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legally dropping out of school, in MN
January 20, 2010 12:55 PM   Subscribe

Can a Minnesota student who is 17 legally drop out of school with parental consent if they are in special education? What if they are 19 and still in school? Where is this referenced in MN law? (Asking for Mrs. Pithy Comment.)
posted by pithy comment to Education (3 answers total)
 
(Also, this is related to a professional situation, not our own, as-yet-existent child.)
posted by pithy comment at 1:01 PM on January 20, 2010


From 120A.22, 2009 Minnesota Statutes:
Subd. 8.Withdrawal from school. Any student between 16 and 18 years old who seeks to withdraw from school, and the student's parent or guardian must:
(1) attend a meeting with school personnel to discuss the educational opportunities available to the student, including alternative educational opportunities; and

(2) sign a written election to withdraw from school.



While the law requires the state to offer special education services past the age of 18, there is no indication anywhere in the statute I looked at that special education students are treated any differently w/r/t compulsory education requirements. The compulsory ages in MN are 7-16 (Subd. 5. Ages and terms. Every child between seven
and 16 years of age shall receive instruction.
). So yes, any child over the age of 16 can drop out with parental consent, even if they're in special education.
posted by katemonster at 1:04 PM on January 20, 2010


From the same link that katemonster posts:

In sections 125A.03 to 125A.24 and 125A.65, "parent" means a parent, guardian, or other person having legal custody of a child under age 18. For an unmarried pupil age 18 or over, "parent" means the pupil unless a guardian or conservator has been appointed, in which case it means the guardian or conservator.
posted by cabingirl at 1:14 PM on January 20, 2010


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