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No bullshit jobs!
April 21, 2009 8:07 AM   Subscribe

Kick ass jobs for kick ass people like myself.

Well that's kind of an overstatement, but until I get my big kid job, I'm looking for something that will suit me.

It seems like the more structure in an environment increases, my ability to function decreases. For some reason school is an exception, but that's another topic.

I already have a kick-ass job. I work for the most laidback people ever. As long as I get their work done, they don't give a damn what I do. No 1001 rules, written or unwritten. No workplace politics. No bullshit. Oh, and there are entertaining moments, I'm not going to list what I am doing, but lets just say that we deal with some of the dregs of society. I have an interesting story to tell my friends, weekly. In other words I work in a really relaxed environment, on the other hand I don't die of boredom.

What more I can ask for?

Well, this is only part-time. Until I find a full-time job (goodness knows when this will be), I need to find part-time job number 2.

I've had very bad experiences working part-time jobs in the past. I think I was just looking in the wrong places. So what are some cool jobs (little structure) out there besides waiting tables (ME FAIL), working the cash register (ME FAIL), and flipping burgers (EW)? Oh, and pay is at least $10 an hour.
posted by sixcolors to Work & Money (105 answers total) 16 users marked this as a favorite
 
how old are you?
posted by majortom1981 at 8:14 AM on April 21, 2009


Old enough to know which environments suit me and which ones don't.
posted by sixcolors at 8:16 AM on April 21, 2009


Sorry if that sounded sarcastic. I'm not. There's just some details I don't like putting on the internet.

I'm over 21 and under 30 if that helps.
posted by sixcolors at 8:19 AM on April 21, 2009


Where are you?
posted by box at 8:23 AM on April 21, 2009


lets just say that we deal with some of the dregs of society

Generally the less structured a work environment is the more "dregs" you have to deal with.

For example, you could sell pot (you didn't say you were looking for legitimate employment) and have the most laid back job on earth, but then you'd really be dealing with dregs.

You sound painfully young (whether you are or not is moot, that's the way you sound.) Have you considered higher education? There are lots of careers out there which have what you're looking for, but are only open to people with degrees.
posted by wfrgms at 8:24 AM on April 21, 2009


I have a friend who worked in a surveying crew part time, and it sounded pretty casual. Not sure what it paid, but they were outside every day which always sounded sort of cool.

I also spent quite a bit of time working in pizza delivery. If trying to beat a clock isn't too structured, we typically did quite a bit better than $10/hr.
posted by jquinby at 8:25 AM on April 21, 2009


It would also help if you specified your skills and experience, and any relevant education, and what you like in a workplace besides "no bullshit." And why, exactly, you're not good at waiting tables, and what you are good at. I can understand your reluctance to put your personal info online, but for questions like this, the more details the better.

Temping may be for you. Not all temp jobs are relaxed, but you can sometimes get a good long-term part-time or full-time assignment with flexible hours and a low-key environment (I worked one such assignment for several months and loved it). Call local agencies and see if they have anything like that - but be aware they may not be inclined to call you if you're ultra-picky about the assignments you're willing to take.
posted by Metroid Baby at 8:25 AM on April 21, 2009


But not old enough to realize that when you're hurting for cash enough that you can't move out of your parents' house, you may have to consider "ew" jobs?

I hope you haven't ruled those out completely. But if "fun" jobs are your first priority, go to the places you like to go and see if they need help. For example, a friend of mine used to assist at a museum with setting up displays and filing and whatnot. She absolutely loved her job and as an added perk, she got into all their events free. It required no special training, and it was part time. There was some structure there. And she sometimes had to deal with moldy papers in the basement. But, you're not going to escape downsides no matter where you go.
posted by katillathehun at 8:27 AM on April 21, 2009


Do you have a college degree. Thats why i asked your age yo ustate school but no indication if your still in school or what.
posted by majortom1981 at 8:31 AM on April 21, 2009


No bullshit jobs!

There's a reason it's called "paying your dues." You're at the bottom of the ladder, someone's got to do the bullshit job & it's usually the person who has no other options - people such as yourself. Sorry it's not what you want to hear, but that's life.
posted by torquemaniac at 8:33 AM on April 21, 2009 [11 favorites]


So... this ideal part-time job should have no bullshit, no rules, no constraints, no regulations/politics, no cash register, no aprons, pretty decent pay, should be fun and also keep you in the LOLz.... And you'd like this tall order fulfilled during a recession where highly skilled, highly educated people are being laid off and are taking cash register/apron jobs to get by?

I don't know if there is a lot of hiring going on in "fun" sectors. Fun gets cut out when budgets get slashed. I'd try a childrens' museum or indoor play area. You could also try working the floor at a bookstore, re-shelfing books, helping people find the books they are looking for. But I imagine you're not going to float around in either of those jobs without the structure or regulations. I'd guess there's probably going to be more WTF! than LOLZ! at those jobs too.

Adult life has bullshit at every turn.
posted by jerseygirl at 8:38 AM on April 21, 2009 [32 favorites]


I submit to you, sixcolors, that the kickassitude of your current employment has everything to do with the laid-back attitude of your employer, and nothing whatsoever to do with the actual job. Imagine what your current job would be like if you worked for a hard-ass.

Rather than think in terms of specific industries or skills that you like or are good at, why don't you network a little and see if you can find another boss who is similarly laid back as your current one? Who knows? you may find a hidden talent in an industry you'd never have thought of getting work in.

Just a thought.
posted by LN at 8:40 AM on April 21, 2009


And why, exactly, you're not good at waiting tables, and what you are good at.

Horrible memory. I mean horrible. Especially verbal/spoken information. Even worse is when the information is sent a rapid fire speed. When I said I don't want to work somewhere there are a 1001 rules, its not only because I'm on the free-spirited side, I simply don't remember them.

But, you're not going to escape downsides no matter where you go.

That's cool, and I understand that. But there are deal-breakers, and a highly structured enviornment is one of them.

Do you have a college degree.

Si. Two of them.
posted by sixcolors at 8:41 AM on April 21, 2009


I loved working at a movie theater. It pays crap, unless you learn how to be a projectionist (and you live in a place where projectionist is not a unionized position that would be inaccessible to you). You do have to clean up other people's messes and make fairly gross food, but a lot of the work time is unstructured time of cleaning and making popcorn, between rushes when movies end and the next ones start. It's got great perks (free movies and popcorn!). And most of the work is at night and on the weekends, so it's readily compatible with another job that pays better.
posted by hydropsyche at 8:42 AM on April 21, 2009


Overnight stocker at a grocery store is pretty laid back.
posted by rtha at 8:42 AM on April 21, 2009


If you have two college degrees, why not try to work in those fields?
posted by bshort at 8:47 AM on April 21, 2009 [3 favorites]


Following up on rtha, pretty much anything 2nd or 3rd shift will be laid back and pay more, because the boss will be off somewhere else and/or the public and higher ups won't be around. The downside is that it can mess up your internal clock, but you're young, you can take it.
posted by Brandon Blatcher at 8:49 AM on April 21, 2009


If you have two college degrees, why not try to work in those fields?

