Colleges in NYC that are reasonably priced?
December 26, 2009 11:16 AM   Subscribe

Colleges in NYC that are reasonably priced?

I'm looking at studying in New York City, I'm 26 and have never stepped foot in a college class room before. I'm moving there no matter what and will be working, but I'd like to start pursuing a bachelors degree on the side.

Anyone have recommendations of good schools, preferably in Manhattan or Brooklyn that aren't super expensive? I'll be probably studying Film History, or literature.
posted by mattsweaters to Education (14 answers total) 1 user marked this as a favorite
 
Any of the CUNY colleges are dirt cheap for city residents, although you may want to look at how long you have to live there to get the in-city tuition rates. Good luck!
posted by deadmessenger at 11:23 AM on December 26, 2009


My first thought, as a non-NYC resident, is to look at CUNY.
posted by mdonley at 11:25 AM on December 26, 2009


Yes, I looked at CUNY - it looks likes a good fit. Hopefully some New Yorkers can give give me their opinion of them!
posted by mattsweaters at 11:33 AM on December 26, 2009


Hmm. CUNY would be my choice too, but the resident tuition is a lot cheaper. So check out the requirements for that. Also remember that they are a giant, crazy bureaucracy!

A good thing about CUNY is that you only have to do one application for all of the schools.

Do you think you might get lots of federal grants?

File your FAFSA as soon as possible. You can fill it out now, you don't have to wait until you file your taxes.
posted by kathrineg at 11:35 AM on December 26, 2009


I was coming here also to suggest CUNY.

File your FAFSA as soon as possible. You can fill it out now, you don't have to wait until you file your taxes.
This is only true if you want to attend before June 2010. For the 2010-2011 school year, you can't start filling it out until after Jan. 1, 2010.
posted by ishotjr at 11:38 AM on December 26, 2009


CUNY is composed of several different schools. The reputations of the individual schools varies. Macaulay Honors College is something to look into.

My choice would be Hunter...unless you want to do business (which you don't) in which case I would go for Baruch. Or if you want to do criminal justice, you can check out John Jay.

Don't rule out the private schools, because they might be able to give you enough aid to be worth it...I guess you'd have to ask the individual schools' financial aid offices.
posted by kathrineg at 11:44 AM on December 26, 2009


This is only true if you want to attend before June 2010. For the 2010-2011 school year, you can't start filling it out until after Jan. 1, 2010.
Indeed. My point was more that you shouldn't wait until April unless you have a pressing reason to do so. The earlier, the better.
posted by kathrineg at 11:45 AM on December 26, 2009


Inexpensive doesn't really exist in Manhattan. That said, CUNY is less expensive than NYU or Columbia.
posted by dfriedman at 11:46 AM on December 26, 2009


You will really need to establish residency for any of the CUNY schools to be considered "cheap". I transfered into a CUNY school as a non-resident and it was my single most expensive year as an undergrad. As a non-resident you will get no aid outside of federal loans and, if you are lucky, federal grants. Halfway through that year I applied to a highly ranked liberal arts college and got a full tuition scholarship and a much better education.

Make sure you visit the school, meet with the professors and students and throughly investigate the programs you are interested in. Many of the CUNYs are very good, but some are just okay and the one that I went to was downright awful.
posted by a22lamia at 11:54 AM on December 26, 2009


Check if Cooper Union still covers full tuition for all students, and if their arts program accomodates your interests.
posted by availablelight at 12:46 PM on December 26, 2009


Cooper Union only has art, architecture, and engineering degrees, if I remember correctly.
posted by leotrotsky at 1:09 PM on December 26, 2009


Cooper Union is still tuition-free and leotrotsky is correct about its majors. It's also extraordinarily competitive. Much more so than even Columbia.
posted by dfriedman at 1:32 PM on December 26, 2009


CUNY is a great suggestion. You can establish residency in one year, so if you were to start right away it would only be one year of out-of-state tuition. At 26, you might be particularly interested in CUNY's Baccalaureate Program (individualized studies). Empire State College would be another excellent choice. It is an Adult Campus of SUNY in NYC, and a very interesting place. Like CUNY you can establish residency in one year.
posted by Pineapplicious at 7:26 PM on December 26, 2009 [1 favorite]


Thanks! I'm actually looking at community college more and more, seems like i'd be way cheaper and I could establish residency and then transfer over.
posted by mattsweaters at 8:06 PM on December 26, 2009


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