thing is that Boston is also very neighborhood friendly so if it's not raining, I would plan on spending some time just walking around and enjoying the scenery. Walk across the bridges, through the parks, etc.

I don't know if it's still there but I remember a jazz club at the top of the Prudential Building called Top of the Hub. Amazing view of the whole city.
posted by kat518 at 7:48 AM on May 24, 2011


October is my favorite time of year - even when it's rainy, the clouds are billowy and blustery and the wind scatters the brightly colored leaves everywhere. When it's sunny, it's amazing.

Hockey - Minor League and College games are likely to be more fun than pro hockey. You have hockey enthusiasts and families, rather than Super Sports Fans, who can be obnoxious at times, and tickets and concessions are notably cheaper. In Boston itself, you can catch a good game at Boston College, Boston University, Harvard or Northeastern University.

Quaint New England Towns - Salem is a lot of fun in October. The unfortunate colonial Witch Trials have had the modern effect of attracting wiccans, spiritualists, new-agers, goths and all manner of strange and interesting people to the town.
posted by Slap*Happy at 7:53 AM on May 24, 2011


Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket are both lovely in October and the ocean is still warm enough for swimming.
posted by mareli at 7:53 AM on May 24, 2011


Lots of museums in Boston and Cambridge - art, natural history, all kinds of stuff. Those are all easily accessible without a car (and more difficult to reach with a a car).

There's a nice little museum in Lincoln, MA called the DeCordova. Lots of outdoor sculpture in a nice setting, and if your timing is good, the foliage will add a lot to the experience. Walden Pond is nearby, if you like Thoreau. There's a train from Boston, but it's a pretty long walk to either place from the train stations.

There's a museum complex in Lowell, MA dedicated to the long-ago textile industry. It is somewhat closer to a train station. Once you're there, there are trolleys to take you from the HQ to the mill. There are also boat rides on the canals that show off the locks and such.

There is an indoor water park that's open all year. It says "Boston," but it's in Danvers, and you need a car to get to it.

Don't worry about snow, but, be aware that driving on wet leaves is just like driving on ice.
posted by Kirth Gerson at 8:16 AM on May 24, 2011


My honeymoon trip (in 1998) started in Boston, then to Maine, Quebec City, then back to Boston by way of New Hampshire. We started on Oct. 10 and came back at the end of the month. The weather was fine most of the time. In Boston, thirding the Isabella gardener museum, and I really enjoyed the State Walk through the city (don't know if an Englishman would enjoy it quite as much!). From Boston, we drove up to Deer Isle, Maine and stayed at the Pilgrim's Inn. different owners now, but it's probably still nice. We love the villages on Deer Isle...Blue Hill, Castine, Deer Isle, Stonington. (sorry, can't put links in. I'm on a slow network at the airport.)

after Deer Isle, we spent two days in Bar Harbor...had a great time riding around the island on rented bicycles. It was maybe a three hour drive from there to Quebec City with border problems at all.

MeMail me if you'd like more details, but suffice it to say that it was one of my top 5 vacations. Congratulations and enjoy.
posted by Gusaroo at 8:39 AM on May 24, 2011


1) What will the weather be like?

October can be the most beautiful time of year. You can get unlucky and hit a week of cloud cover, particularly in northern New England (VT, NH, inland ME), but with a fortnight planned you are virtually guaranteed some gorgeous days. Overall, I think you'll be delighted with the timing.

2) We both like museums, nice villages, lazy lunches and aren't too concerned about nightlife (although an evening drink in a nice pub/bar never gets turned down!). We're also a fan of theme parks. Are these kind of things going to be open?

October is tourism season, so things will be open.

3) I'd love to get out and explore a bit, but equally, I don't want our holiday to become 12 hours a day in the car. What is a sensible itinerary to see lots, but without racing around?

Maine is the only place you can go that will end up being a ton of driving, and only then if you go way inland or up the coast. Boston to Montreal is a comfortable six hours, and less if you push things and get lucky at the border. Pretty much anywhere in between or within an hour or two off that path will be scenic and delightful. Stay southwest of the direct route for more towns and villages, more northeast for wild and wilderness.

4) Is it possible to get into/out of Canada? We'd love to see Montreal, but I don't know how the border "works" with an English couple on tourist visa? Is it a sensible drive?