I'm turned down constantly because of my lack of experience.
posted by sixcolors at 8:50 AM on April 21, 2009


I hate to say it, but "cool jobs", especially those with little structure, generally require that one have a degree or experience in a related field. Most creative class (and god, I hate that phrase, but I don't have a better word for it) jobs are reasonably close to what you want, but you don't get those jobs by showing up and asking for a job--you get them by doing an internship full of scut work, and then by moving to a position that's a little cooler but still fairly tedious, and you keep moving up like that. Eventually (maybe after five years, maybe after twenty, depending on the field and your skills) you end up with a cool job where you have a fair amount of autonomy.

It actually sounds like your current job has some aspects of this--you're working part-time at something that's awesome, and until you can do it full time or until you can find something equally awesome full time, you need to get a second job so that you can afford to live. Many people have to do this. You're not entitled to a job that's fun or cool, and especially in this job market, you're not a special snowflake. You already have one job that's great--it may be time for you to accept that in the meantime, you need to take something that's mediocre, boring, or demeaning so that you're able to pay the bills.

I'd suggest taking whatever you can get right now, even if it doesn't match your personal idea of cool job. Flip burgers, clean offices, learn to wait tables. Keep busting your ass at the fun job, and any time that a full-time position there for which you're qualified comes up, apply for it. Eventually, if you're lucky, you'll end up doing something that is cool full time.
posted by MeghanC at 8:50 AM on April 21, 2009


Most people who work in an unstructured environment have earned that right by successfully sticking with the rules at a highly structured environment and have proved themselves to be attentive, productive, and trustworthy enough to not need it.
posted by asockpuppet at 8:50 AM on April 21, 2009 [9 favorites]


Also, if you love your current job so much, you should discuss your dilemma with your awesome boss. Let her know that you need more hours and see if she can get you more time on the schedule or see if she knows of any other awesome bosses that have open positions for awesome jobs. Business owners are typically highly networked individuals.
posted by bshort at 8:51 AM on April 21, 2009


I'd agree with the temp agency idea - It's really rare to find 'We need you to come in for 20 hours a week and be awesome' in the workplace, but they may be able to help you find 'We need you to come in for 20 hours a week to do fairly easy but mindless data entry, and we don't mind if you browse the web a bit and/or listen to music while you do it as long as you aren't being obnoxious to your coworkers.'

That's basically how I spent most of my first summer after college.

I think that ideas like a children's museum or play areas aren't bad either, but I don't know if they've got a children's museum in your area - I can just about guarantee there are business looking for data entry.
posted by BZArcher at 8:53 AM on April 21, 2009


sixcolors: "If you have two college degrees, why not try to work in those fields?

I'm turned down constantly because of my lack of experience.
"

That's fixable. If you love either of the two fields you have degrees in then you should do what you can to get experience. It may not be as laid back as your current situation, but it could be in the long run, and it's probably going to pay better than the $10 an hour you're looking for.
posted by bshort at 8:55 AM on April 21, 2009


asockpuppet: "Most people who work in an unstructured environment have earned that right by successfully sticking with the rules at a highly structured environment and have proved themselves to be attentive, productive, and trustworthy enough to not need it."

This is exactly right. You don't get flexibility without trust, and you don't get trust without proving yourself.
posted by bshort at 8:56 AM on April 21, 2009


Were fun jobs that don't involve anything gross, any manning a register, or any hard work and still pay well over minimum wage for part time work plentiful we wouldn't be nearing 10% unemployment. I suspect you will find most of the jobs people consider acceptable to be too difficult if those are your standards. I've worked in theme parks. Yeah, you can get away with anything if you do your job. But even with that working in theme parks is a step above working in hell. You will get kicked by children. Perhaps vomited on. Perhaps assaulted by an adult. You will also get sunstroke. I've worked in bookstores. If flipping burgers rates "ew" I don't think you will react well to going home every day with arms that ache so bad you can barely hold on to the steering wheel from lugging hardcovers to shelves above your head for hours. Or having to talk to people who are looking for "that new book everyone is talking about. the cover is a black and white photo. no, I don't have the author or title, aren't you the one working in a bookstore?!"

You'll either need to list what marketable skills you have, or sadly accept that crap jobs may be your lot in life until you get some of those skills. (and even then, in this economy... right now, I have a list of certifications as long as my arm from before I got laid off and my requirements have been dwindled down to "a job I can pay my rent on." My sole consolation is that I found out my former employer had to end up hiring five people overseas to fill my one job instead of the two they hoped to replace me with)
posted by Kellydamnit at 8:57 AM on April 21, 2009 [1 favorite]


Overnight shift at a convenience store - laid back (usually no boss there at all if even other employees), slow pace, interesting customers (to say the least), probably decent pay (maybe not $10 tho).

My first job out of college was overnights at a convenience store and it was kind of awesome.
posted by tristeza at 8:59 AM on April 21, 2009


It might be worth considering that bullshit jobs that allow you to build experience, contacts or skills will ultimately bring much greater freedom to turn down bullshit or pick amongst employers. Also, rules and workplace politics are totally an employer-by-employer issue, but if you can get above entry-level jobs (and with two degrees, it seems like you could), I've found the ridiculous rules tend to peter out.

Please, please never refer to anyone as 'the dregs of society', especially if you're working with people. It's despicable and decidedly not ass-kicking.
posted by carbide at 8:59 AM on April 21, 2009 [10 favorites]


Look for small businesses. I worked a while for a small bulk-mailing company with very easy to work with owners, and it seemed like it might fit your description. I did data processing and printer operation all by myself in a cubicle, which worked for me, but the more extroverted folks who worked in the warehouse running the machines/stuffing the packages or envelopes always seemed to be having a good time as well. There was structure in the sense that it was very important that the work be done correctly, but because it was a small organization I was working directly for the owners - no dress codes, no long chains of command, no forms in triplicate. If the work was done on time and done well, that was all that mattered.

