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Which goes on my resume, the last day I worked, or the last day I was paid for?
March 15, 2010 12:43 PM   Subscribe

I was laid off in December, but my last day was in November. Which do I put on my resume?

I was laid off late last year. November 20th I was given the news and cleaned out my desk. However, as reflected on the letter they gave me, I was actually on 'administrative leave' for the next two weeks, and was officially "furloughed" on December 4.

I realized today that I have different dates on different versions of my resume---one says "May 2008 to November 2009"; the other says "May 2008 — December 2009". Obviously, I need to pick one, but which? The date after which I stopped being paid and receiving benefits, or the date on which I turned in my keycard and was escorted from the building and after which I was available for new work?
posted by FlyingMonkey to Work & Money (5 answers total) 1 user marked this as a favorite
 
say december. it will be correct when they call the business to verify and it makes your time unemployed shorter on the resume.
posted by nadawi at 12:45 PM on March 15, 2010 [1 favorite]


Agree with nadawi. If your concern is that December seems like a lie since your last day was in November, I think you are in the clear here, considering their records should indicate Dec 4th was your "last day."
posted by CharlieSue at 12:52 PM on March 15, 2010


December.

(This sort of thing is sometimes negotiated as a professional courtesy with senior management who leave by "mutual agreement" so that they can search for a job without it looking like they are out of work.)
posted by desuetude at 1:15 PM on March 15, 2010


December is perfectly appropriate here. Thirded.
posted by davejay at 1:15 PM on March 15, 2010


Well, I guess it's unanimous. Thanks, all.
posted by FlyingMonkey at 1:54 PM on March 15, 2010


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