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Can you name this seven note tune?
November 6, 2008 9:35 PM   Subscribe

You've heard these famous seven notes (SLYT) countless times, can you identify where they originated or what they're called? Do they have a name?

It's the last seven notes of many, many musical arrangements, but I can only think of You Can't Do that on Television's theme song right now. Link goes to the last 5 seconds of the theme for easy listening.

Can anyone tell me what this little part of the tune is called AND/OR maybe do you know what these types of musical punctuation elements are called?

I have to find this short arrangement among thousands of songs in a royalty free music library and it will be nearly impossible to do without knowing more about this little ditty.
posted by plasticbugs to Media & Arts (8 answers total) 7 users marked this as a favorite
 
Benny Hill used that in the past, but I know it dates back at least as far as Vaudeville.

When everyone else on stage would beat up on the interlocutor (chief comedian or master of ceremonies), e.g. smashing a pie in his face, as he comically wiped away the pie that comedic button would be played.

As to what specifically that musical device is called, that's a good question! There has to be something more precise than comedic button.
posted by arnicae at 10:04 PM on November 6, 2008


It's probably a sting with its origins in vaudeville and burlesque [via]. See also: coda, outro, fade-out, fanfare, rimshot, etc.
posted by dhartung at 10:16 PM on November 6, 2008


I think the question is what that specific sequence of notes is called.

For example, there's a similar sequence of notes which is explicitly known as "Shave and a haircut". The OP is asking if there is an explicit name for this particular sequence of notes, not whether there's a generic name for these kinds of short sequence of notes taken as a collective.
posted by Class Goat at 10:22 PM on November 6, 2008


By the way, I'm sure it does go back to vaudeville, just as does "shave and a haircut".
posted by Class Goat at 10:23 PM on November 6, 2008


can you identify where they originated

Just trying to help with all of the aspects of the question as presented, Class Goat.
posted by arnicae at 11:23 PM on November 6, 2008


Actually, I'm looking for as much information about this musical "sting" as I can get - not just what this particular one is called - although that's the most important part of my multi-faceted question. Thanks for all the great answers so far. Please, keep them coming.
posted by plasticbugs at 12:23 AM on November 7, 2008


I don't have time to find it in my copy, but if this information is out there I'm betting it will be in The Book Of World Famous Music.
posted by rhizome at 8:02 AM on November 7, 2008


I have to find this short arrangement among thousands of songs in a royalty free music library and it will be nearly impossible to do without knowing more about this little ditty.

Here's one in a stock music library (it's the second & third "vaudeville flourishes" played). The exact same sample, in another library.

It kind of sounds similar to (but not exactly like) the last two lines of the intro (0:08-0:11, 0:12-0:14) of Scott Joplin's "Original Rags" (stock version here).
posted by neda at 1:19 PM on November 7, 2008


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