This is all to say - look for a small business with owners whose working style you can live with, and who need someone with your skills.
posted by Daily Alice at 9:04 AM on April 21, 2009


Seconding working at a movie theater. Or try to get a job with the Cencus.
posted by kimdog at 9:05 AM on April 21, 2009


When I was 21 I drove a truck. All you do is go to the shop in the morning and load up with equipment, get your route for the day, stop at job sites where you make your drop offs and hang out with dudes who are often drunk and/or hilarious then drive back to the shop in the afternoon and hang out with more hilarious dudes who are killing time clowning around before hitting the bar and then go home. Occasionally, you get injured, which sucks. But otherwise there's not too many people on your back and the bulk of the day is all about smoking cigarettes and listening to Foreigner on classic rock radio.
posted by The Straightener at 9:05 AM on April 21, 2009 [1 favorite]


What degrees do you have?

Also: stripper, escort or porn actor.

Maybe some hotel jobs. Not a night auditor position, but like a late night bell hop, valet or van driver. There's structure and rules, but with fewer people around it can be laid-back and the guests are bizarre and entertaining. Not a good economy for that though.

I'd also say bouncer, but those tend to be dudes.

Maybe a secret shopper? Seems like they'd need younger women.
posted by mullacc at 9:06 AM on April 21, 2009


Jobs that everyone wants don't pay very well, because everyone wants them.

It would be helpful to know what degrees you had. If you like school you could go back and get your masters in those fields and become a lecturer. Academic life is pretty laid back, you have to do a lot of prep work for classes, and grading, but you do those things on your own schedule.
posted by delmoi at 9:22 AM on April 21, 2009


The two best jobs I've ever had were delivering pizza and driving the beer cart at a golf course. Both are way easy, you get great tips, and everyone enjoys seeing the bearer of pizza and/or beer.
posted by geekchic at 9:22 AM on April 21, 2009 [2 favorites]


It sounds like what you are looking for is a teen comedy movie inspired job that doesn't exist in reality. Really, it comes down to the question of "What are you qualified to do?" as in what skills do you have? From the tone and content of your question it doesn't sound like you are willing to learn to do much other than what you already know, so it's important to be honest and sell yourself on what you already know how to do. Maybe you could do something entrepreneurial and post a work wanted ad on Craigslist or similar venue. Maybe you could get part-time gigs here and there to supplement your current income.

Oh, and I'd very much discourage you from going with a temp agency as they are particularly looking for candidates that have exactly the qualifications you say fit you least. In those environments, you have to learn all the little rules of each new workplace you enter and you have to do so with the professional demeanor of a consultant.
posted by mrmojoflying at 9:38 AM on April 21, 2009 [2 favorites]


The problem is you.

You say you have this sweet job, but it's part-time, and sounds like you're being paid to essentially do very little. You wonder why no one will buy your bags of overpriced popcorn or why "normal" people won't date you in the face of your aggressive personality.

When I said I don't want to work somewhere there are a 1001 rules, its not only because I'm on the free-spirited side, I simply don't remember them.

Bullshit. You're not trying hard enough. Work on it. As asockpuppet said above, you don't get to break the rules without learning them first.

For some reason school is an exception, but that's another topic.

I think the reason this is the case is because there's actually something at stake. You (or your parents) are paying decent dough for an education and expect to get something out of it. Take this attitude toward you in your work and social life.

The world will not come easy to you- you've got to work for it.
posted by mkultra at 9:38 AM on April 21, 2009 [5 favorites]


mkultra

Ummm...no. I worked hard both at school and on this current job, but neither place had tons of structure.

I'm not asking for the easy way out, lack of structure does not always translate into "easy". In fact, super organized people like my father fall apart in environments where there is little structure.

I'm not understanding how standards=entitlement. If I have to flip burgers one day because I have absolutely no choice, so be it. Until then I'm looking for some where I will enjoy or at least tolerate.
posted by sixcolors at 9:47 AM on April 21, 2009


Oh and college and grad school deals a lot with theory and research. Despite my poor spelling and grammar usage, my professors enjoyed reading my papers (they enjoyed the content I provided), and I received high points for them. For some reason I tend to do well in those two areas.
posted by sixcolors at 9:54 AM on April 21, 2009


I'm turned down constantly because of my lack of experience.
do not forget to add you are also "overqualified" for the crap jobs that other less qualified people can get hired for. i have heard that multiple times at interviews at places which did not hire me because of the two degrees.

i am in almost your same position, most likely in a different place. i would be thankful that you at least have a job that pays you in this economy. i volunteer at a place in my field to build up my resume, and therefore can only spend very little money. it is about what i can do where i am at. i can also wish you luck.
posted by the aloha at 9:58 AM on April 21, 2009


In this economy, "standards" of the sort that you're describing *do* equal entitlement. Thousands of people are unemployed, and thousands more are underemployed. You are clearly in need of money, yet you're unwilling to take jobs that you feel are boring or uncool. In the current economic climate, this makes you incredibly unsympathetic and, yes, entitled.

It's like, for example, a guy that I know. He got a four-year degree from what's considered to be a good school, and he landed a great job as soon as he was out of school. His job, actually, was a lot like what you're talking about--great stories to tell, very little structure, independently driven. And then, last autumn, he was fired. Not because he was bad at his job or because he was doing anything wrong, but because the company was downsizing. He picked up a part-time job that sounds rather like what you have, though presumably in a different field--it pays great, but only for 15 hours a week, and it has no benefits.

He's been underemployed for six months, I think, and he's still only working the one job, fifteen hours a week, and complaining that he needs more money. At the same time, he's unwilling to go apply for a job at the supermarket (which is offering $9 an hour), at McDonalds (looking for openers at $9.50 an hour), at the diner down the street that's looking for servers. He feels that those jobs would be "crappy", and that they'd be a "waste of his education". And he's not wrong--the odds are good that they would be. But the income of $9 or $10 an hour for thirty hours a week would be the difference between him paying his share of the rent and him sponging off of his girlfriend. I'm pretty much done feeling sorry for him, since at this point, he's making his own misery.

There's a big difference between a job that you enjoy--which, let's face it, are few and far between--and a job that you tolerate. People can tolerate an awful lot of horrible things, and if you feel that you can't "tolerate" a job at Burger King or the local WalMart, you have bigger issues than just being underemployed. (For the record, potentially bigger issues: inflated sense of self-worth, or an unreasonable sense of entitlement--things that are a lot more damaging in the long run than making less money than you'd like.)
posted by MeghanC at 10:01 AM on April 21, 2009 [3 favorites]


You could try jobs that have you working for yourself--dog-walking, house call tech support, that kind of thing. Freelancing of any type. Or jobs that normally employ college students--if you live near where you went to school and have a good relationship with a particular department or organization maybe they'll let you work in the departmental library or refer students to you for tutoring or something.
posted by phoenixy at 10:04 AM on April 21, 2009


It sounds like you're expecting autonomy without proving yourself in the autonomy-free zone. Don't. People who do the theory and research have proven themselves by washing test tubes in addition to providing enjoyable content; people who develop strategies have distinguished themselves tactically first.

