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Do all fouls by defenders in the box result in penalties?
October 30, 2010 11:33 AM   Subscribe

In association football (soccer), if a player commits a foul inside his own penalty box, does it always result in a penalty kick being awarded to the other team?
posted by WalterMitty to Sports, Hobbies, & Recreation (9 answers total) 1 user marked this as a favorite
 
yes unless it's a trivial offense, like a goalie picking up the ball when he's not allowed. in that case you get a two person penalty kick, in which the ball cant be aimed directly at the goal, but must be touched twice before entering.
posted by 3mendo at 11:44 AM on October 30, 2010


The foul would only result in a penalty kick in circumstances where, should that foul have occurred outside the penalty area, it would be punishable by a direct free kick. Otherwise the referee will award an indirect free kick in the penalty area.
posted by essexjan at 11:57 AM on October 30, 2010 [1 favorite]


3mendo is basically right (the 'two person penalty kick' is called an indirect free kick: the kicker cannot score directly from the kick). Here's an example.

The example 3mendo gives is the most common one: the goalkeeper is not allowed to handle the ball if it has been passed back to him by one of his teammates. But every so often, this happens.
posted by Infinite Jest at 11:57 AM on October 30, 2010


Law 14
A penalty kick is awarded against a team which commits one of the ten offences for which a direct free kick is awarded, inside its own penalty area and while the ball is in play.
Law 13
A direct free kick is awarded to the opposing team if a player commits any of the following six offences in a manner considered by the referee to be careless, reckless or using excessive force:
  • kicks or attempts to kick an opponent
  • trips or attempts to trip an opponent
  • jumps at an opponent
  • charges an opponent
  • strikes or attempts to strike an opponent
  • pushes an opponent
A direct free kick is also awarded to the opposing team if a player commits any of the following four offences:
  • tackles an opponent to gain possession of the ball, making contact with the opponent before touching the ball
  • holds an opponent
  • spits at an opponent
  • handles the ball deliberately (except for the goalkeeper within his own penalty area)
posted by caek at 12:07 PM on October 30, 2010 [1 favorite]


And here are the indirect free kick offences, none of which result in a penalty if they happen in the pentalty area.
An indirect free kick is awarded to the opposing team if a goalkeeper, inside his own penalty area, commits any of the following five offences:
  • takes more than six seconds while controlling the ball with his hands before releasing it from his possession
  • touches the ball again with his hands after it has been released from his possession and has not touched any other player
  • touches the ball with his hands after it has been deliberately kicked to him by a team-mate
  • touches the ball with his hands after he has received it directly from a throw-in taken by a team-mate
An indirect free kick is also awarded to the opposing team if a player, in the opinion of the referee:
  • plays in a dangerous manner
  • impedes the progress of an opponent
  • prevents the goalkeeper from releasing the ball from his hands
  • commits any other offence, not previously mentioned in Law 12, for which play is stopped to caution or dismiss a player
The indirect free kick is taken from where the offence occurred.
posted by caek at 12:12 PM on October 30, 2010 [2 favorites]


does it always result in a penalty kick being awarded to the other team?

Not if the ref doesn't notice it.
posted by Chocolate Pickle at 4:00 PM on October 30, 2010


The indirect free kick is taken from where the offence occurred.

Unless it occurs inside the six-yard box, in which case the ball is moved out to the six-yard box and spotted nearest where the infraction took place. And then, as in the linked video, all the defensive players are permitted to line up on the goal line.

As soon as the first touch is taken on an IFK, the defenders can rush the ball. It's mayhem! (And a fun call to make, if you're a ref.)
posted by stargell at 9:11 PM on October 30, 2010


[Gomes] It depends if Mark Clattenburg is on the pitch. [/Gomes]
posted by fullerine at 9:34 PM on October 30, 2010


Which all makes for an interesting and often controversial dynamic where referees sometimes tend to let things go in the event of a foul that might have been called elsewhere on the pitch because some fouls, subjectively, don't warrant completely changing the game.
posted by doublehappy at 1:21 AM on October 31, 2010


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