Yes, and recommended.

5) I'd love to checkout an NHL game if possible, when is the schedule announced and how easy is it to get tickets for the Bruins? I know someone on holiday in England would really struggle to get tickets for most Premier League Football games.

Good taste in sports! Early season NHL game tickets are usually obtainable even in the hot markets. One small advantage of the overly long season. If you head to Montreal, consider going to a Canadiens game. Those tickets may be a bit harder to get, but it would be even more the experience.

6) Are there any MeFi meetups planned?!

There is time to plan some! My wife and I live right in Montpelier, VT, which is halfway on your road trip from Boston to Montreal, a great little New England town itself, and home to several great restaurants. I'm always up for meeting any mefites on their way through town, so drop a line if you head this way.
posted by meinvt at 9:06 AM on May 24, 2011


Weather changes a lot in October: wet and cold, or suddenly sunny. It's probably not unlike your weather then: wear several light layers and be ready to remove or add them throughout the day.

Driving up to Vermont or New Hampshire might be nice, but central- or western Massachusetts is pretty enough without driving through the mountains. (If you *like* mountain driving, go up to New Hampshire -- a few hours drive -- and do to the top of Mount Washington.) The North Shore around Boston is also pretty.

EVERYONE there says "Mass." to mean "Massachusetts," and they say "Ave." for "Avenue." When driving, they will also use Dunkin Donuts stores as a landmark. Beware: every Dunkin Donuts is located within sight of at least two more stores, and they make terrible, terrible navigational aids. If you rent a car, get one with a GPS.
posted by wenestvedt at 10:00 AM on May 24, 2011


The Mt. Washington Auto Road closes for the season in mid-to-late October. If you do go up there, bring some cold-weather clothes. Kancamagus Highway is very scenic, and open when you're there. You will have lots of company.
posted by Kirth Gerson at 10:16 AM on May 24, 2011


I forgot - you can still get to the top of Mt. Washington after the Auto Road closes, by taking the Cog Railway up.I do not believe the coaches are heated, and Mt. Washington is notorious for extreme weather, so don't forget that warm clothing.
posted by Kirth Gerson at 10:24 AM on May 24, 2011


Plan your hotels/motels way ahead. October is leaf peeping season and the hotels in NH, ME and Vt fill fast. Spekeing from experience on my honeymoon we went north and the only room we could find was a dank basement room usually reserved for truckers.
posted by Gungho at 11:11 AM on May 24, 2011


As priorities, I would recommend that you spend some time in Gloucester/Rockport MA, Portsmouth, NH and Portland, ME. I live in Newburyport and think you could safely skip it, because everything it offers is also available in Portsmouth, which is only 20 minutes further on, and Portsmouth is a much more interesting town in which to pass the time.

I would recommend that you drive from Boston to Portsmouth on, say a Saturday morning if you can, because on Saturday morning from 8 AM -1 PM you can catch the Portsmouth farmer's market. There are wonderful sandwiches and baked goods to picnic on, crafts and arts to view, and sociable atmosphere. The town itself is full of art galleries, vintage stores, record stores, a history museum, parks like Prescott Park which might be hosting their Chili Fest when you visit, and dozens of great restaurants and cafes. The Portsmouth Brewery is known far and wide for their good quality beers made on site, and the Press Room has live music seven nights a week and some afternoons. You can pass a great afternoon and evening here, stay somewhere downtown like the Ale House Inn, and then in the morning wend your way up the coast to Portland. Stop for a walk at the strikingly scenic Fort Foster in Kittery, ME, and continue up 103 to York, Maine, where you can have a walk on a lovely beach and a lunch at fancy schmancy but lovely Blue Sky, and then drive by the Nubble Light for pictures.

From there, continue on to Portland where you can easily spend a lovely couple of days. The Portland Museum of Art is great, especially the Maine galleries, and from the museum you can wander through the 'arts district' area and into the Old Port, a walkable shopping/dining district. Portland has some incredible food and is known for its local/seasonal/artisanal etc food scene, and special recommendations include Fore Street, 555, Street & Co, Duckfat, and Standard Baking Co. Plenty of good pubs for that late afternoon beer here, too. I like Gritty McDuff's or the Great Lost Bear. Incidentally, both of these pubs have been home to MeFi meetups - so if you are planning meetups, Portland is a great place to have one too!

