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2000 bottle of champagne still good?
December 26, 2009 10:40 AM   Subscribe

2000 bottle of vintage champagne. Still good? Brand is Veuve Cliquot. It is an actual vintage bottle, not a non-vintage,
posted by Ironmouth to Food & Drink (14 answers total) 1 user marked this as a favorite
 
Good champagne like Veuve Clicquot keeps for up to 10 years if stored decently, although it's past its best. I bet it's still good, but it has to be drunk soon; in the worst case, it will be a nice white wine with a few bubbles.
posted by Spanner Nic at 10:52 AM on December 26, 2009


Its been in my brother's fridge since 2003. Just sitting there.
posted by Ironmouth at 10:55 AM on December 26, 2009


Still good.
posted by jeffamaphone at 11:48 AM on December 26, 2009


Should be fine. :)
posted by smoke at 2:58 PM on December 26, 2009


Uh, no, it's probably ruined. But you can't just throw stuff like that in the trash as it's a bit of an environmental hazard. Best send it to me so I can dispose of it properly.

...

It's fine. Enjoy it today!
posted by twirlypen at 3:12 PM on December 26, 2009


Lucky dog. VC is yummy bubbly. Enjoy the New Year!
posted by Thorzdad at 3:57 PM on December 26, 2009


According to their website, vintage-specific bottles can be aged 10-25 years depending on the style.....boy, would I love to find one of those kicking around my fridge! Happy New Year!
posted by missmary6 at 4:05 PM on December 26, 2009


Drink and enjoy.
posted by dirtynumbangelboy at 8:46 PM on December 26, 2009


"Waiter, a bottle of Veuve Clicquot 1926, a very good wine."

From Casablanca, set in 1941, so that champagne was 15 years old. As time goes by...
posted by exphysicist345 at 8:57 PM on December 26, 2009


A fridge is really too cold for storing champagne that long. Have a back up bottle ready to drink just in case.
posted by oddovid at 3:30 AM on December 27, 2009


Might still be okay, but the fridge might have killed it. Veuve Clicquot is indeed excellent, so it could go either way. Lesser-quality champagnes definitely wouldn't be good any more. Wines, champagne included, are meant to be stored at a constant temperature, preferably between 10°C and 16°C (I live in France, where this is "common knowledge"), in the dark, on their sides, somewhere without excessive humidity. Champagnes should only be chilled just before they're served. Champagne Facts from the National Restaurant Association is good.

They address your question too:
I have an older bottle of champagne. Is it still drinkable?
Because of strict aging requirements, champagnes are ready to drink when they are released to the market. (Classic nonvintage champagnes are generally aged in the cellar for 2 to 3 years, and vintage champagnes for 4 to 5 years.) However, most champagnes will age well if properly stored. Typically, classic champagnes can be kept for about 5 years, and vintage champagnes for about 10 years after their release. Keep in mind that, like other wines, champagnes change as they age. These changes will become more pronounced after 5 years. As champagnes evolve, the fruit aromas of a younger wine will evolve into dried fruit, honey, nutty and toasty flavors. Champagnes also take on a deeper-golden color as they age and tend to lose some of their effervescence. Although many consumers prefer fresher, younger champagnes, some people appreciate the characteristics of older champagnes as well, especially with a meal.
posted by fraula at 3:48 AM on December 27, 2009


Specifically with sparkling wines including champagne, it depends on what it is.

Actual champagne? Yes, aging can actually improve it. At the very least you'll be no worse off.

A wonderful alternative beverage like a nice fruity prosecco, however, is a different type of grape and can noticeably deteriorate within 2 years.

Long story short, like everyone else said, you'll be fine.
posted by carlh at 1:43 PM on December 27, 2009


Vintage Veuve Clicqout should keep for quite a few years. I just read that the 1996's are beginning to open up now, but I wouldn't mind something much older. I am a bit worried about the storage, though, but I would certainly give it a try.

Remember that 2000 is not one of the great Champagne Vintages like 1999 or 2002, so it probably won't last 25 years like those surely will. On the other hand, I am drinking 2000 and 2002 at the moment of a smaller producer, Lenoble, and they drink very well right now :-)
posted by KimG at 7:36 PM on December 27, 2009


Remember that 2000 is not one of the great Champagne Vintages like 1999 or 2002, so it probably won't last 25 years like those surely will. On the other hand, I am drinking 2000 and 2002 at the moment of a smaller producer, Lenoble, and they drink very well right now :-)

I went and checked after writing the question. It's a 1999.
posted by Ironmouth at 11:33 AM on December 28, 2009


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