Skip

Paddling techniques to maximize pain and minimize injury
March 8, 2009 10:52 AM   Subscribe

So my submissive partner has recently discovered that she loves a good hard paddling. Problem is, in achieving the level of pain she wants, bruises are created. How can we avoid bruising while still maintaining a fairly severe pain scenario? Is it a function of the weight of the instrument? We're looking for that situation where the immediate effect is shocking, and it hurts for a day and a half afterward. Also, if you share our tastes, what's your favorite paddle?
posted by anonymous to Human Relations (14 answers total) 6 users marked this as a favorite
 
I know this isn't quite the advice you're looking for but - in case it helps - in my experience, arnica gel (available at any homeopathic shop) makes bruises disappear in half the time.
posted by pammeke at 11:00 AM on March 8, 2009


I know this isn't quite the advice you're looking for but - in case it helps - in my experience, arnica gel (available at any homeopathic shop) makes bruises disappear in half the time.

That's not what the scientific literature says:
The majority of randomized clinical trials suggest that homeopathic arnica is no better than placebo in treating bruising, swelling, and pain. Data from existing clinical and basic science research studies do not support a favorable risk:benefit ratio for arnica therapy and offer no advantages over the use of conventional treatments.
posted by grouse at 11:05 AM on March 8, 2009 [2 favorites]


OK. But I'm anemic, bruise easily, and often have bruises last for 10 days or more. I've seen deep bruises fade after 3 days using arnica gel. But I'm not a scientist. YM (or anyone else's) MV.
posted by pammeke at 11:14 AM on March 8, 2009


Not all arnica ointment is homeopathic.
posted by HFSH at 11:23 AM on March 8, 2009


From the alt.sex.spanking FAQ:

Toys that are heavy in relationship to their breadth bruise more. Those
that are lightweight sting more. Try paddles made of lightweight plastic or
wood to minimize bruising. Wooden spoons, ping-pong paddles, and spatulas
are also good to try. Just because an implement is lightweight doesn't mean
it can't really hurt! Speeding up the rate between swats greatly affects
the sensation. Varying the number of fast repetitions, rather than the
force, offers another degree of control for the spanker.

Also, if the concern is doctor related rather than aesthetic, there are many kink-friendly and kink aware medical professionals.
posted by Cat Pie Hurts at 11:31 AM on March 8, 2009


Not all arnica ointment is homeopathic.

The evidence base for non-homeopathic arnica is even thinner. I found a review article but it didn't list a single peer-reviewed study that investigated non-homeopathic arnica and bruising.
posted by grouse at 11:36 AM on March 8, 2009


She could try taking more Vitamin K and Vitamin C.
Those helped me; I used to bruise like a banana from grappling. It seems to me that after a while your body just gets used to it and toughens up; maybe this will happen with your partner too.
posted by bink at 1:29 PM on March 8, 2009


I would think that bruising might be a function of the surface area of the paddle. A smaller paddle concetrates all the force into a smaller area, a larger paddle spreads it out. So a larger paddle might cause less local trauma and less bruising. It might hurt less too and it might be hard to get a fast enough swing because of air resistance?

(the principle here is the same one behind why my wife could walk barefoot on my back, with no problems. But if she puts high heels on... (not that this is something we do, just sayin))

Good luck
posted by RustyBrooks at 1:38 PM on March 8, 2009


It might hurt less too and it might be hard to get a fast enough swing because of air resistance?

If the broad and thin paddle had holes in it, there'd be less air resistance and a much faster swing - basically, it seems like the anon wants a human fly swatter (except made of something sturdier than plastic).
posted by muddgirl at 2:27 PM on March 8, 2009


If the broad and thin paddle had holes in it, there'd be less air resistance and a much faster swing - basically, it seems like the anon wants a human fly swatter (except made of something sturdier than plastic).

Paddles like that do in fact exist: here's an example.

Because they're lighter and can be swung faster than solid paddles, they're less thuddy and more stingy. They may be less likely to leave bruises, but they're more likely to raise welts or even break skin if you're not careful — especially if the edges of the holes aren't rounded off. None of that's necessarily a bad thing, depending on what you're into, but it's something to look out for if you're worried about leaving marks.
posted by nebulawindphone at 2:48 PM on March 8, 2009


[derail] The evidence base for non-homeopathic arnica is even thinner. I found a review article but it didn't list a single peer-reviewed study that investigated non-homeopathic arnica and bruising.

Try this article about Sesquiterpene lactones: (from a peer reviewed publication)

In traditional medicine, alcoholic preparations from flowers of Arnica montana and Arnica chamissonis ssp. foliosa are applied externally to treat hematomas, contusions, sprains, rheumatic diseases, and superficial inflammations of the skin. The secondary metabolites that mediate the anti-inflammatory effects are sesquiterpene lactones of the 10alpha -methylpseudoguaianolide type like helenalin, 11alpha ,13-dihydrohelenalin, chamissonolid, and their ester derivatives (1-3). Several studies have investigated how these natural compounds exert their anti-inflammatory effect. Sesquiterpene lactones have been shown to modulate many processes that influence inflammatory reactions, for example, oxidative phosphorylation, platelet aggregation, histamine and serotonin release (3, 4).
posted by oneirodynia at 5:51 PM on March 8, 2009


Mentioning how something has been used in traditional medicine does not constitute an investigation of arnica and bruising.

And verifying that chemicals found in arnica have anti-inflammatory characteristics in vitro and in animal models is far, far away from a clinical trial verifying its supposed beneficial effects for bruising. For example, ibuprofen is a drug with known anti-inflammatory properties, but it's probably not a good idea to use it when you're bruised because it increases bleeding. And in fact, one of those references indicate that lactones from arnica do the same thing.

So if anything, those references indicate that one should not use arnica for bruising (which may be why the homeopathists say that you should do so, as part of their "opposite day" approach to medicine).
posted by grouse at 9:29 PM on March 8, 2009


hey, can we please get back to the sexy topic of this person and their submissive bruising asses and grinning about it? why are we talking about homeopathic medicine?!
posted by nadawi at 10:36 PM on March 8, 2009 [3 favorites]


[Enough with the arnica back-and-forth. Cases have been more than sufficiently stated in here for now.]
posted by cortex at 10:41 PM on March 8, 2009


« Older I want to find an image that w...   |  What is this antenna used for?... Newer »
This thread is closed to new comments.


Post