Gloucester and Rockport, MA, are also worth looking up and can easily be done as a daytrip from Boston or on your way slowly northward. October is a truly excellent time to travel and the weather can be beautiful.

There's much to do, and do read bulletin boards for news on seasonal events, because that time of year every town has something happening - pumpkin fest, fall fest, apple picking, etc etc. You should have a lovely time.
posted by Miko at 1:46 PM on May 24, 2011 [1 favorite]


Yes, New England will likely be lovely in October. Lots of great ideas above.

A note about going to Canada: crossing the border should be absolutely fine, but definitely check with your rental car company before taking a rental vehicle from one country to the other.
posted by bassjump at 7:29 PM on May 24, 2011


Thanks all, loads of great ideas in here. The weather sounds great to us and all your enthusiasm has got us really excited!

Gungho has already answered my next question, I wasn't sure weather to plan fully and book hotels ahead of time, or if we'd be able to "wing" it. I guess I should get planning.

A key decision for us is weather we stay in one hotel most of the time and go out to places for a day, or if we tour around. I'm leaning towards the second, as it seems to make more sense than driving out and back every day.

The NHL schedule doesn't seem to be announced until mid June/July, so I guess if it fits in great, if not I'll definately try to find an AHL/College game.

At the moment I'm thinking:

Get a hire-car from the airport and keep it the whole time (Making sure they're ok with me taking it to Canada). I don't really want to have to mess about picking up/dropping off multiple cars.

5 nights in Boston (Should we stay centrally or on the outskirts and get the train in?)
4 days in Boston, museums, chilling out etc (Definitely checking out the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum)
A day at Six Flags New England
A night in Brattleboro, VM
3 nights in Montreal (Again, should we stay central or stay out?)
2 nights in Portsmouth, NH
A night in Portland, ME
A night in Bangor, ME
A night in Salam, MA

Spend the morning in Salam before flying home

The days will get fleshed out with all of your ideas!

Does this all sound sensible?

Recommendations for hotels would be brilliant.
posted by chrispy108 at 10:28 AM on May 25, 2011


Just a few comments on your itinerary:
I think you could get away with four nights in Boston
Six Flags is likely to only be open on weekends in October
If your night in Brattleboro is right after Six Flags, you might want to head up a little more north to split up the driving more evenly. Perhaps visit Quechee Gorge and stay around there? It's leaf peeping season, and that's a good area for it.
Montreal! I love it... highly recommend staying central.
Montreal to Portsmouth is quite a drive, but it should be on relatively traffic-free roads.
I'd recommend adding another night in Portland, ME and skip Bangor.
posted by smalls at 3:58 PM on May 25, 2011


So I'm looking at your schedule a little bit more. This is a lot of driving. What about taking a train from Boston to Montreal and back. You really won't miss having a car in either of these cities, and it could actually be quite an inconvenience (Boston parking can easily run $24+ per day).

After you return to Boston, you can do the Maine/New Hampshire loop or a Western MA/Vermont loop. I also recommend covering slightly less distance in the car, which becomes more possible through the train journey. I really think you might miss out on some great little New England spots if you spend so much time on the road.

If you can find a rental company that allows drop off in another city, you can actually do the train from Montreal to a third city (Portland?) and pick up the car there.
posted by smalls at 4:12 PM on May 25, 2011


I agree that Bangor is not really worth including.

But do look at how much time the train will take to Montreal. I think the schedule is pretty rare and sometimes a ticket will route you through New York, which is a huge waste of time. But a plus to the train might be that you could stop in Burlington, VT for a day or two.

If I were doing this trip, I think I'd spend the 4 nights in Boston, then go to Montreal, perhaps by way of WEstern MA and Burlington on the drive up with a stop overnight in one of those places. Then I'd wind my way back down in a leisurely way, through Montpelier maybe, Keene NH maybe, to Portsmouth NH, up to Portland for a jaunt, then back down into MA and maybe a little Cape Cod if you have time left over, and back to Boston. Taking back roads here and there, especially in VT and NH, and stopping frequently. I think being in the car for a long time isn't really such a negative in New England, because you can stop at so many places so frequently and make your roadside pit-stops be really interesting spots.
posted by Miko at 5:22 PM on May 25, 2011 [1 favorite]


I'm from Maine, and I don't think that you should go to Bangor. It's just not worth it-- you'll end up four and a half hours from Salem and (I'm trying to be delicate so read this as understatement) there's nothing remarkable about the place and there's nothing to do except eat at a chain restaurant.