Do you have any connections remaining from the people you encountered while getting college degrees? Talk to those professors who enjoyed reading your papers. Maybe someone is doing some research you could get involved in. But again, getting involved in research = making photocopies, formatting citations, pulling articles and messing with datasets, not developing grand theories based on the aforementioned .

Have you considered tutoring students working in any of the areas you studied?
posted by chesty_a_arthur at 10:04 AM on April 21, 2009


No middle ground?

Again, it may come down to me doing something like flipping burgers. What's so wrong for seeking something better first?
posted by sixcolors at 10:05 AM on April 21, 2009


If I have to flip burgers one day because I have absolutely no choice, so be it. Until then I'm looking for some where I will enjoy or at least tolerate.

You were asking recently about how to get the hell out of your parents' place, and you balked at the idea that it'd take as much as six months to raise the cash to move out on your own.

In that context, you have absolutely no choice. If you need more income now, period, you need to get another job now, and save the picking-and-choosing for some time in the hopefully-not-too-distant future when you've (a) managed to move out and (b) built up enough stability to ditch the unlikeable job for something better and harder to find.

If, on the other hand, you've realized you care less about moving out than you do about unlikeable jobs, so be it. But you sounded pretty serious about it in that other question.

With rare exceptions (the extremely lucky, the extremely privileged), everybody has worked at a job they didn't like and wouldn't have ever spent a day at if they didn't need the money to get on with living their life. You need to figure out for sure which parts of your life you're comfortable not living and adjust your outlook on employment accordingly.

Work sucks, but putting life on hold indefinitely sucks more.

Aside from that, we've asked you before to refrain from this sort of intentionally vague posting where you refuse to disclose the kind of basic details that make your question answerable. People have been making a good effort here to answer what portions of the question are actually approachable, but you need to cut it out with the coyness or just stop using AskMe for this sort of thing. We're in final-warning territory at this point, it's getting very old.
posted by cortex at 10:09 AM on April 21, 2009 [30 favorites]


There's nothing wrong with seeking something better first, but what is "better" to you? You initially asked how you can get a kick-ass job like your current one without any rules where no one cares what you do because you FAIL at cash registers, and flipping burgers is EW. Here's a tip for finding a great job *and* for getting helpful answers in AskMe: take it seriously.
posted by katillathehun at 10:10 AM on April 21, 2009 [3 favorites]



I'm looking for something that will suit me.

So what are some cool jobs (little structure) out there besides waiting tables (ME FAIL), working the cash register (ME FAIL), and flipping burgers (EW)? Oh, and pay is at least $10 an hour.

Old enough to know which environments suit me and which ones don't.

When I said I don't want to work somewhere there are a 1001 rules, its not only because I'm on the free-spirited side, I simply don't remember them.

But there are deal-breakers, and a highly structured enviornment is one of them


Are you backpedaling now?
posted by asockpuppet at 10:10 AM on April 21, 2009


well, to be honest, the is not going to be the best place to find that something better first. this site is not a job agency. neither is the white, but it is closer. like i wrote in my previous response, i am one of the few who actually agrees with you that working an even worse job is superannoying. the economy just sucks right now. i have to deal with it, too. i just do what i can and hope that something comes up (interview results nearly always pending).

it may be best for you to look for something better and something worse simultaneously. the time spent here discussing sympathy is not being spent looking through your local paper, monster, etc.
posted by the aloha at 10:14 AM on April 21, 2009


There's nothing wrong with seeking something better first, but what is "better" to you? You initially asked how you can get a kick-ass job like your current one without any rules where no one cares what you do because you FAIL at cash registers, and flipping burgers is EW. Here's a tip for finding a great job *and* for getting helpful answers in AskMe: take it seriously.

Better? Anything that doesn't involove handling money, I suck at numbers. Where verbal orders are fired to me at rapid speed, I'm blessed with a lot of things, but excellent memory for verbal information isn't one of them. I'm vegetarian and icked out by handling meat. And I function best when there is little structure

I was just assuming there were tons of jobs that don't involve those first three things. Other than that I don't have a lot of standards. Maybe I am wrong, that's why I asked here to find out...
posted by sixcolors at 10:20 AM on April 21, 2009


I was just assuming there were tons of jobs

well, there you go. due to recent economic conditions, there is a recession going on. job losses are peaking and we can only hope that everyone comes out alright. in the meantime, there are layoffs and firings going on at most companies in most places.
posted by the aloha at 10:24 AM on April 21, 2009


What kind of job are you looking for after you graduate? What do you expect your big kid job to be?
posted by asockpuppet at 10:26 AM on April 21, 2009


If I were an employer, I would not trust someone who can't remember food orders to do anything more important than that. You probably cost the restaurant a small amount of repeat business. No one is going to give you a job where the consequences of making mistakes are bigger unless you show through your prior work history that you can stop making mistakes. Until then, flip burgers and don't burn them.
posted by slow graffiti at 10:28 AM on April 21, 2009


If I were an employer, I would not trust someone who can't remember food orders to do anything more important than that. You probably cost the restaurant a small amount of repeat business. No one is going to give you a job where the consequences of making mistakes are bigger unless you show through your prior work history that you can stop making mistakes. Until then, flip burgers and don't burn them.

I completly agree. That's why I'm trying to stay away from places like that. Its fortunate that all the instructions are written where I work...and when I was in school. The poor listening compreshension is a pretty serious thing for me, enough that when I was in elementary school they wanted me to take LD classes for it. Its been that way all my life.

What kind of job are you looking for after you graduate? What do you expect your big kid job to be?

Ok, ok, ok, I will reveal what I went to school for...

...I received a masters in school counseling.
posted by sixcolors at 10:37 AM on April 21, 2009 [2 favorites]


You can't remember food orders, you can't work a cash register, you don't want to work in an office, you don't want to work as a cook.

Sounds like landscaping or pool service are going to be your best bets for entry-level part-time jobs. (In a different economy, I would suggest construction, but not now.)

Or you could keep living at home and get a part-time internship in the career field your studies are preparing you for. That isn't going to deliver the short-term infusion of cash, but it might be an effective long-term investment in getting the experience you need to get jobs in your preferred field.
posted by Sidhedevil at 10:37 AM on April 21, 2009


Well, that's a start. Let's break it down. Handling meat makes you ill. You're not good with numbers. You don't feel confident that you can hit the ground running in a fast-paced, rigid environment. That rules out money-handling, most food prep, and jobs for which you may not be qualified just yet anyway. Keep in mind, however, that the number of slower-paced, easy jobs gets lower the higher the pay is.

