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"What's done is done." in Latin?
February 12, 2010 7:43 PM   Subscribe

How would "What's done is done." be translated into Latin?
posted by comwiz to Writing & Language (11 answers total)
 
factum est quod factum est
posted by francesca too at 8:10 PM on February 12, 2010


Jacta est.

Literally, "It is thrown", referring to dice. It is what Julius Caesar said after crossing the Rubicon, an act of aggression towards the Senate that could not be reversed. Nonetheless, it is the most apt, if not most literal, translation, IMO.
posted by IAmBroom at 8:14 PM on February 12, 2010 [11 favorites]


If you're doing this for a tattoo, you should read this comment from a while back.
posted by dunkadunc at 8:14 PM on February 12, 2010 [2 favorites]


Alea iacta est
posted by Bigfoot Mandala at 8:24 PM on February 12, 2010 [4 favorites]


See also.
posted by Madamina at 9:25 PM on February 12, 2010 [2 favorites]


'Quod factum, factum est', or simply 'quod factum factum'.
posted by verstegan at 1:27 AM on February 13, 2010


"Quod vides fecisse, factum ducas"

Literally: "What you see has been done, consider it done", or more naturally: "What's done is done".

It's a take on Line 2 of Catullus' Carmen VIII:-
"Miser Catulle, desinas ineptire
Et quod vides perisse, perditum ducas.
..."

"Poor old Catullus, stop your whining
What you see is over, accept it's really over.
..."

... after he'd been dumped by yet another girl. One of his best poems.
posted by genesta at 3:21 AM on February 13, 2010 [3 favorites]


If the focus is on your actions you could go with: quod scripsi scripsi.

Basically Pilatus is saying he's not changing his actions: what I've written is written.
posted by ersatz at 7:29 AM on February 13, 2010


ersatz, I'd say that specifically avoids "actions" - it's about writing. "The moving hand writes, and having written, moves on..." ... and all that.
posted by IAmBroom at 12:29 PM on February 13, 2010


On review, I'd go with Bigfoot Mandala better-remembered version,
Alea iacta est
posted by IAmBroom at 12:35 PM on February 13, 2010


Oh, and: "i" and "j" are interchangeable in Latin scripts.
"alea jacta est" = "alea iacta est"
posted by IAmBroom at 4:43 PM on February 13, 2010


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