You'd be better off headed directly from Portland to Salem and staying an extra night there. You can go to the Peabody Essex Museum (which as folks have mentioned is pretty special-- we used to have a membership and love it) or drive out to Marblehead or Newburyport or Rockport. Even another night in Portland is a better idea than driving two hours to Bangor (in my head that was "goddamn Bangor") and then driving four and a half hours back to Greater Boston.

I would try to stay at the Hawthorne Hotel in Salem, which is historic and absolutely lovely. It's a half-hour from my house and we've actually done a getaway night there just for fun.

As for Boston, I would try to stay in the city center, specifically the Financial District, to get the full effect. That will put you within walking distance of most everything in Boston Proper and easy T access to everything else.
posted by Mayor Curley at 2:23 AM on May 26, 2011 [1 favorite]


Well if you want to drive to Bangor you really should go to Bar Harbor and Acadia Park instead.
posted by Gungho at 8:35 AM on May 26, 2011 [1 favorite]


Thanks again for the help!

We're now thinking of cutting out Six Flags (It's easy enough for us to go to theme parks any time at home, but we cannot drive through New England here!), unless it is an amazing must see park?

We'll also miss out Bangor as recommended.

I definitely want to have a car, I'm not a big fan of trains, and for us the appeal of stopping at interesting little places here and there as Miko recommends.

How does this sound?

4 nights in Boston (Staying in the Financial District)
4 days in Boston, museums, chilling out etc (Definitely checking out the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum)
A night in Quechee Gorge, VM
3 nights in Montreal (Staying centrally)
A night in Montpelier, NH
A night in Portsmouth, NH
A night in Portland, ME
2 nights in Salam, MA

I'm going to sit down over the weekend and take a look at loads of hotels. Unfortunately the Hawthorne Hotel in Salem looks to be full already :(
posted by chrispy108 at 5:19 AM on May 27, 2011


Good call. There's nothing really special about Six Flags. I would have recommended a couple of the more old-timey regional amusement parks, like Lake Compounce and Canobie Lake, but at this time of year I just don't think they'd be that much fun. All have a lot of water rides which you are not going to want to do in the crisp October air, and at the end of the day they are amusement parks like anywhere else.

That itinerary sounds great. There will be a lot of intriguing little spots along the way. Check out the forums at Roadfood for suggestions of places to stop for unique treats and food experiences, Local Harvest for apple and pumpkin-picking type farms which often have fun things going on that time of year, Roadside America for quirky attractions and sights, and Yankee Magazine's site for travel tips, events, suggested scenic drives, etc. Yankee is actually a treasure trove for good New England travel information - if your libraries over there get it (kind of doubtful I guess?) it's worth checking out past autumn issues for their recommendations. They tend to put out seasonal travel guides covering a lot of the kind of thing you're looking for. Also, their website contains a lot of that same content.
posted by Miko at 7:21 AM on May 27, 2011


You might consider staying a night or two in Bed & Breakfasts. I have stayed in this one, which is not all that far from Queechee Gorge. The owners are native Vermonters (her grandfather built the house). Very scenic location.
posted by Kirth Gerson at 7:21 AM on May 27, 2011


Check out Yankee's Foliage section for sure.
posted by Miko at 7:22 AM on May 27, 2011


Also, Montpelier is VT - you probably would have caught that error in planning anyway but just wanted to mention so you don't start off with the wrong information!
posted by Miko at 7:23 AM on May 27, 2011


That looks manageable and really fun-- just about perfect. I'm very excited for you!
posted by Mayor Curley at 7:35 AM on May 27, 2011


Just came across this in my favourites.

Our honeymoon was absolutely amazing, we saw so much great stuff and met some great people.

If anyone stumbles across this post thinking of doing similar please do drop me a mefi mail, I'm so happy telling anyone who'll listen about what we did!
posted by chrispy108 at 2:57 PM on February 4, 2012 [1 favorite]


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