Here are some things worth considering. I'm not saying these are *easy* jobs, but they may be slower-paced or at least help you to acclimate to a faster pace when you move on to a full-time position:

Dog walking
Animal shelters
Dish washing
House keeping/cleaning
Temping - but as others have mentioned, don't be picky about your assignments.
Helping out at a museum/antique store/used book store/or basically any small shop
Work at a nursery - a plant one, that is. Based on your specifications, childcare is not for you.
File clerk
Receptionist/answering phones

Those are just a few. Whatever you find, be proactive with your tasks. Show that you care. Let your employers get to know you and your interests, too. My first "real" job was at a VERY-rigidly structured oil company. But that didn't mean my boss(es) weren't good people to work with. I took my job seriously, but they knew I wanted to be a graphic designer, not a payroll tax assistant/file clerk/every other boring thing I did. So, they would sometimes give me little "creative" tasks on the side or take me down to meet people in the company's design department. If I had stayed there, I would have eventually been moved to the design department, but I had lucked into a design position halfway across the country. Anything is possible if you have the right attitude.
posted by katillathehun at 10:47 AM on April 21, 2009 [1 favorite]


Taxi driver
Bicycle courier
FedEx/UPS delivery driver
Pizza delivery
Dog walker, babysitter, plant waterer, housekeeper, car washer
Lawn care
Outside sales rep.
Night-time security
Lifeguard
posted by Houstonian at 10:50 AM on April 21, 2009


If school counseling is your ultimate goal, and it meets your criteria in terms of not involving money or cooking or office work, why not put all your energy into pursuing that right now? In other words, if you've already found a niche that suits you, why put off pursuing it in order to try to find... another, temporary niche? Admittedly, I'm not familiar with the field, but there must necessarily be something you could be doing to get yourself closer to the "big kid" job. If you've applied for jobs in the school counseling area and have been turned down, have you tried meeting informally with people already working in the field to strategize? Have you looked into volunteering or interning options? (You could stay in your current part-time job, work a volunteer gig or low-/un-paid internship in your career area, and then try to parlay that into a full-time job in school counseling or a resume-builder to get you into a full-time job.)

You have a part time job that suits you. You might be able to find another. But why? Why pursue these things that don't get your closer to your desired career? I ask because the type of position you're looking for isn't one that is likely to get you closer to other goals you might have (it's hard to save up to move out if you're working a laid-back, part-time minimum wage job, etc.).
posted by Meg_Murry at 10:55 AM on April 21, 2009 [1 favorite]


I understand not being comfortable with numbers and money-handling... but that problem is actually solved by cash registers. They should be in your "pro" column. Retail is more fun and less stinky than food service, and the schedule can probably work around your current employment.

Also, I think you might like theme park work, if that's an option. Kellydamnit makes damn fine points, but there is some fun built into the workplace and there is a definite end in sight.

Food for thought: You have one good job that you like already, you lucky dog. Make a plan to work a 3-6 month stint at a less-awesome job to save up your money, improve your references, and pick up an extra skill or two for your resume.
posted by juliplease at 10:56 AM on April 21, 2009


Bickering aside, why should I give THEM all the attention?...

Thanks for those who have been helpful in this post. I now see options that I haven't considered before. I will look into some of those. You all rock!
posted by sixcolors at 10:57 AM on April 21, 2009


It's going to be tough to get experience in your field if you go around calling people the "dregs of society."
posted by sanko at 10:57 AM on April 21, 2009 [2 favorites]


[Derail removed. sixcolors, one more remotely jerkish response out of you and you're gone, end of story.]
posted by cortex at 11:05 AM on April 21, 2009 [15 favorites]


It's going to be tough to get experience in your field if you go around calling people the "dregs of society."

Maybe I need to work on being less judgmental, but I get angry when I deal see wifebeaters and those who receive DUI after DUI. Hopefully I won't be seeing such people on a regualar basis in future jobs.
posted by sixcolors at 11:08 AM on April 21, 2009


This:

I get angry when I deal see wifebeaters and those who receive DUI after DUI. Hopefully I won't be seeing such people on a regualar basis in future jobs.

does not compute with this:

I have an interesting story to tell my friends, weekly. In other words I work in a really relaxed environment, on the other hand I don't die of boredom.

posted by katillathehun at 11:11 AM on April 21, 2009


Maybe I need to work on being less judgmental, but I get angry when I deal see wifebeaters and those who receive DUI after DUI. Hopefully I won't be seeing such people on a regualar basis in future jobs.

If you want to get into School Counseling, I'd say this should be Priority #1. Priority #2 should be working on your "poor listening comprehension", as much of the work in that field happens via conversations.
posted by mkultra at 11:13 AM on April 21, 2009 [2 favorites]


Bookkeeping is easy to learn, a book, a copy of QuickBooks, that's are about all you need. Bookkeepers are hot properties for temp agencies, which can aid in getting you a permanent placement if you want one, or you can strike out on your own. A bookeeper will make anywhere from $12 to $30 an hour, or more even.

In fact, temp agencies will provide free training on a number of marketable clerical and accounting skills, and these will underpin many types of work you can find aside from purely clerical, administrative, or bookkeeping.
posted by Ambrosia Voyeur at 11:14 AM on April 21, 2009 [2 favorites]


Mixed emotions, perhaps? Often times when the shock and sometimes anger lifts, I become amused. Hey its drama, and I enjoy it...just a tad. :)
posted by sixcolors at 11:16 AM on April 21, 2009 [1 favorite]


I was just assuming there were tons of jobs

Ah. In the middle of the worst recession since the Depression, no less! Much like you were assuming anyone could move halfway around the world without a plan because mom and dad would always just buy them a plane ticket home if it didn't work out, I guess.

Anyway. If you like animals, you could become a dog walker (assuming you're capable of being reliable enough to show up at your clients' homes on time at a regular basis; I don't know if that counts as "bullshit" in your universe, though). Or see if you can work part-time at a pet grooming store.
posted by scody at 11:16 AM on April 21, 2009 [1 favorite]


re: kati
posted by sixcolors at 11:16 AM on April 21, 2009


Sorry for the scattered, ungrammatical post, there.

Also, bookkeeping is often pretty flexible in terms of time, so you could devote time to training or volunteering in schools or social service, and beef up your resume in that arena as well.
posted by Ambrosia Voyeur at 11:16 AM on April 21, 2009


Hey its drama, and I enjoy it...just a tad.

