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It must ring loudly and proudly.
May 20, 2011 12:56 PM   Subscribe

I need a external telephone ringer that is similar to the Doro Ring Plus Teleflash that will work in the US on a VoIP telephone. Specific product details inside.

This is for work. We need to find a product that operates like the Doro Ring Plus Teleflash. Basically what we need is an external ringer that is loud that will work on a VoIP phone. Most external ringers that we have found will only work via an RJ-11 (telephone line) passthrough which doesn't work for VoIP phones as there is no analog line to run through. The Doro Ring Plus runs the risk of not working as it is designed for 230V 50Hz with a European-style plug. Worse yet, it's is not available in the US, and most UK dealers aren't willing to ship it.

The big feature that we want from this is that this ringer has a small microphone/sensor that detects when the phone is ringing as opposed to using the ring voltage coming down an analog telephone line. This is the really essential part for connecting a loud external ringer to a VoIP phone.

Our Google-fu is failing us bigtime on this one. Any suggestions on getting an external ringer to work with a true VoIP phone that don't involve tearing open the phone itself would be awesome! Thanks MeFis.

Due to business concerns I cannot list the make or model of phone we need the external ringer to work with. Assume the phone is a VoIP phone with standard Cat 5 RJ-45 connections and does not use analog service directly. The phone is a deskset that has two RJ-9 connections, one for the handset and one for a headset. Neither of those connections do anything when the phone rings. The ringing comes out of the speakerphone's speaker. We are aware that we can tear apart the phone and connect an external ringer to the speakerphone, however, that is not the solution we are looking for. Hell, if the Doro Ring Plus device will work on 110-120V 60Hz, does anyone know where we can get one?
posted by Mister Fabulous to Technology (7 answers total) 1 user marked this as a favorite
 
An Arduino could be rigged with a microphone you'd place on the VoIP ringer to detect it and could easily trigger flashers or louder speakers.
posted by odinsdream at 1:17 PM on May 20, 2011


It's a hack, but you can set up an ATA on the same dial number to connect to the RJ-11 of an external ringer.
posted by Runes at 1:25 PM on May 20, 2011


Most business-class SIP / IP-PBX phone systems have provisions for providing a standard analog jack, either piggybacked off one of the phones, or as its own extension. That's basically how we got our fax on our Panasonic IP-PBX. Could you not do this, and program that extension to ring on all desired incoming lines? Then you ought to be use any off-the-shelf external ringer.
posted by xedrik at 1:56 PM on May 20, 2011


It's a hack, but you can set up an ATA on the same dial number to connect to the RJ-11 of an external ringer.

Most business-class SIP / IP-PBX phone systems have provisions for providing a standard analog jack, either piggybacked off one of the phones, or as its own extension. That's basically how we got our fax on our Panasonic IP-PBX. Could you not do this, and program that extension to ring on all desired incoming lines? Then you ought to be use any off-the-shelf external ringer.


We're aware of using an ATA and that's normally our suggestion. The issue is the system has a limit to the number of analog ports and the sale we are trying to work around requires more ringers than ATA ports available.
posted by Mister Fabulous at 2:05 PM on May 20, 2011


I'm not sure I understand how you're limited on the number of ATA ports? It's just another VoIP instrument. I don't mean FXO ports, but a standalone ATA like a Cisco ATA 187. To your PBX it'll just appear as another phone which you set up to simulring with the target phone numbers. For purposes of trunk consumption its a no-op as it'll never be used for dialing out or in.
posted by Runes at 3:05 PM on May 21, 2011


I'm not sure I understand how you're limited on the number of ATA ports? It's just another VoIP instrument.

Due to business reasons, I can't go into detail on this other than two magical words: proprietary software. If I could have dropped in an ATA I would have and wouldn't be posting.

In this situation, a sensor-based external ringer is exactly what we need. This one in particular is the only one we found to do exactly what we need. And hell, it has good reviews. The problem is getting it imported, which hasn't proven to be easy.
posted by Mister Fabulous at 1:25 AM on May 22, 2011


Can you put in a SIP ringer, like this from Algo?

Plantronics makes a couple of audio-based ring sensors for their headsets that could probably be hacked to support what you're doing. They're designed to address the problem of how to engage the remote headset when the phone rings. Take a look at the pop-up directions for the HL-10 or the detailed description for the RD-1. You could either take the output from one of these into a device to actuate the light flasher of your choice (as suggested above, arduino could be your friend here) or use the lifter to actuate a device. Come to think of it, I think just about every headset manufacturer has some variant of these, since they're essentially add-ons to an existing phone system.
posted by Runes at 7:09 AM on May 22, 2011


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