No shit. Lemme give you a hint, as a former Drama Queen myself, which I wish I'd learned earlier in my life before permanently fucking up a lot of opportunities and relationships: you enjoy it infinitely more than anyone around you does.

posted by scody at 11:18 AM on April 21, 2009 [16 favorites]


You like University City. I have no idea if you live there or not, but if you live in the St. Louis area, have you tried volunteering/low-pay jobs for the Project Appleseed? Maybe not as a school counselor, but just a foot-in-the-door job?
posted by Houstonian at 11:29 AM on April 21, 2009


Hey its drama, and I enjoy it...just a tad

Yes, thanks, I think anyone who is even remotely familiar with your history at this site is well aware that you enjoy drama.

On topic, if you really have a master's degree in school counseling, why don't you pursue something in, or at least related to, your field? Surely the university from which you received that degree has a career services office of some sort, right? Go talk to them. They likely have a hell of a lot of experience helping people to find entry-level positions related to the field(s) in which they received their graduate degrees. That's what their jobs are.
posted by dersins at 11:36 AM on April 21, 2009 [1 favorite]


Hey its drama, and I enjoy it...just a tad. :)

Seriously? No, really?

If you're going to be in that line of work, any kind of counseling or social work where people seek you out for assistance, you need to not take some weird twisted enjoyment out of their drama. Gawking at the car accidents of the human condition is more along the lines of tabloid journalism and paparazzi. The world already has one Perez Hilton too many, so that occupational avenue is out.
posted by jerseygirl at 11:36 AM on April 21, 2009 [5 favorites]


Nthing Temping and Ambrosia's suggestion of bookkeeping.

When I was just out of college, unsure of what to do with myself, and feeling like a total-fuck up who couldn't remember anything or behave properly in social situations, I was amazed that people would pay me $16 an hour to put on pantyhose and do their bookeeping, answer phones, make their PowerPoint presentations. Some of the jobs were much better than I expected. Some worse.

I almost didn't take a clerical temp job because it was at a coal export company, and as a young idealistic person that set off my yuck meter. It turned out to be one of the best (and highest paying) jobs, with one of the kindest most supportive staffs I've ever worked with, and it gave my ego a little boost when my boss was thrilled with the simple graphic design I did for a report. It should have been telling that my boss had started in my position and stayed with the company for 20 years working up to Vice President. I couldn't have asked for nicer people. I also worked a job in my "dream field" that totally sucked. And I've worked numerous clerical jobs where the work was dull, but people were nice enough, and it brought in a paycheck.

Since then I've worked freelance (with great clients), but I don't think I would have had the courage to go out on my own without building up some confidence (and money) dressing up like Dolly Parton in 9 to 5.
posted by ladypants at 11:43 AM on April 21, 2009 [1 favorite]


When you say "school counseling" you mean the kind of person who helps a student figure out their catalog rights or class requirements....right? Or are you looking for a job where you are the kind of counselor who helps kids with their problems dealing with life?
posted by sageleaf at 11:49 AM on April 21, 2009


Can I also suggest the possibility of freelance work or taking up a hobby as a writer? As others have noted, your posts are compelling and filled with drama. These are awesome qualities for a writer. Maybe you could start a blog and make money from ads. Or start a new form of poetry. Either way, your posts rile people up, and I see that one of your questions got over a hundred replies. There's an underutilized talent in there somewhere.
posted by ladypants at 11:51 AM on April 21, 2009


County and state-level government jobs, which on paper you are probably qualified with a master's degree. Contact your local workforce development office to see what jobs might suit your interests and qualifications. You do have to be able to take and pass relatively simple civil service exams. Personally, at one point I almost became a "Forest Educator," which meant that I would have given educational tours of state forests.
posted by mrmojoflying at 12:00 PM on April 21, 2009


Also, have you contacted the school where you studied counseling about finding a job? Even if they don't offer job placement, many departments get help-wanted ads geared towards their students. Even a quick trip to check out their bulletin boards could offer some good leads. It's a strange time of year for school jobs, but you can also try contacting local schools about work, even if it's just per-diem or subbing. People get sick or go on maternity leave year 'round.
posted by ladypants at 12:06 PM on April 21, 2009


You could try getting in touch with the American Counseling Association and see if they have any advice for getting work in your field (yes, I realize that is very meta). Here is their list of reginal branches if you want a local contact.
posted by Kattullus at 12:16 PM on April 21, 2009


I would think poor listening comprehension would rule out most temp office jobs, especially if you have a low tolerance for spoken/unspoken rules, office politics & BS. In my experience, waiting tables (even with screwing up an order) is MUCH easier than deciphering executive-ese...
posted by Space Kitty at 12:17 PM on April 21, 2009


From the anecdotes my friends share there seems to be a fair amount of drug use in food service jobs (and plentiful cocaine in many fast paced kitchens). It could just be that my server/chef friends love the white stuff, but if this is actually a trend across the industry then the OP might choose to steer clear of that kind of drama.
posted by ladypants at 12:39 PM on April 21, 2009


It's a trend across the industry.

In my experience, if you have a choice between a pothead kitchen and a cokehead kitchen (for working in, that is), choose the pothead one.
posted by rtha at 12:50 PM on April 21, 2009 [2 favorites]


In my experience, if you have a choice between a pothead kitchen and a cokehead kitchen (for working in, that is), choose the pothead one.

Perhaps true, but if I have the choice between being served from a pothead kitchen or a cokehead kitchen, I would always choose the later. But I agree with ladypants that perhaps sixcolors should avoid both since it doesn't sound like dealing with other people's complex needs are something they want.
posted by mrmojoflying at 12:53 PM on April 21, 2009 [1 favorite]


Cleaning lady/janitorial service. They pay around $10 an hour here, which means more almost anywhere else. Also, the truck driving suggestion is a good one; UPS in particular is supposed to be great to work for.

I haven't got a whole lot of answers for you, but as a longtime museum professional, I do want to suggest to you and to the others who have mentioned it that museum work is neither easy to get into nor should it really be seen as a stopgap job like fast food or a convenience store. Most entry level jobs in museums are handled by either interns or volunteers and the ones that are left usually go to people who are actually seeking full time careers in the field and have the requisite background. Besides, convenience stores pay better.
posted by mygothlaundry at 1:12 PM on April 21, 2009 [2 favorites]


Work the front desk of a B&B... especially in the off-season, it's supremely easy though may not be extremely well-paying (but offers free time for other pursuits).
posted by cranberrymonger at 1:33 PM on April 21, 2009


I know you marked this answered, but check out exterior/interior house painting. A lot of the guys are hit hard right now as people are putting off house maintenance in the recession, but if you can find a guy who will take you, it's good outdoor work. This is work that depends a lot on what your boss is like though. My boss is great, a laid back funny guy, but there are dicks in the business, so your experience may vary.

Entry level is no less then $10 an hour if you have a car, frequently under the table, but perhaps not with you due to your age (you'll be competing with 17+ for entry level, but most bosses would prefer an older, bit more mature guy from my experience)

The work isn't that hard for something that's considered part of the construction business. You will most likely meet lots of cool and crazy guys, probably smoke some weed, drink on the job on Friday afternoons occasionally, get a great tan, and totally destroy a few pairs of pants your first summer. Hours are usually pretty flexible too.

Again, though, this experience will totally depend on who you work for though, so maybe talk to his workers a little on the sly and see if he's a boss you'd like.

Also, just because you're having fun doesn't mean you aren't working hard too. I work with a crazy crew, but we still do our work efficiently and have some of the highest quality I have seen in the area. That's probably why we get away with as much as we do.
posted by jellywerker at 1:36 PM on April 21, 2009


I would like to second what MGL says about museum work. Most museums are operating on tight budgets and small staffs (even moreso in the current climate, which has been out-and-out disastrous for many museums), and most entry-level paid employees are generally expected to A) have degrees (often advanced) in related fields and B) work their asses off, usually for very low wages. Even in the positions that don't require degrees (such as preparation/installation work), the "work your ass off" condition still holds.

If you want to stroll in when you feel like it and "avoid bullshit" (i.e., putz around without consequences), you can get away with doing that for a (short) while as an unpaid intern or volunteer, but it won't earn you anything except the enmity of the museum employees who are actually trying to do a professional job under increasingly difficult circumstances.

posted by scody at 1:47 PM on April 21, 2009 [1 favorite]


You might enjoy this book, which I think would be very instructive in getting to the point of being one of the "most people" that asockpuppet references:

Most people who work in an unstructured environment have earned that right by successfully sticking with the rules at a highly structured environment and have proved themselves to be attentive, productive, and trustworthy enough to not need it.
posted by niles at 1:49 PM on April 21, 2009


You should maybe consider not what you do, but when. Night shift jobs tend to be low stress, low workload, and almost zero supervision (apart from the obvious exceptions, like Denny's, for example). If you're alright with being awake all night some place quiet, with no people around and not much to do, a night shift job might be ideal for you.
posted by Marisa Stole the Precious Thing at 2:04 PM on April 21, 2009


What mgl and scody say about museum work is also true about library work--and, honestly, pretty true about nonprofits in general.
posted by box at 2:05 PM on April 21, 2009


Since the question of whether or not your expectations are realistic has been pretty thoroughly addressed, allow me to share with you my work experiences between the time that I got my baccalaureate and my first library job. I graduated with no significant work experience in the quote-endquote real world; I'd worked my last year as a resident assistant in the dorm, but if I'd known what the next few months would be like, looking for an entry-level job in a college town, I'd have gotten any job I could have found outside college instead.

During the next four-and-a-half years, I was: unemployed, doing yard/simple maintenance chores for senior citizens as needed, working part-time as a child care worker at a group home for developmentally-disabled children with behavior problems (and, trust me, you haven't had a "shit" job until you've dealt with kids who ate their own), full-time at the same, janitor (better pay, bennies and hours than the child care worker gig, and less dealing with human waste products), unemployed again, night-time home alarm monitor, live-in senior citizen aide, mail room at the local newspaper, pizza maker, janitor again(not as nice as the previous stint). This sort of thing quickly grew tiresome.

Someone pointed out to me that, not only did I like libraries, but I also had some relevant experience via the information and referral part of my volunteer work at a local crisis hotline. I took the civil service test, aced it, and went to interview for library clerk jobs at the nearest university with a library school... nine times. Each interview involved a 100-mile round trip via intercity bus, which not only cut into my virtually-nonexistent discretionary funds, but also into the time that I normally slept, since my custodial engineering took place on second shift. Despite getting a perfect score on the civil service test, potential supervisors were turned off by my lack of clerical experience, my stated plans to use the tuition waiver to get my MLS and, therefore, a better job, or both, and even the people that I was using as references told me that I might have unrealistic expectations... but I stuck to my fucking guns. And eventually, by God and King Harry, got the job, and the degree.

So. YMMV, of course, but that's how it worked out for me. Gut it out and keep your eyes on the prize, is what I guess that I am trying to convey here.
posted by Halloween Jack at 2:08 PM on April 21, 2009 [1 favorite]


Do you have any money to spare for training for a new job? Do you like physical activity? I'm a certified spinning instructor, and I think I had to pay about $350 for the certification, but I only had to go to a day-long workshop to get qualified.

You could then approach gyms about teaching classes, or offer to sub.
posted by Evangeline at 2:15 PM on April 21, 2009


2nding Halloween Jack on library jobs. A friend has taken this route and put the tuition waiver to good use. (Mostly) clean, (mostly) quiet environment. Good pay. Free time to read or study. In many cases a decent baseline of respect from patrons and supervisors. Few verbal instruction (most clerk work is face to face interaction with patrons, sorting, computer work etc.) Nice work if you can get it.
posted by ladypants at 2:22 PM on April 21, 2009 [1 favorite]


I'm turned down constantly because of my lack of experience.

When I was going to community college for art and design, I volunteered at the school newspaper to get some experience. Yeah, it was working for free, but what the hell I was living at home and didn't have to worry about a real job and it gave me valuable experience and great fun with other students. When a graphic design position opened up at the school, everyone knew who I was and more or less pushed me into it, 'cause hey, everyone knew i was a solid, dependable worker, FREE OF DRAMA, seemed to know how to work those mysterious Macintoshes and was likable. I got that, a part-time gig and then when a friend of one my teachers had a a fulltime with benefits job open at his work, I was recommended.

Volunteer within your field. Work your ass off when you're volunteering. Get along with people. They'll notice and someone will recommend you for something. At worst, you'll gain lots of experience and many excellent recommendations.
posted by Brandon Blatcher at 2:32 PM on April 21, 2009


If you get an interview for a library job (there's a good chance you won't--we prefer to hire people with library experience, and, as you may have noticed, times are tough enough that a lot of degreed librarians can't find work), be sure to mention the clean, quiet environment and the large amount of free time for reading and studying.
posted by box at 2:34 PM on April 21, 2009 [6 favorites]


See if there are any test-grading companies in your area that grade standardized tests. You are qualfied if you went to grad school in some sort of reading/writing area. It's not a fun job, but it's an easy job and you can make a decent hourly wage.

Jobs that have a lot of down time/independence:
-Cashier at parking garage
-Office building security
-Late night/weekend answering service

Other suggestions:
-Nanny (you will probably have to have childcare experience of some sort), unless you work for parents who are really obsessive, which a lot of parents who can hire nannies are.
-Uh, I can't think of any more because you don't want to work in an office.

By ruling out office work, you are cutting out like 90% of the jobs you could possibly get hired into in this economy. Office jobs can be fun.

Also, if you are forgetful, there are these wonderful tools called pen and paper where you can write stuff down. Like food orders, for example.
posted by fructose at 3:12 PM on April 21, 2009 [1 favorite]


Similar to cranberrymonger and fructose's suggestions:

A sociology professor once told me that Erving Goffman encouraged his graduate students to work as hotel/motel night clerks. They had time to catch up on their reading and could learn a lot just watching the comings and goings of the night patrons.
posted by ladypants at 3:20 PM on April 21, 2009 [1 favorite]


[You know where metatalk is. If you want to post there, post there, but don't stand around here talking about it.]
posted by cortex at 3:42 PM on April 21, 2009


Are you good at making things clean? The best unskilled job I ever had was as a school cleaner. We did it in the late afternoon after the kids had gone home; I didn't have to deal with customer service and half the time not with co-workers either, and as long as I got the work done I was pretty much alone with my own thoughts. There was an element of grossness in some of the stuff that had to be cleaned, but it wasn't too bad. I worked my way through university as a cleaner. Cleaning offices would probably be even better.

The other great job I had was in a small nursery (the plant kind) where I worked on 'pricking out' seedlings and repotting plants. That was a small business and not too physically punishing.

If you're the kind of person who's overly analytical or has a lot to think about in your studies or personal life, physical jobs where you work with your hands are the best thing you can do as a secondary job. They're grounding. You can switch your brain off for a while and go all zen, or you can get into the rhythm and use the time to really think about something. You can see the results of what you're doing.

Apart from that, agreeing with what a lot of others have said about learning to work within the rules giving you the eventual freedom to work outside them after you've proved yourself. When you're young and have two degrees and no industry experience (I've been there) you are not attractive to employers because you're untried and unproven. If your degree is in school counselling, you could try and get some volunteer work in a related field while you do the shitty job to pull in some income.
posted by andraste at 4:20 PM on April 21, 2009


This is slightly off topic, but school counseling is a pretty verbal-comprehension-and-recall specific job. You might put some thought into what else you want to do in the future, since your skills in that area are not great.

That said, everyone from your kind of Master's program enters the job market with about the same experience. How have your friends gotten hired?
posted by OmieWise at 5:29 PM on April 21, 2009


In terms of pursuing your career, are there any independent or religious schools you could approach to offer counselling on a part time basis, say one or two days a week? I'm sure there must be many smaller schools without full time counselling staff, this is certainly the case where I live.
A suggestion for a good second job is to get a commercial driving license. Once you have the ticket, you will have a back-up job for the rest of your life. Note that it also opens doors beside delivery trucks - armoured cars, buses, even some emergency workers need higher grade licensing.
posted by bystander at 9:49 PM on April 21, 2009


Overnight shift at a convenience store - laid back (usually no boss there at all if even other employees), slow pace, interesting customers (to say the least), probably decent pay (maybe not $10 tho).

My first job out of college was overnights at a convenience store and it was kind of awesome.


Ditto this. Hung out with a friend who did this during high school. Eg, using the hose to wash off the area by the pumps. Restocking the cooler. Standing around reading or chatting the rest of the time.
posted by salvia at 11:19 PM on April 21, 2009


I'm not sure where the poor listening skills thing comes from, but from a counseling perspective, I think there is some validity about figuring out what you are interested in listening to. That is, there are some people who have a doozy of a time listening to people share information about things (the six of us want these eight different menu items these 3 different ways) but have no problem listening to people talk about themselves. There are others who can listen to impersonal data all day (here are 56 facts, sort them correctly), but would rather chew glass than listen to people talk about themselves, or help them solve any of their problems.

So counseling may be an option. The feel good of helping people sometimes makes up for all the bullshit that might exist.

On the other hand, I know someone who is a test driver for new Mercedes Benzes. If you love and know a lot about cars, and don't mind the isolation, its a pretty neat job.
posted by anitanita at 11:19 PM on April 21, 2009


Sixcolors, people give you a hard time on metafilter because you want to have your cake and eat it too. That is, you want to live at home with your parents but complain about how controlling your dad is, knowing that you could find a place on your own if you sucked it up and worked somewhere full time. This is the definition of entitlement.

I think you should work a horrible job for 6 months to a year. Then you will appreciate easy jobs, and then perhaps it will give you the motivation you need to use your college degrees for a future career (such as becoming a school counselor.) So work fast food for a year. Get over the way meat makes you feel and just concentrate on working 40 hours a week, being a dependable employee, and focus enough that you don't forget the correct amount of change to give people. If you're using drugs, you might want to stop them until you can manage to remember things and use at the same time.

This really isn't a short term answer to "what are some non-bullshit jobs". But it is a long-term answer. And if you actually follow the advice (which you won't, I'm sure) you will be happier in the long term.
posted by Happydaz at 7:09 PM on April 22, 2009 [3 favorites]


I just thought of another thing--substitute teaching. Most places just require you to have a bachelor's degree in something, so your master's in school counseling is more than enough. The scheduling is totally flexible--they call you, sometimes the morning of, and say "can you teach this class at this school for this number of days?" And you can say no, for whatever reason.

The main reason it seems like it might be a good fit for you is that, if you do want to use that counseling degree, you would have the opportunity to see many different schools in the area, maybe meet the principal, see the different student populations they serve, have lunch in the faculty lounge and find out what the teachers really think of the place, etc. It would also look better on your resume, I would think, to have stayed somewhat in the education field.
posted by hydropsyche at 7:02 AM on April 23, 2009


I totally agree with hydropsyche. In my area it's actually really difficult to break into substitute teaching in public schools because the jobs are in such high demand and are generally given to union teachers or retired teachers. But independent/private/religious schools are much easier to find gigs at. You might get a long term set up if someone is on a leave of absence. Otherwise, expect calls at 6am or so to see if you are available to fill in. It will look okay on a CV and you will almost certainly have stories to tell.
posted by ladypants at 10:30 AM on April 23, 2009


Haven't read the eleventy billion other comments, but is there anything you could do for your current employer to increase revenue enough to cover the cost of employing you full-time?
posted by Jacqueline at 2:01 AM on April 25, 2009


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